Take the 2-minute tour ×
Musical Practice & Performance Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for musicians, students, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can you predict whether an electroacoustic nylon guitar is going to have a rich/deep sound by looking at its technical specifications?

share|improve this question
    
You, well, just can't really - it's one of the reasons I'd always trying out instruments before buying them. –  berry120 Feb 2 '13 at 8:57
    
@berry120 For the electric part, that's quite true. But for the acoustic part, there are indicators to look for. Solid top is better than laminate. A full-size body is better than a "slim" one. –  luser droog Feb 2 '13 at 9:34
    
@luserdroog Sure, there's quality indicators to look for, but I've been surprised at how bad some expensive, technically "good" instruments have sounded to my ears and vice versa - so these days I generally (deliberately) put all preconceptions aside and just go and try the thing out. –  berry120 Feb 2 '13 at 10:22
2  
@berry120 Agreed. I was tempted once by the Charvel AE that claims everywhere to have 25 frets at the top. Even though I could see in the picture that there are only 24, I went ahead and ordered it. 24. And then the electrics shorted out. Ended up just giving it away because I couldn't stand to look at the thing anymore. Definitely try before you buy. At the same time, it's good to have some background information before walking into the shop, so as not to waste time on some that could've been predicted to be inferior. –  luser droog Feb 2 '13 at 10:35
add comment

1 Answer 1

Generally, no.

While you can look out for things like size (full size is better than a small one) and construction as @luserdroog says, there are so many variables that you need to play an instrument to see how it works for you.

Your playing style may mean a particular type of instrument works for you while it might not for me (for example if you use a heavy pick hand and I play flamenco style)

The circuitry could also be very variable, and even the pickups can change the sound, sustain, tone etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.