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15

Perfect Pitch has some different Definitions: There are different levels of perfect pitch and absolute pitch. They are all about being able to either identify or generate (i.e. sing) notes without a recent reference. People's ability range from being able to guess right some of the time, to instantly telling you which note is not being played when someone ...


12

Here's how I did it. Your mileage may vary. I had a junior high band director who would often tune the band by having each player in a section play a B-flat and telling them whether they were flat or sharp based on the electronic tuner at the front of the room. I made a bit of a game for myself by trying to guess (to myself) whether people were sharp or ...


11

I think a more realistic goal is to aim for relative pitch; then when you have that, perhaps try for perfect pitch. Relative pitch is essentially being able to recognise and identify intervals, relative to the root note. Gaining relative pitch is fairly easy, a good way to do it is to pick a simple Major scale ditty, play it, and identify the intervals in ...


10

I achieved a degree of absolute pitch (AP) as an adult, but of course this was not done in a controlled manner, so the scientific reliability of my case is implicitly questionable. Anyway, here's what happened: As a student who specialized in music in high school, and then pursued a Bachelor of Music degree in college, my path follows a pretty standard one ...


9

A few years ago I carried a tuning fork for a whole winter, and did notice improvement. The first week or so I would just bump the tuning fork and listen to the A. Then I started to try to guess before listening. Having the tuning fork with you all the time, you can practice whenever and as often as you want. It takes only a couple of seconds. I believe ...


6

I use David Lucas Burge's method for learning perfect pitch. I know many people who think that perfect pitch is something that cannot be learned, but within a few months of working with this method I have made tremendous progress: I can often recognize certain tones (for example F# and B), without using any kind of reference (i.e., without playing any note ...


5

I wrote a comment but I would like to expand a bit. First of all, the white and black keys are not major or minor by themselves. The black keys are simply some of the notes with single sharps or flats. So in C Major or Ionian, all of the white keys are in the scale. But A minor or Aeolian is also all white keys. A note can't be major or minor by itself- ...


5

Those numbers are a rough estimate, and only applies to US citizens. Wikipedia has a thorough overview of the relevant information, here. The most salient points: Absolute pitch seems to be a cognitive act. It's a property of our brains, and not our ears Most people exhibit some ability or sub-components of absolute pitch Absolute pitch appears to be ...


5

Your EDIT is the right track. What you described all falls under the category of Ear Training. Or better you would say: Brain Training. Because the whole purpose is to write down what you already have heard (or imagined) and maybe even can sing or play. As always: You have to train and you have to practice. And start simple. Better too simple than too hard. ...


4

A friend of mine wrote an article on developing perfect pitch for the New Jersey American Choral Director's Association. This article is an interesting read and is available, in pdf form, here (this link is now broken). In short, it says that perfect pitch is a form of tonal memory, and to develop this memory, he suggests listening to specific songs that ...


3

Pitching in here as someone that does have perfect pitch - however, I'm one of these people who has just always had it rather than sat down and learning it. It's as clear to me that the note being played is say an Ab than the folder currently to my right is green, and always has been. I don't profess to know this from some superhuman effort in training, it's ...


3

Yes, you can develop relative pitch through rote practice. But there are plenty of good courses out there that would likely save you a lot of time. Ultimately what you are learning is how to label what you are hearing and as such each person starts with their own strengths and weaknesses. As always combining multiple approaches tends to give the best ...


2

There is no way that I personally have perfect pitch, but I can offer some suggestions: Practice and hum scales so you know exactly what the notes sound like Learn songs and riffs by ear. This will really help you with recognising chords and notes Learn the notes on the fretboard, so you can put the note name to a fretted note that you hear Hope this ...


1

I've once listened to an interview of someone with AP. The one thing that stuck to me was that he was hearing notes the way we see colors. I.e. he can identify notes by hearing them, but he has a hard time to distinguish intervals. Can you tell me how big the difference between blue and green is? Well, that's how he perceived notes. And the comparison is ...


1

At the present level of science (can be summarised here, for instance), there is no obvious answer to this question. Human ear internally contains a huge number of stereocilia of variable length. They resonate just like strings (or maybe more like rods as seem attached from only one side) in response to any sound, and the brain receives information which ...


1

Before the discussions here, I thought that absolute pitch (AP from now on) was a given from birth to some lucky (or unlucky in some cases) individuals. From discussions and reading up on the subject, my understanding now is that it is related to early exposure to pitches and meaning attached to them. This could be childhood musical training, or languages ...


1

If you can tell you're not hitting the right pitch, you're off to a good start ;) It sounds like you need to spend some time on rudimentary arpeggios , scales and so on. Finding out what your range is would allow you to know when you're trying to sing out of it. The closer you are to the end of your range the harder it is to stay in pitch. If there ...


1

Take a well known tune that's usually played in a specific key.Just sing the first note. I use ( 'cos the wife watches and it's played 4 times in each episode )the theme from Coronation Street (U.K.) .It's a C over an Ab chord .Sing the note just before it's played, and soon you'll (hopefully) be very close. Every time I go past a piano, I sing the C, then ...


1

Like most people answering, I don't have perfect pitch but I'm "pitching in" anyway. There are various interpretations of perfect pitch, one of which could be considered a curse -- to know when a pitch is sharp or flat of a reference pitch you're accustomed to, by an amount that's not a whole number of semitones. Some people would hear a Jimi Hendrix ...


1

I found http://pianofundamentals.com/book/en/1.III.12 very useful. In short, mental play, or playing in your mind is very useful and can also be used as a way to learn perfect pitch.


1

Like Kyle Brandt said, a good exercise may be to try singing a pitch before you've heard it. Perhaps from a song, perhaps simply a note (say, a C) you would like to try, then play the note on a tuned instrument and see how far off you were, making sure to sing the note along with the tuned instrument. Perhaps if you then come back in an hour without ...


1

I have perfect pitch and have for as long as I can remember, but was nowhere near as developed as it is now. For the last couple of years in choir, I've been giving the starting pitches (instead of a pitch pipe). Although I'd always been able to produce and identify notes with enough thinking, it was hard and required a decent amount of thinking time before ...



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