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I am beginning to learn how to play the piano. The book I am using is called "Teach Yourself To Play Piano: A Quick and Easy Introduction for Beginners". One of the lessons in the book is a blank staff with the notes in letter format below the staff. You will then have to draw where the note is supposed to be. The answers are provided later in the book. The question I have is how do I know which E and which C it is asking for? For example it called for me to draw a C note and an E note. I don't know whether it is the C that is below the staff, or the C that is in "FACE". Same with E. I don't know whether it is the E in "EGBDF" or the E in "FACE". It is a standard just beginning staff, but I am not sure how to figure out which one I am to draw.

Thank you for any help anyone might be able to provide. If anyone has the book or access to the book, the pages are 10 and 14.

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2 Answers 2

As long as the question just says "C", then, in the treble clef, one ledger line below the staff, the third space in the staff and two ledger lines above the staff are all correct answers. There are ways to specify which one you want, for example a lot of people call middle C (one ledger line below the treble clef) C4, the third space in the staff C5 and two ledger lines above the staff C6—but the fact remains that they are all "C".

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From the sound of it, it doesn't matter: if you can write both of them, then you already know what the exercise is testing.

If only one is intended, my guess would be middle C (the one below the staff, in treble clef) and the octave going up from there, simply because that's generally what's taught first in piano.

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