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I was listening to the group Terravita's song and heard a awesome sounding synthesizer with what sounds like it has heavy effects. It sort of sounds like a flanger, but with an almost wetness or moist sound. Maybe used some type of formant oscillator for the basis of the sound. At least that's what it sounds like. When I attempted adding a flanger to synthesizer I like, it didn't sound like this even when automated via an envelope on the effect or done manually. Didn't have that moist feeling.

I don't need to be explained how to create the wobble or basics unless you think they did something out the ordinary to create this sound.

Here is the song with the first instance of the sound:

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Welcome to Musical Practice and Performance, Travis Dtfsu Crum. We are certainly not going to give you any grief about dubstep. –  Wheat Williams Sep 29 '12 at 2:26

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I am focusing on the part you are referring to, this sounds a lot like a "talk box" (along with some distortion and perhaps an additional flange.

A quick search brings up the term "Formant Filter" and also a video for a random product which shows the use of a formant filter as driven by a guitar: (

).

As far as I know, formant filters can take an audio sample (?) and use the waveform as a sort of control surface. In your example, it sounds like a voice sample was used.

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will tryout something like this. I have SugarBytes WOW which has a vowel mode. I bet it will sound similar. I use Ableton mostly but I have Reason and will try out what that video is saying to do with Thor and the formant filter, and will look into some 3rd part VST or AU formant filters as well –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 27 '12 at 17:16
    
I have a guitar amp simulator which has a module which allows you to assign the guitar input to ANY (and multiple) effects parameter: on/off, pedal, volume, gain etc. It is called an envelope follower. The Thor unit appears to allow multiple inputs as well as targets. –  horatio Sep 27 '12 at 17:28
    
like a vst? whats it called. does it have some sort of vocal effect like this? –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 27 '12 at 17:30
    
envelope follower the louder the sound, the more of a response you get. It does not typically produce sound on it's own, it is assigned to a parameter. In the video I linked, the part where the individual links the LFO to the y-axis of Formant filter is basically assigning an envelope follower to a specific parameter. (see for instance: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Envelope_detector ). The idea here is "how can I make the amplitude of a signal change another effect?" One could adjust "stereo width" based upon volume, crank the reverb as the inverse of the volume etc. –  horatio Sep 27 '12 at 19:20
    
oh shoot sorry, didn't even see you say it later in the comment. will try this tonight after work –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 27 '12 at 19:34

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