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11

Although the general principles are pretty much the same (set the relief of the neck, set the action of the strings, adjust the intonation, etc.), the short answer to your question is to set it up the best you can and learn to play the low B with a lighter touch. The longer answer involves scale length and string tension. What Is Scale Length? The scale ...


4

If, by soft, you mean less bright, then flat wound strings might be for you. I'd recommend Thomastik Jazz Flats, a little expensive, but they last a very long time. They sound wonderful, with a kind of throaty, singing voice, with just the right amount of thump, and more sustain than any other brand I tried. They made my cheap accoustic fretless bass sound ...


3

Depends what you want; for the real heavy stuff you could drop DEADG down a full tone to CDGCF. Or you could tune it to a chord like E major perhaps [E B E G# B], or flatten the third(G#) to make it an E minor [E B E G B]. You can tune to pretty much any chord which takes your fancy; however bear in mind that tuning to a chord may restrict your options ...


3

This is a really subjective question. If you like playing on a 5 string bass then by all means get a 5 string bass. You might even want to try a 6 string before making that decision. Use however many strings you are comfortable with. There really isn't an absolute answer. Any number of strings is good for any kind of music. In any standard configurations, ...


2

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't recommend this at all! Get it professionally done, as you have stated you could ruin the bridge that could create noise. I had a bass that was perfectly normal (2nd hand bass) but had the bridge filed down for lower action. Unfortunately it created a buzzing that drove me to just getting a new bass.


1

I had the same problem. I have a 2011 Fender American Deluxe Jazz V. I went to change the stock strings for a set of flat wounds. The B string is a 0.132, which is a big fat string. I can string through the body or through the bridge. Either way the wrapped end with the ball would not fit through either way leaving about an inch to go to get the ball at the ...


1

I just treat the five-string like a 6-string missing the high E. It's a lot easier than trying to figure out what notes to play on the B and makes for some super heavy sounding drop-D notes. Tune it in EADGB and either play standard or drop the D. Unlike the person who took the actual heavier string and put it in the 5th string position, just tune it like a ...


1

The Chapman Stick is an instrument with the same scale length as a bass guitar, and its bass strings are usually tuned in 5ths, such as C G D A E, like a cello one octave lower. Bass guitar soloist Michael Manring has used a range of alternate tunings for different pieces. On his Zon Hyperbass, he has a variable, calibratable "D-tuner" on each of the four ...


1

Five string double basses in symphony orchestras sometimes are tuned CEADG, with the idea that the lowest C corresponds to an octave below the celli's lowest note. However I beleive this is 'old school' and most players today use the BEADG tuning. (Some four string symphony orchestra double basses has a 'drop-C' neck extension feature on the E string.) ...



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