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Alright people, I have successfully tamed the beasts calling themselves my "parents". Now I am a free mind with money of his own to play music again.

I have a CTK-451 which basically is a 61 keyboard with unweighted and insensitive keys left from my childhood. Ha!

Jazz is what moves my spirit and so I want to get into music by what i like. Classical is very enjoyable also but Jazz is more "rock" and "let's move", which is what drives me to it every time.

When shown notes and I can tell you which is which and play it... slowly ... out of rhythm. Practice Practice Practice. I am aware of some basics of the circle of fifths but I am no prodigy.

Would you recommend me to take basic piano lessons first anyways(based on classical). If yes, I would "train" for the lessons on classical and study/play jazz in the rest of the free time.

What else could I practice?

For the keyboard I will get a full key, weighted(+sensitive) with midi or usb, piano.

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+1 from me because I'm interested in this too but would also like to see whether people recommend learning to read music of learning/ playing 'by ear' –  user2808054 Apr 14 at 11:45
    
This question (and answers) might help you: music.stackexchange.com/q/410/9198 –  Bob Broadley Apr 14 at 12:07
    
Aren’t there jazz piano lessons anywhere nearby you? I’d be guessing most of the basics (getting your posture right, learning the keyboard) would be the same at first, but could diverge quite quickly. –  Édouard Apr 14 at 13:19

2 Answers 2

As a classically-trained pianist who is now beginning to learn jazz piano, I would recommend taking classical piano lessons because with that comes classical music theory which is an important thing to understand, regardless of your chosen style.

Once you are suitably adept with classical piano, you could then begin to learn the features and practices of the jazz genre, as I am. However, since you are only beginning to learn the piano then you are probably in a good position to try to learn about classical music and jazz at the same time. You could take lessons with a classical trainer, and then study jazz alongside it.

Regardless of how you structure your learning, I would advise learning classical piano, because it is a good place to start and you can then branch out into many different styles, using your knowledge of basic western notation. The fundamentals remain the same - time signatures, key signatures, the twelve-semitones octave etc.

Basically: take classical lessons, buy jazz books, study classical and jazz theory.

Hope this helps.

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I get that is your experience, but does it mean it’s necessarily the right way? Especially if OP has no interest in playing classical music — this could very well be discouraging –  Édouard Apr 14 at 13:16
    
OP describes classical as 'very enjoyable', and I was careful not to say that it is the right way. My answer says: I would advise.... I wasn't trying to say that the way I learnt is the best way, by any means. I was trying to recommend it though, and I think my answer balances the two. –  Poben Apr 14 at 16:07
    
Yeah i have thought about pretty much the same but was not sure if this wouldn't be "too much". I'll try it this way. I bought a book from Frank Sikora(its on german; dunno if its available in english) which was advoctaed as one of the best on jazz improvisation/theory and as a pretty straightforward book. The thing about the tutor is the monthly pay 65-85€/month and especially the driving time i could practice. I prefere autodidactic measures most of the time anyways but i would need quality resources nontheless. "Pebber Brown" on YT has straightforward videos about music theory. Any other? –  user10099 Apr 14 at 16:39
    
In the UK, ABRSM are some of the best providers of theory books, and they also run exams. With practical, I don't really know - I have always relied on a teacher. A search of Amazon would probably give you some good results. –  Poben Apr 14 at 17:06

don't take classical lessons. It doesn't prepare you adequately for jazz. The problem is that classical teachers don't teach you about chords (harmony) and they don't encourage you to play by ear or to improvise - all of which are fundamental to jazz. So, my recommendation is to find a jazz pianist in your city, someone who plays in a way that you like, and ask them for weekly lessons. They can take you from the roots in blues, ragtime, that sort of thing, show you how to voice chords, how to play bass lines, and build your musical vocabularly on the road towards jazz.

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I would like to read some more opinions on his suggestion. –  user10099 Apr 19 at 17:49

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