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There are plenty of subjects related to storing a guitar in various conditions, but most talk about exposure to direct sunlight or other notable sources of heat or are a bit vague.

My problem is that I live underneath the roof and during the summer heat waves it can get a little unbearable. I'm not 100% sure what the exact temperatures inside are (it can easily be over 30 degrees Celsius outside), but it's really uncomfortable.

Now, I don't plan to ever leave my electric guitar next to a heater (winter) or in direct sunlight. I am however worried about the effects of the general temperatures on my guitar if I just leave it in my room. There would be no sudden temperature changes (unless I actually decide to carry it downstairs - I can FEEL the temperature drop / rise going from floor to floor), it would just generally be warm during such days.

What are acceptable temperatures for an electric guitar? Should I be worried about mine? If these conditions aren't good is there anything I could do to make sure the guitar doesn't get damaged?

I could, of course, ask someone to store it for me during such days, but then I can't play. :(

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This question regarding leaving your guitar in the car has some useful info. From @Wheat's answer:

...changes in humidity that your physical body can't stand...this will severely fatigue the wood in your guitar

...will also weaken the glue holding the wooden plates and braces together, causing the guitar to slowly fall apart.

...the metal truss rod bows or warps positively or negatively every time it is exposed to a large swing in temperature.

Generally large changes in temperature or humidity are the problem. If your guitar is kept at a reasonably high temperature it will probably be fine (unless it gets hot enough that the glue melts!) - I wouldn't class 30 degrees as too high in this instance. The linked question discusses leaving a guitar in the car, which can get much hotter than that!

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Let me point out that it can be "over 30 degrees"... outside. I'm not entirely sure what temperatures are inside - it can definitely feel like a lot, because it's so stuffy. I also saw the question / answer you linked before posting - my particular problem is about lower temperatures (cars can really be terrible during the summer, no doubts there) - thus I asked. :) I was hoping there's a definite "above XYZ degrees it's getting dangerous" rule. I'm definitely not worried about changes in temperature... –  Shaamaan Jul 2 '13 at 8:37
    
At really high temperatures you start to worry about glue melting, or metal parts bending, but it will depend on the type of guitar. A solid electric guitar may not be very sensitive, but an acoustic guitar could suffer a large effect. –  Dr Mayhem Jul 2 '13 at 12:19
    
I'd really like to know what "high temperatures" means. >_< Is it 40 degrees? 50? 60? I do remember someone mentioned that if a human is comfortable in a given temperature, then a guitar is OK. By this logic, 40 degrees is already starting to sound bad... –  Shaamaan Jul 3 '13 at 8:22

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