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I have a Strat knock-off with a hard-tail offset-saddle bridge. I occasionally hear a"clinking" noise...just one, mostly on the unwound 1st 2nd and 3rd, when increasing pitch. I use Peterson clip-on strobe to get it just right. When the "clink" is heard, the pitch increases the pitch just a tad too much so the string over-shoots the desired mark.

I've replaced the standard saddles with Graph-tech originals, but I still heard the clink and have the tuning problems. Next, I re-strung the guitar with Fender bullets, in case the ball-ends were the problems. Still, the noise. Being offset, the strings pull the saddles side-ways a little, finding their resting spots. The strings then all touch the side of their saddles and there's always the possibility that the machine screws or their ball-point pen type springs are making the noise.

Would you suggest I switch to center-designed saddles set so the offsets are eliminated or buy a new bridge without the offset, or a third option? This is starting to drive me nuts!

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Have you tried graphite in the nut to prevent the strings from catching? Are the grooves in the nut the right size for the strings you're using? –  snailplane Jul 27 at 3:44

1 Answer 1

That sort of pinging noise usually happens because strings are getting caught on the nut, so the first thing I’d try is lubricating the nut with graphite like you’ve already done for the bridge.

If that doesn’t help, there’s another popular trick to keep your strings smooth at the bridge, which can also keep strings from breaking prematurely. Find some insulated wire about the same gauge as your guitar strings and strip off some insulation, about half an inch per guitar string. Re-string your guitar, threading the strings through the insulation such that it lays across the point where the strings cross the bridge saddle. This will protect the strings from the saddle edge and keep it from developing sharp edges or other defects.

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