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What should I do with vocal sample and what kind of instrument should I use to play and pitch sound like this? Below some examples with this kind of 'legato' vocal effect:

0:58 sec https://soundcloud.com/cashmerecat/withme

0:31 sec https://soundcloud.com/cashmerecat/wedding_bells

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The second onw sounds like a regular pitch-bend to me. The first one - I don't know. For a pitch-bend it is a bit "too good".

Some instruments have a thing called "fingered portamento". When you press a secod key without releasing the first, the sound slides up to the second key without going through its attack phase. Old Yamaha synths had this and it sounded great on an acoustic bass. But I don't know if its still around.

Another option is to use a sequencer and type in the pitch-bend numerically. That however is a bit tedious and you need to do some calculations (at least once) to convert semitones into pitch-bend controller-values.

I tried to solve a similar probme (bent notes on a guitar) and finally ended up using supercollider. With that thing you can use a midi-keyboard to control just about anything. But it requires programming.

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Is pitch-bend works differently in various instruments? I am asking because using typical pitch-bend in Ableton I am not able to achieve such effects. –  Fenix Apr 13 at 21:47
    
The default pitch-bend range may be different, but it can be set through a controller event or via configuration. What do you get from the Ableton and why is it not the desired effect? –  Martin Drautzburg Apr 13 at 21:57
    
Please check out one more time these vocals at 0.27 on Wedding Bells track. As u can see it's very smooth. It has some kind of a gliss. I can't obtain such sound. Maybe it is a matter of the arrangement of samples... –  Fenix Apr 13 at 22:18
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This could also be an "autotune" effect. The first may be actually sung this way (i.e. no pitch effect at all or just mild pitch correction). In the high-pitch part the formants go up as well (Mickey Mouse effect) which led me to believe that this is just pitch-bend. Autotune-like effects usally try to avoid this, but I don't know what it sounds like when you shift the pitch by one octave. You may want to google for "vocal pitch correction". –  Martin Drautzburg Apr 14 at 6:28

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