Take the 2-minute tour ×
Musical Practice & Performance Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for musicians, students, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've had my share of booking in the states, but would like to know what differs abroad. I'm looking to take my solo project on an international tour... (My genre is dark piano rock/electronica.) Any experience or suggestions on where to begin?

Specifically:

  • Countries most accepting of alternative rock and/or American culture in general (Japan, Australia, others?)
  • International booking concerns
  • Approaching foreign venues (verifying credibility of both parties, compensation, etc.)
  • Merch concerns
  • General advice
  • Language barrier and how it plays into crowd interaction

Many thanks, SE-ers

share|improve this question
    
Downvoters: Please justify your vote with constructive criticism to help the OP (me) and the SE community. Thanks. –  Old McStopher Jul 24 '12 at 4:21
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Getting a promoter for each country should help you a lot - they know the right venues, the contacts etc. - but it is not necessary. I have known people who just went on the road and took what they could find, but you are rarely likely to find the most suitable gigs at that sort of short notice.

If you have your music on iTunes, Amazon or other global sites, you should be able to track where it is most popular - this could help you decide where to tour.

To help venues/promoters verify you, have a range of live footage on YouTube so they can see what you look like, and carry lots of demo CDs to give out.

I don't think there should be much concern about merch (other than making sure it doesn't get stolen) but research what might sell best in a particular region (eg for us, stickers and badges of our cartoon icons would be first on our merch list for Japan)

Language barrier can be a problem, but being able to greet the crowd in their own language will get you off to a good start. In saying that, English is pretty much ubiquitous so should work, at least partially, in most countries. Alternatively, you can deliberately misuse the language (see the first video link in my profile to see what I mean)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.