The name given to the distance between two pitches. Can be expressed in terms of relative scale degrees (minor 3rd, tritone, unison, octave) or exact ratios (3:2, 16:9, 5:4).

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8
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2answers
190 views

Why in the study of counterpoint by johan fux are minor sixths allowed but not augmented fifth?

If augmented fifths and minor sixths are enharmonically equivalent why does johan fux in his book study of counterpoint allow minor sixths but not augmented fifths if they sound the same? How does one ...
8
votes
4answers
998 views

Why is a minor 3rd consonant but an augmented 2nd dissonant?

I am currently reading the Jazzology and on the chapter per the consonant and dissonant intervals I came across this statement: while a minor 3rd is consonant, an augmented 2nd is dissonant. ...
3
votes
3answers
217 views

Ranking Interval Complexity

I would like to know the order of complexity of musical intervals (in a melody). I learned about this from an exposure to the Kodaly method, although I have not learned from nor taught using the ...
17
votes
3answers
2k views

Why are thirds used to construct chords?

I am (slowly) learning music theory on the guitar. I've begun learning about scales and chords, and it seems that all chords are built using some combination of thirds. For example, a minor triad is ...
3
votes
3answers
279 views

How often does each interval appear in the harmonic series (relative to the fundamental)?

For practical purposes, lets assume a limited harmonic series. How many harmonics are a fifth? How many a minor third? And so on. What intervals are commonly found in the harmonic series? What ...
5
votes
3answers
327 views

General procedure for determining the name of an interval given a major key / diatonic collection

I'm attempting to program a library that lets one make use of concepts from Peter Westergaard's tonal theory. The current problem I'm trying to solve is to determine the specific name of an interval ...
12
votes
3answers
260 views

What is this scale? [Root , +1 , +3 , +1 , +2 , +1 , +3 , +1 (Root again)]

Intervals (relative to previous note): Root , +1 , +3 , +1 , +2 , +1 , +3 , +1 (Root again) Example: A, Bb, C#, D, E, F, G# This scale is used often in Turkish Music. But I don't know if it has a ...
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votes
1answer
100 views

Question about music [closed]

musician, and I really love music... recently i have been listening to artist called avicii .. and I noticed that something special happens with him.. he is not playing regular notes .. his melodies ...
11
votes
6answers
260 views

Why aren't intervals zero-indexed?

Note: italics such as "2nd" refer to my proposed notation; existing notation is written without italics: "2nd". Why is the interval between C and D called a 2nd, as they are 1 note apart? Surely this ...
7
votes
5answers
352 views

Chords and Intervals - Unison

Just trying to wrap my head around intervals but I'm confused by Unison. If I am playing a chord on a piano, how do you play a Unison chord if you can't press the same key twice at the same time? ...
2
votes
2answers
918 views

Perfect pitch and tuning forks

Ok. So I consider myself to have pretty good pitch. If you give me a few seconds after you sound a note, I can tell you what the note is. I can also tune a timpani to any pitch using only my mouth ...
5
votes
2answers
167 views

What is the savart unit in Persian music theory?

i was heard about savart unit in persian music that divides a chromatic interval into smaller units. persian musicians using an interval smaller than the chromatic intervals, called: kron. they ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Does the bass note in a “slash” chord really have an associated interval?

I have a question about "slash" chords. Look at the chord E/G: E G♯ B G 1 3 5 ? G is the minor 3rd interval (♭3) in the key of E. However, I would have thought by definition chords cannot ...
4
votes
2answers
364 views

How do you label a sequential interval when the second note is lower in pitch than the first?

Consider the interval D3 G3. This would form a perfect fourth. In a sequential interval, say a quarter note D3 followed by quarter note G3, this still "sounds" like a perfect fourth so using that ...
6
votes
3answers
324 views