Take the 2-minute tour ×
Musical Practice & Performance Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for musicians, students, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't know if this is the right place to ask this kind of questions, sorry if it isn't.

Anyway, I'm trying to learn to play "What kind of woman is this" by Buddy Guy, but I can't find good tabs for this song on the Internet. I don't mean the solos or anything, just that funky main riff. I think it goes something like this:

    e|------------------------------------------|
    B|------------------------------------------|
    G|-----5------------------5-----------------|
    D|-----5------------------5----5-7-8-7-5----|
    A|----------5-7-8-7-5--0-----0--------------|
    E|--3-----3------------------------------3--|

Pastebin version

But I don't think it sounds just right yet, especially that power chord. Could someone point me in the right direction? I'm a noob and my hearing is no good.

I've also found live performance of this song here and I'm pretty sure they keep doing something around the fifth fret.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Can't see the tab in the blue box. It appears for a nanosecond and it's gone.This is just a 12 bar blues in E, very standard format, and the riff is using the blues notes. –  Tim Jun 21 at 17:17
    
@Tim strange, I have the same thing. Maybe someone who's better at formatting will edit this, in the meantime I posted a link to pastebin version. –  Dunno Jun 21 at 17:23
    
When this happens, you can use <pre> blah blah </pre> –  Shevliaskovic Jun 21 at 17:43

3 Answers 3

Can't be absolutely sure, but this should work:

enter image description here

Just a "heads-up", you might get this closed because it's about a specific song, rather than the process of transcription…

BTW, I didn't look at the live video, so wasn't looking at anybody's fingers! But, it seems like the chords probably work like this, so that you can keep that note ringing on between bar 2 and 3 (and so on…)

Finally, the last chord of the intro might have some more notes in it (it might be a C7 "shape" E7 chord), but I couldn't quite hear any. If you want to play it with a pick rather than fingers, this would be an easier way to play this last chord, so that you don't have damp so much…

This gives you a TAB for the intro. If instead you were asking how to work this out, here's a few bits of advice, from how I worked it out:

  • I tried playing along with the track (although I also listened to it without my guitar a couple of times, to see if I could work out most of it - obviously if you're a beginner, this is harder to do…)
  • the single notes were quite easy to work out; for the chords, I tried out a number of chord voicings that seemed sensible (essentially I first heard that it moves from E7 to A, then I had to work out the actual voicings of these chords). In the end, I could definitely hear the E and D in the first chord and all three notes in the second, I tried it with more notes in each chord (for instance a B in the first chord), but as I wasn't sure that they're there, I left them out… (In the end, it's best to put in what you're certain is there…)
  • Initially I went for the easiest fingering for the first chord, of just open E and fret 3 D, but two things made me pretty certain this isn't right: the thick tone doesn't sound like it has an open string in it; the E (fret 7, string 5) that rings between bars 2 and 3 suggest that the chord with E and D together must be higher up the neck (otherwise it's really hard to play them together!)
  • Never be satisfied with just getting the basic notes with a transcription; for me, the little grace note slides are just as important as other bits of the riff here. Sure, anybody who has heard this riff would be able to work out that they are there, but it is great to write something down accurately enough that a good player can read it and get it right first time, especially if you start writing TABs (or more likely music without TABs) for other guitarists (eg. players in function bands etc.) With the grace note slides, staccato marks and accents, a good reader will play this so it sounds pretty close to the original, even if they have never heard the song.

EDIT: I've put a bigger TAB in; hopefully it's easier to read...

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer, Bob. Don't care if this sort of comment is not allowed. Well done! –  Tim Jun 21 at 20:36
    
Cheers, buddy! (Pun totally intended…) –  Bob Broadley Jun 21 at 20:40

In E, it's 6-open, 5-2fret, 4-0,1,2,0, 5-2fret. Then on A the same, but from the A string.The B part, towards the end of the sequence, is the same riff, but starting on B.Sorry, don't write tab, but you don't get the rhythmic clues with it anyway.

share|improve this answer

The song is in E, why are you in G?

I cant get the preformat to work but it is E7 then 7th fret low E string to 5-6-7-5 on 5th string to 7 - 5 on low e to an A chord then 7 low e to 5-6-7-5 4th string to 7-7 on 5th string


    e|------------------------5------------------|
    B|------------------------5------------------|
    G|-----7------------------6------------------|
    D|-----6------------------7----5-6-7-5-------|
    A|-----7----5-6-7-5-------7--7---------7-7---|
    E|--0----7----------7--5---------------------|

share|improve this answer
1  
Use the <pre> tags to implement preformat. –  JCPedroza Jun 21 at 21:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.