Sequences of chords, and the relationship of one chord to the next

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3
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4answers
293 views

“I-vi” in Major or “III-i” in Minor?

There are some progressions that seem to move back and forth between a major key and its relative minor, like the "I-vi" progression (C, Am for example, two measures each.) Most people would consider ...
0
votes
2answers
551 views

Help me in this chord progression analysis please [closed]

Verse is in G major key Then it comes bridge: Am B7 Em A7 Am D C And then a typical C lydian progression (G major again) for the chorus Id like to understand whhich modulations are occurring in the ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Learning how to be a good rhythm guitarist before becoming a lead guitarist, where to start?

I have recently been trying to hone in my improvisational skills. I'm stuck in the first position of the Am pentatonic box and can't move away from it. Whenever I try to move out of it, I randomize ...
2
votes
2answers
392 views

how does the bluegrass major chord built off of the flat 7 “work”?

It's in almost every bluegrass song, but I've never seen an exposition of the theory behind the major chord (minor may also be used, but I don't think I've seen it) built off of the flat 7th of the ...
0
votes
3answers
168 views

What left hand technique is being used to create this percussive chord transition sound?

There is a strange chord transition that I cannot figure out how to play near the beginning of this acoustic guitar song: ...
14
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3answers
2k views

How can I generate nice-sounding random chord progressions?

I'm trying to write a computer program to generate simple random chord progressions. Is there a way of ranking chords based on how nice they will sound after the previous ones? Any advice would be ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

What does it mean when progression is resolved?

I saw this text inside a very basic piano workbook in which I'm not sure what the author means by using "resolve". Progression #1: C-F-G-F-C NOTE: This 4 bar progression resolves back to C ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Why play out of scale notes as part of a chord?

So, I'm learning 'Stray Cat Strut' right now and came across something I'm not sure I understood. I have to say, I've only just begun to learn theory, so maybe that's why. Anyway, as far as I can ...
8
votes
1answer
635 views

What is this called? Why is it allowed?

"Golden Train" by Justin Nozuka (YouTube link below) is in the key of Ab major. However he uses a Cb major chord throughout the song, which is not in the key of Ab major. It sounds good and works ...
4
votes
3answers
507 views

Musical Harmony: When to use more than three chords

I understand that I, IV, and V chords in both major and minor keys are common chords that make up a good progression. I understand that those 3 chords cover all the notes diatonic to the key that we ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What is this chord (spelled 2nd, 4th, 5th) and how is it used?

For the piano/composers: I compose music for the piano in my spare time, and one particular chord that has caught my attention (as one that I like a lot) is the D-F-G chord in C Major. I have seen ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Playing the “fail” sound effect on a guitar?

I have looked around for the notes or chords to play the typical three note (wah wah wah) fail sound effect. I believe it's typically played on a trombone which gives it that great slide effect. In ...
5
votes
3answers
286 views

Composing a song in Cm with major chord substitutes

I am composing a song in Cm with a very basic chord progression of I-IV-I. So, normally, in Cm, that would be Cm7-Fm7-Cm7, but I am actually playing Cm7-F7-Cm7. First of all, why does this work? This ...
12
votes
6answers
533 views

My ear is not very well trained - what can I look for as easy hints when trying to identify a ii-V-I progression in blues music?

I'm looking to learn how to better analyze music I am listening to, and I'm having problems identifying ii-V-I progressions, especially when they're the basis for improvisation. What are some hints or ...
7
votes
2answers
314 views

In chord progressions, how can I refer to a chord that's out of the scale?

I'm training a music that is most on the G Major scale.. But then there's a B chord. As B is not on the G Major scale, how can I refer to it when I'm writing the chord progression? EDIT My guess is ...
3
votes
1answer
183 views

What is this chord progression? (youtube inside)

We are trying to cover this classic 1996 Eminem track "313" but for the life of me I cannot figure out this chord progression. I'm hoping someone can help! ...
8
votes
1answer
295 views

When was the deceptive cadence introduced?

Bach used the Deceptive Cadence as early as his Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, BWV 582, which dates to the early 18th century. Are there earlier uses? A definitive answer may be impossible, but I ...
4
votes
1answer
376 views

What's so special about III ?

Take a C major scale, and pick each other note, starting from each note C-D-EF-G-A-BC-D-EF I: C E G = C ii: D F A = Dm iii: E G B ...
0
votes
2answers
722 views

bass chord progressions in “Killing me softly”

This is kind of a follow up question to this question I have trancribes the bass line: The chords are: G7(no 3) - G - C - F- Dm - G - Am - A(single note) Which in roman numeral (if the scale is A ...
17
votes
1answer
714 views

Are there any machine-readable databases of chord progressions available?

I'm interested in doing some linguistics-inspired computational musicology on chord progressions and am wondering if there are any freely available databases of chord progressions. Obviously, I could ...
3
votes
1answer
530 views

Does the three chord trick always end a chord progression on the third chord?

It seems almost a redundant question, but the meat of it is this: If one is using the three chord trick, is it stylistically required by rules of theory and phrasing to end the progression on the ...