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6

There are a number of companies that provide recorded audio tracks of popular music of all sorts, from classical to jazz and pop music -- with the solo instrument or lead vocal part missing from the recording, so that you can play this part yourself with the recording as an accompaniment. Foremost among these companies is Music Minus One in the US, which ...


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It will be beneficial to learn some music theory. In that way you'll be able to identify repeating patterns (like the II-V-I chord progression). It is easier to memorize larger chunks, so learning how to identify patterns by e.g. chord function should make it easier.


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Start by imitating people whose style you like. Then you can use what you learn when you're making your own music. I listened to the video you posted and here is what I hear: Basic 2-beat pattern for 7 measures (if in 2/4) Simple fill (one note at a time, 3 or 4 notes in a row) for 1 measure Repeat with a different basic pattern I heard the following ...


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I like to write down my music in tab notation software such like Guitar Pro or Tuxguitar. Over time the collection of your own stuff will grow, and if you can browse through your songs simply by playing them back, it's a pretty good solution for me.


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What I do is: Compose the song Play it some times, so to be able to play it without much thinking write it down (as tab/notes whatever) (this helps me if I forget something after some time) Play it again and again on a daily basis. I think the last part is the most useful of all. You just have to play the song(s) over and over and over to remember them. ...


2

My cello teacher suggests this method for memorizing sheet music: 1) memorize the music in your mind, as sound 2) memorize the music as written on the page 3) memorize the physical motions (in my case, bowing and fingerings) 4) merge the three memorizations. This may not apply directly to lyrics, but it's worth a shot.


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Someone asked about a good way to remember song lyrics in this thread : Good way to remember lyrics when covering songs? I shan't repeat everything written there .. if you're playing an instrumental some of the techniques may still help! I've found that just listening to a song a lot so it's settled in your head works very well. Also there's a kind of ...


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I've found that using a different notated representation can help. In particular, sheet music often makes it hard to see the wood for the trees; the amount of detail can obscure larger patterns (repeated or trivially different phrases, elements of form, etc.) in lyrics, melody and harmony. The act of actually creating one or more "song maps" at coarser ...


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Practice. Not trying to be snarky, that's really just what needs to happen. Additionally, I find it helpful to try to dispense with sheet music as soon as possible. Playing songs as quickly as you can (even ones that are meant to be slow) helps force internalization. But the main thing is practicing. There's no substitute for that.


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MIDI Maestro is one professional system designed for this purpose. If you know someone who is an expert at the Ableton Live environment, you could construct something useful. There are also several musical theater-related companies that will rent you a turn-key system of computer and samplers with the entire orchestration for a particular hit musical or ...


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Standard MIDI Files In the early 1990s there were several commercial companies that licensed the rights to a lot of pop songs and made and sold libraries of Standard MIDI File sequencer data, which contained note-for-note recreations of the arrangements of hit pop songs played and programmed by keyboardists on MIDI controllers. The libraries were sold on ...



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