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I am having real trouble working out the optimal fingering for an arpeggio in this piano piece:

Arpeggio

(Note that lower G should be on the right hand stave. The piece is 104 bpm)

I have tried a few fingering combinations:

  • 5 4 3 2 1 123 - I struggle with this due to the span of my hand
  • 4 3 2 1 2 123 - Possibly the best I've come up with so far but it's hard to reach 2 over 1
  • 3 2 3 2 1 123 - Sounds too staccato

Does anyone have any recommendations for better fingering choice? If I can nail this I've pretty much got the piece in the bag!

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If I had to, I would play it that way: dl.dropbox.com/u/45770099/Finger.png –  Jack L. Dec 28 '12 at 13:58
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@JackL. the question is about piano fingering, not guitar. –  slim Dec 28 '12 at 14:05
    
But it did give me the idea for 4 1 3 2 1, that seems to work quite fluidly. –  deed02392 Dec 28 '12 at 14:07
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3 Answers

I think I would play 5 4 2 1 5 124.
There will be a quick arm move, or jump, over the thumb (1), from the first four notes to hitting G with 5. You only need to internalize this arm move and practice hitting the G with 5. The rest is right at your fingers (with a slight twist of the wrist to hit the 124 chord, but there should be time for that).

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For my hand the fingering 5 4 2 1 2 feels most comfortable. For me it's better than 4 3 2 1 2 because it requires less stretching and I can keep the hand a bit more rotated to the left which makes the 2 1 not so bad. If the 5 4 is difficult, 4 1 3 2 1 may be a better option.

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The problem with 5 4 2 1 2 is you can't then legato to the triad - you have to take your finger off to move your hand whereas on 5 4 2 1 4 you can at least pivot around to get the triad straight after letting off G... –  deed02392 Dec 28 '12 at 14:22
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If you need legato there, my first suggestion is to use the pedal, either for the whole arpeggio (changing when you hit the chord) or just for the 1/8th note. You can also do a quick finger change on the 1/8th note: press the key with 2, then with both 2 and 4, and finally only 4, then play the chord. The finger change is actually easier with 4 1 3 2 1, because the thumb lies comfortably on the same key with any other finger. –  nonpop Dec 28 '12 at 14:29
    
Note that this phrase is not marked legato in the music. I like this fingering the best too, having tried them out. –  Owen S. Jan 12 '13 at 17:12
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I can't play it fluently myself, but I think with practice I could get 5 4 2 1 4 123 to work.

Practice making the 5 4 2 1 4 run sound fluid, with the 4 coming over the 1, then the triad at the end should be quite easy.

(I've assumed the piece is in C major)

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The piece is C minor, not sure how that affects things. I have just come up with 4 1 3 2 1 after what JackL suggested. I'm really struggling to get 4 over 1 but it does seem that is better for getting the triad. –  deed02392 Dec 28 '12 at 14:09
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Well, the difference is the position of the hand. Actually being in Cm helps here because playing the Eb with your second finger leaves your hand slightly more tilted towards bringing the fourth over, than it would have if it were a E natural. –  slim Dec 28 '12 at 14:55
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