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I'm now studying harmony and since my instrument is not keyboard, I don't know how to execute complex chords such as 13 or other chords that involve more than 5 notes.

Do you play them with just one hand while playing the melody?

I think I'm looking for a basic fingering bible of all chords (left-hand), scales (R & L), and arpeggios, preferably free (PDF etc.) of course.

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2 Answers 2

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AT most in the left hand, you'll play four tones simultaneously, but more often you're playing just two or three.

Generally when you are harmonizing the melody, you will voice chords in both hands with the melody note on top. A standard way to do this in jazz is put the root and third or root and 7th in the left hand, and fill out two more of the chord tones in the right plus melody note. This gives five tones across both hands, it's grounded because you're including the bass note on the bottom.

When you voice chords, important tones are root, 3rd, 7th, 9th and any altered tones. The fifth is not so important because it doesn't add to the harmony so it's sometimes excluded. So if you pick and choose the important ones to include. You can't include them all. So you have to leave out some.

There is no fingering bible of chords because different styles of music do different things. Gospel players use different chord voicing than pop players, which is different than etc. So it depends on what style of music you're doing.

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Great helpful answer. As I learn in a self-paced manner, and never really went to a piano or keyboard teacher, this post was really helpful. Any further info or redirection to articles or other resources on the subject will be much appreciated! –  Shimmy Mar 12 '13 at 20:42
    
You're welcome, Shimmy. Glad I could help. –  Michael Martinez Aug 9 '13 at 22:20

For scales and finger exercises, the Hanon studies are good. You can find them here. Part II has all the scales and arpeggios.

I wouldn't read the introduction and try to do as recommended (go through all the exercises from end to end over the course of a couple of years). Those Victorians were gluttons for punishment, after all. Pick and choose. That said, scales and arpeggios are important and it's a good idea to learn all of them.

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