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Whenever I sing I can notice my voice is overly showing nasality and I hate it.I tried to keep my tongue flat rather than bulging to touch the top surface of the mouth. But nothing works exactly as I thought. So, please help me. Is there a surgery to help me? And Can I consult a doctor for this? If so, what type of doctor should I want to consult?

Also, I am thinking of going for a vocal training. How many months would it take to learn all?

I am including my voice here:

http://vocaroo.com/i/s1OMk8S2QFjb

http://vocaroo.com/i/s0QpArKbE0Xj

Please examine and say. Although, I just sang unprofessionally.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, relax. At 14 you are much, much, much to young to be considering any type of surgery. Further, surgery for vocalists is pretty much contained to removing nodules that develop on the vocal chords from improper technique and abuse.

There are several reasons why you sound "nasily":

  • The music you listen to - your second sound clip featured you singing a Miley Cyrus song, and naturally, you imitate the people you listen to. Miley has fairly poor vocal technique and sings with a nasily, strident tone. If you want to make beautiful sounds you must listen to beautiful sounds.

  • You are young - at 14 your voice has just begun to develop out of adolescence and it is a process that will take many years before your voice is fully mature. That's just the way our bodies work. Your voice is very young and you should not push it into places it shouldn't go. If you sing and get tired, take a rest, don't force it.

    • Lack of training - lessons, knowledge, technique, and guidance from an experienced voice teacher (not a "vocal coach") will set you up for success and many years of beautiful singing.

    • Too tense / Need more air - tenseness causes restriction of airflow and vocal cord resonance. If your vocal cords can't resonate fully (with a good supply of air!) your tone will suffer.

Vocal training (taking lessons) is something that will be on-going and it will take years and years for your voice to develop. In an age where everyone expects everything to be immediate, if it's worth doing, isn't it worth taking the time to do it right?

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Thank you so much Your answer is very reasonable and it guided me. My voice sounds sometimes very poor. Sometimes, beautiful. Yes, I was really kinda tensed to analyse my voice and I got fear that whether my voice would be extremely nasal.I guess, I lack so much in air flow. Yes, I guess, I must listen to beautiful voiced people like taylor and selena. –  Kohila Dec 30 '13 at 8:45
2  
@Kohila - glad you found my answer helpful. With respect to "beautiful voiced people" I was referring more toward the likes of Jessye Norman... youtube.com/watch?v=jOIAi2XwuWo (For future reference, popular music is not a good model for learning vocal technique.) –  jjmusicnotes Dec 30 '13 at 14:12
    
I take issue with this. Beauty is subjective, and if you want a rock/pop voice, you should imitate rock/pop artists. Imitating Placido Domingo won't help you sound like Mick Jagger. Placido Domingo singing Gimme Shelter would sound ridiculous. Jessye Norman singing "I Will Always Love You" would sound ridiculous. If you want to sing female pop, listen to Miley Cyrus, Whitney Houston, Beyonce, and imitate away! –  slim Jan 2 at 10:38
    
@slim - I agree with you - even ugly things can be beautiful. Though they might be popular, they aren't singing with proper vocal production techniques, which is how I aimed my answer. I also wanted to provide more context for knowledge and experience - people shouldn't be thinking that the "pop" model is the only model or that it is even the standard. It is much like people who grow up only eating sweets and thinking it is real food. –  jjmusicnotes Jan 2 at 16:56

Vocal training will definitely help you. Asking about surgery at this stage is likely to be pointless - get your technique looked at first, then if the vocal coach thinks there is a problem and you need a doctor, follow their guidance.

As far as length of time - there is no answer to this: it is entirely down to the individual.

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Thank you so much. I am very grateful to your answer. –  Kohila Dec 29 '13 at 7:19

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