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I have no idea why I am like the only one having such problems. My fingers always unwantedly muted the adjacent string to the strings I was playing. Even if it wasn't completely muted, the sound it produces decreases in clarity. I really want to know the tricks to avoiding muting string, if there are any.

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There are several things you might be doing to accidentally touch nearby strings. Can you describe it in more detail? Many questions like these include helpful pictures; do you have somebody who could take pictures of your fretting hand while you play? –  Bradd Szonye May 24 at 2:47
    
Are we to assume that you are referring to playing the guitar? You did not say what instrument you play. –  Wheat Williams May 24 at 6:57
    
It could also be ukulele, based on the user's previous questions. –  Bradd Szonye May 24 at 7:13
    
@user139024 please specify what instrument you are talking about! –  Shevliaskovic May 24 at 8:03
    
Guitar, not ukulele, acoustic, 12 fret –  user139024 May 24 at 12:41

1 Answer 1

I'm guessing the instrument is a guitar, but there are few clues. If you are muting the strings adjacent to the ones you are playing it should not be a problem.It's only when you mute the actual one you play that there may be a problem.In fact, on more advanced chords (I'm guessing again !), this is exactly what has to happen.

However, the solution may be that you're using the pad of your finger to press on the fret (the place with a fingerprint). Use the tip of a finger, and it does two things - it's a smaller area, and it doesn't 'bleed' over onto adjacent strings.

Another is that your fingers are large, and they don't happily fit the neck of your guitar. Some necks are thinner from top E to bottom E than others, to accommodate differing hand sizes.You'll also find that , particularly if you hold the guitar low, your whole hand is making your fingers go too flat on the fingerboard. Push it forwards, so the knuckles rise. This puts the tips rather than the pads on the board.

If this answer does not help, it may be because I'm barking up the wrong tree, in which case, I need more info !!

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Curling the fingers more can help to get fingertips on the string and improve overall agility. (The drawback is that it reduces reach.) –  Bradd Szonye May 24 at 7:15
    
Here is the problem, when I tried to reach the very top fret with my fingers, they go flat and so The pads are top the string. Another one is that, you know my left hand is kinda supporting the neck while my right hand strums, I found it hard to reach the bottom string. Every time I tried, my finger nails went into my way. –  user139024 May 24 at 13:00
    
If your left hand nails are longer than 3mm you'll have to cut them.Put a strap on the guitar, or change the way you sit - it will rest happily on either leg, but ideally needs to sit between them. Don't use the fretting arm to support the guitar. If your guitar body is level with the 12th fret, you will not find it too easy to fret up there with your middle or index finger. Use ring or pinky. –  Tim May 24 at 13:09

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