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The text above the staff merely specifies a single chord that should be used by accompanists for this bar. It doesn't change the key of the piece, which determines which accidentals are "understood" to apply to every note without having to repeat them in every bar. A key can be changed only by specifying a new key, i.e. writing a whole bunch of new ...


0

How would you propose we raise the leading tone of a# minor if not with the use of a double sharp? Sometimes notes with sharps in front of them also have to be raised by a semitone and this is where double sharps come in.


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Using G# harmonic minor as an example: the natural minor consists of G#, A#, B, C#, D#, E and F#. In order to create a harmonic minor, the 7th note, in this case F#, must be raised. This means that F# becomes Fx because in raising, the note preceeding the accidental symbol must remain the same - in other words, you can't have a G and a G# in the same scale ...


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No, a B marked with a single flat will only ever be a B-flat. Occasionally in written music you will see "courtesy accidentals", redundant accidentals meant to clarify or remind the player. These are are often used when a note was altered in a previous bar.


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No, a Bb is a Bb, no matter how many times you say so! One would be required if there had previously been a B natural, in the same octave, in the same bar. If it had been in a different octave, one (maybe in brackets) would seem sensible. In a preceding bar - use your common sense.


2

No, accidentals are always staff independent. The reason you have a Bb in at the beginning of the bar and a B natural at the end is because the Bb is pulling down to the A and the B natural is leading up to the C.


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In deciding whether an accidental should be printed, one should generally expect that people reading music will be blind to staffs that don't contain their part(s), and may be blind to music which they are not performing even when it shares a staff with music they are; one should add cautionary accidentals if necessary to ensure that such possible blindness ...


4

As Dom states, each and every stave is a separate entity, and accidentals need to be put in for each changed note. This is in D minor (at least here), and what's happening is the normal melodic minor trick of that era. Melodies going downwards would use a natural minor configuration, while those rising would have a raised 6th and 7th. Thus, Bbs in the left ...


2

No they do not. If you wanted to represent the accidental on a different staff you would need to write it in. Each staff is independent of the other even if they are linked as in your example.



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