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I'm going to give 2 examples so you understand the point

  • If you want to play She's Gone, how you do so? when he screams "Hey Lady...". I tried to play all the time on 8 - 9 holes doesn't sound right, 8' and 9' are worse. i played 4 - 8 and it sounds better, but It's not the real notes.

It's not just about that song, it's about all the songs that has electric guitar, I've never been able to match an electric guitar, especially those songs which has high tabs, the harp seems to make noise when you play long high tabs.

But if you play other songs on acoustic guitar or piano, like "When I was your man", even if you play high tabs for a long time, it doesn't sound that bad. Maybe because you can play lowest tabs?

Is it just about electrical guitar or not? How to play long high notes? they don't bend.

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2 Answers 2

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I'm not sure whether you're trying to play the vocal line from She's Gone on harmonica, or whether you're trying to play the lead guitar part on harmonica.

Either way, the principle is the same: different instruments have different capabilities. It sounds as if you're trying to play long sustained notes at the top end of your harmonica's range.

It's pretty common for the top end of a harmonica to sound "reedy" - a bit of a hiss alongside the tone. You may be able to improve this by looking around for a better harmonica, or by experimenting with breath control to find the perfect blow pressure for that note.

However, more generally, understand that while some people's voices, and many electric guitars are designed for that range, your harmonica probably isn't. You don't hear those notes sustained on many recordings, and there's a reason for that -- it doesn't sound very nice.

You would have the same problem, for example, adapting violin solos.

Copy actual harmonica parts, or when writing your own parts or adapting parts for other instruments, bring the arrangement into the natural range of the instrument. Perhaps you need to find a sneaky place to drop by an octave.

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Heres a good how to on playing singles notes http://www.harmonica.com/single-notes-harmonica-4947.html ...once I got that down, playing songs a lot easier, even 8 and 9.

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This answer would be more useful if it included some detail, even an excerpt of the site linked to , but a link only answer is not useful here. –  Dr Mayhem Sep 11 '13 at 23:28

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