2
votes
2answers
42 views

What makes each of the inversions of a major chord different in usage?

In some songs that I have listened, only one inversion could be used; when one tries to use other voicings, it will sound really odd. So, when it is more preferrable, for example, to use the second ...
6
votes
4answers
559 views

Is an inversion a different chord, or a different voicing?

If I play C4, E4, G4, it's a C-major chord. First inversion would be E4, G4, C5: is this considered a different chord, or just a different voicing of the same chord? I'm thinking specifically for ...
3
votes
3answers
210 views

How do I learn to detect chord voicing by ear?

When I hear music what I can consciously detect is the top melody note and the chord as a whole, for eg "that is a C sung over an A min". However, I am unable to detect how the chord is voiced, as in ...
5
votes
1answer
170 views

Sixth and Minor Seventh inversions conflicts

For example consider C6 [C-E-G-A] and Am7 [A-C-E-G] which share the same notes in different order. When we play [E-G-A-C] how is it called?(is this a inversion of C6 or Am7) Generally, how are these ...
10
votes
6answers
612 views

I need help understanding the concept of chord inversions.

This article from wikipedia, states: In the first inversion of a C major triad the bass is E—the 3rd of the triad—with the 5th and the root stacked above it (the root now shifted an octave ...