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On occasion I've accidentally left a capo on (overnight). Does this decrease the life of the strings, staying in tune time, hurt the neck, or anything else that's bad?

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2 Answers 2

I would certainly not leave the capo on my fretboard when not in use. I cannot say it visibly hurts the neck for sure but it does wear out the strings. Here is a wonderful piece of advice from Lee Griffith in his article, A Capo is a Wonderful Thing:

One caution is important to mention. Do not leave the capo on the instrument when not playing it. The capo, when clamped on the neck, holds the strings down on the fretboard and creates extra tension on the neck and the top of the guitar. All acoustic guitars are destined, at some point in time, to have problems due to the tension of the strings. Why hasten the process by leaving a capo clamped on your guitar?

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I doubt the capo adds much tension to the strings. If this was really a problem then we'd be detuning our guitars every time we're done playing. –  Anonymous Jan 14 '11 at 6:46
    
@Brian Ortiz: Eh... I myself have left my capo on overnight on several occasions. But it's not about the tension to the strings but the extra stress on the neck due to the increased tension in the strings, which could be significant, depending on where the capo is placed. One certainly doesn't want to have the capo perpetually hugging the neck. –  Jimi Oke Jan 14 '11 at 7:15
    
@Brian: But, yes, it's not really about string life, here... –  Jimi Oke Jan 14 '11 at 7:16
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I know what you meant, I just think you're exaggerating the amount of tension added by the capo. –  Anonymous Jan 14 '11 at 7:33
    
@Brian: Oh, I see... but I merely posted up Griffith's. That wasn't really my opinion :) but just so my answer could have more weight. Anyway, I just don't leave the capo on unnecessarily too long, just as I don't keep my bass plugged in when I'm not playing! But really, if one leaves the capo on every night, if the strings have a phosphor coating, that will begin to crack right at that fret and strings may probably have to be changed faster. I never keep the capo on anyway, since I always clean my fretboard after each session... –  Jimi Oke Jan 14 '11 at 7:44

My question is, why do you want to leave the capo on the guitar all the time? To keep the guitar in a higher-than-normal pitch, or to lower the action?

A properly set-up guitar will have very low action without buzzing, equally as low as you'd get with a capo in place. It is also a lot more fun to play.

If you want higher than standard tuning, then take the guitar to your local guitar-repairshop and talk to the head tech. Tell him you want to keep your guitar in a higher tuning than normal but don't necessarily want to keep using a capo to achieve it. They can suggest lighter-guage string brands you can tune a bit higher, and then tweak the guitar so any increased string tension won't raise the action. The idea with the lighter gauge strings is to help reduce the tension at the higher pitch, but odds are good you'd have to have a minor tweak to keep the action feeling nice and comfortable.

The only times I'd use a capo is to get a particular sound, since stopping the strings at the 5th, 7th or 12th fret sounds very different than completely open strings. Or, because a particular song calls for it because that's how the original artist played it.

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People are lazy. You don't necessarily want to leave it on, but you do so nonetheless. I tend to leave the capo on if I use it just before I put away my guitar. –  Anonymous Jan 14 '11 at 11:12

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