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I recently bought an Alesis iO2 Express recording.. thingy. It came with Cubase 5. I downloaded and installed some amp simulators into the software. Currently I can only figure out how to apply the amp simulator to something that I have recorded.

How can I play through the amp without having to record something first? So, just jam through it at my computer.

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1 Answer 1

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  1. You need to have your audio interface as Cubase input device.

  2. Connect your guitar to an input in your audio interface (the recording thingy).

  3. In Cubase create an audio track, and as input source select the input of your audio interface where you connected your guitar. That interface has 2 different inputs, so you will need to select either input 1 or 2.

  4. To listen to the guitar through Cubase you need to enable either record or input in the track you just created. Those buttons are below the track name, together. It's a record icon, and a speaker icon.

  5. Add the plug-ins to the track.

You should be able to play through your amp simulators live now.

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thanks! I'm noticing a slight lag.. is that always going to be the case since it has to alter audio on the fly? –  Jake Zeitz Jan 27 at 5:19
1  
@JakeZeitz Lower the buffer size. Lower buffer size = less latency, but more processing power is used. Higher buffer size = more latency but less processing power is used. In general, you want low buffer sizes for recording and/or playing live, and you want high buffer sizes for post production (mixing, mastering, etc). I believe in Cubase you will find it in the Audio Options -> General tab –  JCPedroza Jan 27 at 5:24
    
Depending on the protocols/interfaces used, latency has some lower limits. Each serial encoding from A to D introduces more of it, id'd suggest having a clean bypass going straight into the amplifier that you mix with the processed signal. Aply some highcut and lowcut analogue filter on it, to filter out phasing effects. That way, you'll still hear the sound but have also the correct timing without latency. –  rhavin Jan 27 at 13:25
    
I set the buffer to 512, it won't go lower than that. There is still a tiny bit latency though. @rhavin I didn't hardly understand a word of that haha. –  Jake Zeitz Jan 28 at 16:22

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