1
vote
3answers
207 views

Why isn't this a c flat?

I am always wondering why the second c isn't flat? There is no signs before it? I know it is supposed to be played as natural, without natural signature? This question was roughly answered by my ...
12
votes
6answers
742 views

Do accidentals override key signature?

I am wondering how the accidental in the first chord (see what is circled) is played? Does any accidental simply move the note up or down a half-step from what the note is supposed to be based on the ...
10
votes
4answers
438 views

Do I write # or b?

I always had this doubt: in the staff do I write enharmonic notes with # or b? Does it matter which one I choose and why? For example: In the key of C Major, would I write this passage with an A# as ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the difference between sharp note & flat note?

In guitar or generally in any musical instruments, what is the difference between sharp notes & flat notes? For example : Are A♯ & B♭ the same? And are C♯ & D♭ the same? Does that make ...
4
votes
3answers
277 views

Temporarily Changing Keys - Which accidentals to use?

I've was taught that whenever you write a run of notes going up, you should use sharps instead of flats; And whenever you go downwards, you should generally write flats instead of sharps. My question ...
11
votes
2answers
219 views

Small natural above C in G Major

Here is a picture of the sheet music (Eine Klein Nachtmusik, movement 1). The odd accidental has a red freehand circle around it. What does this natural sign mean? As you can see, the key is G ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Accidental in Chopin Opus. 69 No. 2

This is an excerpt from Opus. 69 No. 2 by Chopin from the Henle Urtext: In the last bar seen in the excerpt, there is a sharp on the A in bass line. Since A is already "sharped" in the key ...
9
votes
1answer
275 views

Do accidentals on ornaments carry over to the other notes in the measure?

In the first measure from this section of Schubert's Serenade, does the accidental on the ornamental C at the beginning affect the "regular" C that follows?
18
votes
4answers
799 views

Why do we need note names like B♭, D♭ etc.? Why not use only A♯, C♯ and so on?

The very same sharp/flat tones can be written in two ways: C♯ is the same as D♭ D♯ is the same as E♭ …and so on This is so confusing. What is the reason for it? ...