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Analogue VCOs in synthesisers are notorious for drifting with temperature. How can I make an analogue oscillator which will stay in the pitch it's meant to stay tuned to?

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Welcome to Music.SE! Please be sure to take a look at the FAQ before posting. "Audio production techniques and equipment" questions are off-topic here per the FAQ. Try asking this question on the Audio-Video Production SE instead. –  American Luke Jul 2 '12 at 13:37
    
As far as I can tell, this is about construction of electronic musical instruments. I don't see a reason to close; further discussion on meta. –  NReilingh Jul 2 '12 at 15:20
    
I do think this would be better on electronics SE, as the creation of frequency locked oscillators is an electronics issue, not a musical one. –  Dr Mayhem Jul 2 '12 at 20:55
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@DrMayhem Lubricating metals is a mechanical engineering question, but we brass players still need to know how to oil our valves. The nature of instrument construction and maintenance does go outside the scope of music, so my point is just that this is technically on-topic in light of that. You're certainly right that more of the relevant expertise is located at Electronics.SE. –  NReilingh Jul 3 '12 at 3:11
    
Here is the post on Electronics.SE: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/34970/… –  mjcopple Aug 20 '12 at 21:51
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closed as off topic by Wheat Williams, American Luke, Dr Mayhem, awe, NReilingh Aug 28 '12 at 15:04

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