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you can look at the "G# Maj." key in a couple of different ways, (1) as a disregarded, feared and denounced part of music and music theory, very much like the dreaded locrian and diminished modes - to be avoided at all cost. It's a theoretical problem much like arguing if there is such a key as B#/Cb Maj., E#/Fb Maj., in comparison to G# which is not at the ...


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Adding onto Sergio's excellent answer: There are multiple ways in which enharmonic notes (notes of essentially the same pitch with different names, such as A# and Bb) come into play, as it were. One is with respect to different tunings. Sergio's answer cites a table that concerns two tunings, equal and just. There are in fact lots and lots of tunings, many ...


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Enharmonic notes are different, e.g. G# and A-flat, even though it is not always the case that instruments make different sounds for these different notes. These different note names are used to indicate differences in terms of the melodic or harmonic content of the music. For example, in A minor, G# is frequently encountered as the "leading tone" back to ...



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