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I've seen a few of these questions asked, but it seems like most of the students to be where just starting out in music. They didn't have limber fingers, couldn't read notes. That's not a bad thing considering we've all had to start somewhere.


Question!

I'm wondering how long it would take an experienced musician going on 11 years of theory / guitar experience to make a half way decent player. Or if anyone else has been through a similar situation. Any information or tips to speed up the process would be appreciated.

I've been playing for a few weeks. I've already studied the instrument in depth, including its construction. I'm gaining proficiency in vibrato rather quickly, from what I understand, taking steps to avoid reinforce bad muscle memory whilst teaching myself. I used to teach guitar.

I'm capable of reading the Alto and Treble clefs (minus the more difficult task of pairing the notes with the fretboard. That's still a work in progress). I can make a clear sound and am starting work on pieces like Tchaikovsky's Possession (for vibrato practice) and Cello Suite No. 1 (for general practice).

I practice roughly 6+ hours per day. (Not continuous play, but rather attacking the instrument from every perceivable angle.)

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is a shortcut, yes. The secret is to practice smart.

I used to tell my students there is a difference between practicing and playing; between cleaning up all the difficulties and going into the small details, and playing just for fun or for others.

The more time you spend in cleaning grey zones, being careful with sound quality, with fast exercises (but only as fast as you can play without missing tones); the better.

When you clean a passage, scale, or arpeggio and play it many extra times, you are building a stronger platform for the rest of your playing.

I think about a pyramid: if you spend time building a large base, then you can go high; it's mathematics.

So, be tolerant and patient. If something sounds not good, spend an hour with it, then rest or play something else and return to the same point. Playing things in slow motion is both hard and extremely beneficial. Playing fast is also good, but not so fast that you lose control.

Exercise in a dark room--for hours. The lack of light will develop your ears and your muscle memory. It will make you play by ear. You will develop. If you play the same passage in a comfortable tempo (and not too long a passage, maybe like 4-10 bars) 10 times in a row, the human brain will find new details in it and you will develop, get an enhanced level of detail that will be there for the next passage, and everything will be faster afterwards as a result.

The answer to how many years is based on the individual, and also depends on the musical genre.

But start by being smart in the way you spend time with the instrument and record your self at least once every two weeks.

If you do this, you are on the right track.

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Practicing in the dark is a vary good idea, I could see how that would have beneficial applications. Thank you for your answer, I'll add that to my routine. –  Cynthium Roses Jan 20 at 22:12
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Helpful answer, but what does gender have to do with proficiency? –  Aryeh Jan 21 at 16:16
    
@Aryeh! thank you for pointing out! I meant musical genre(!) not male/female gendre... excuse my bad english :/ –  Sergio Jan 21 at 16:46
    
@Sergio -- I was going to proofread this answer for you after you clarified, so I'll do so now! –  NReilingh Jan 21 at 16:49
    
@NReilingh, i say "thank you" to that :) –  Sergio Jan 21 at 16:51
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If you've got 11 years of guitar and theory, with time and devotion you can most certainly become a proficient violinist.

I've got 6 years of music experience, and I picked up the cello a few months ago, and it's going well. The hardest thing about bowed string instruments is the bowing! If you buy your violin at a good respectable violin shop they will most likely be able to put learning tape on your instrument. Some people might look down on learning tape, but I feel that learning tape is very good for picking up bowed string instruments.

The tape serves a similar purpose to the frets on a guitar. Eventually you'll have to get rid of the tape, but for starting out, it'll be remarkly similar to playing guitar, except for the tuning which is the same as a mandolin for the violin. So if you've tinkered with a mandolin, you're off to an even better start.

Practice smart, practice for at least 30 minutes a day as often as possible, 4-5 times a week if you can. Also, focus on the bowing. The bowing is crucial. The fretting is different due to the lack of frets, but if you start with tape, you can side step that issue, but you need to bow correctly!

So go for it and have fun!

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Thank you, I did tape my own instrument when I first got it. It helped my initial blank stare at the neck. I'm removing the tape now that my fingers are becoming more accustom to the notes on the neck. –  Cynthium Roses Jan 21 at 18:27
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