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1

I agree with Slim. It's quite clear that the English Language translation of accidental implies that it is not on purpose. Therefore it's adaptation for referring to music notation is quite logically used to define an aberration or deviation from what is prescribed in the key signature. To call the sharp symbols or flat symbols in the key signature ...


1

Technically speaking, you can use any number of accidentals and occasionally it is appropriate to use double accidentals. Another thing to keep in mind is that a c sharp is NOT the same note as a d flat. They are only the same on a piano or other statically tuned instruments which have to use a single temperament to play all keys (there's probably a better ...


3

You can definitely encounter things like this for a variety of reasons. One place you would frequently see this is within a key such as D minor (1 flat); in common practice theory, the seventh degree is altered (when needed) to create a leading tone and within D minor, this would be C#. Other chromatic activity will also be best spelled out through #s even ...


5

As an example (this is fairly common) below is an excerpt from a Bagatelle in C minor by Beethoven (imslp link). Notice the F and C (!!) are sharpened. Also notice As and Es are natural. So what's happening here is that Beethoven is going outside the key for a bit, probably using borrowed chords (I'm not as fast an analyzer as I should be). Why does he ...


3

For accidentals, one often chooses to write a sharp if the next note moves upwards and a flat if it moves downward. For example, in G major, a Db would usually moved down to C and a C# move upwards to D. This avoids having a large number of naturals (C,C#,D vs C,Db,Dn for example.) Likewise, were the current chord an A major chord, C# would be preferred to ...



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