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These are progression from a song that I was playing with a friend but we don't understand it at all. Can somebody please explain conceptually why they sound good when played together i.e first person playing progression1 and second on progression 2 at same time.

Tuning - half step down 

Guitar 1

Guitar 1

Guitar 2

Guitar 2

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I believe this was closed because of the subjective nature of the question -- it might sound good to you but not others. It's also very localized because others are unlikely to have this question about the same progression, or to be able to find this question if they do (no identifying information). –  Matthew Read Mar 14 '13 at 17:36
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closed as not a real question by Andrew, Wheat Williams, American Luke, luser droog, vjones Mar 14 '13 at 15:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The intervals created are a major 3rd, minor 3rd, again major 3rd, perfect 4th, major 3rd, minor 3rd, major 3rd and finally a perfect 5th. If we interpret these as chords it could be A, G#m, F#m but for the F#m you're only playing the 5th, first inverted (below the root) then above the root (first F# is when you both play fret 11, second one is the last note; guitar 1 is playing C# one octave above from the first time it played that same note).

So... you start with the 1st degree of your key, then you play the 7th degree which is one of the dominant degrees, it "wants" to become the root, so it creates tension. You go back to the root, resolving the tension, and then you move to the 6th degree which is a direct substitution, it's stable, so no tension there. Back to the root, and then you create tension again with the 7th degree, then back to the root and 6th degree to resolve that tension.

If you only play one of those parts by itself, the hint about the scale on which it is goes away, and with it the tension and its resolution. So I guess that's why you feel it sounds nicer when played together.

You could play this with just one guitar, BTW; just play the second part on the first and second strings and you'll get the same effect.

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