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My band, a three piece rock/techno/metal band, only uses drums from a machine. We did initially use live recorded drums, but for the type of music we play, we needed the rhythm section to have exact precision, to tie in with stage effects or video, for some events. So the entire rhythm section is generated within a DAW, using various tools, and synths and ...


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There are many reasons. Some genres (electronic, hip hop etc.) pretty much require an unrealistic, machine like drum sound and performance. For some other genres (rock, pop, metal etc.), using a well programmed sequencer provides 95% realism for a fraction of the cost. By 95%, I mean that 95% (maybe more) of your audience won't be able to tell the ...


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When composing or creating a melody line to go with your chord progression (harmony) your safest bet is to choose a chord tone for the first note played after or simultaneous with the chord change. A chord tone is any note contained in the underlying chord (one of the three in a triad or one of the four in a 4 note chord such as a 7th). But you can ...


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If you are playing solo, start by realizing that you are now the full band and you need to adapt your playing like so. Think of the drummer and the bass player as "navigators" on a ship, guiding the rest of the group. So the drummer keeps time and makes fills anticipating when a period is ending and another one is beginning and the bass player plays passing ...


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Music will vary slightly in tempo when played live, it's one of the facets that makes it what it is. Not untoward, but, well, human.That means that on a track, all subsequent parts need to be in time with the drums. Not so easy as following a click track, which dictates tempo exactly. Also, for editing, using bars to count rather than seconds/milliseconds is ...


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The Yamaha 'ABC' method is proprietary [& iirc patented] system, so you won't find exactly the same algorithms used in other devices or software. The method you are referring to is the 'easy-play' version of ABC. It uses a different, much simpler but less musically-accurate shorthand to play a much smaller selection of chord types [only major/mnior, ...


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Learn different two-handed voicings for the chords. Different inversions, different ways to voice the same chord. Pick up a copy of the "Piano Transcriptions" / "Piano comping" for one of the Jamey Aebersold play alongs. (Go to www.jazzbooks.com and in the search bar type those two search terms.) These are the note-for-note transcriptions of the piano ...


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Turn the question on its head. What are the chord progressions good for, if they aren't supporting a compelling melodic line? (That's not to say that there isn't a place for chords that exist in their own right, but a piece that is purely chordal throughout its length is a tour de force.) Chord progressions tend to be either melodic lines superposed on one ...


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This is a bit old-fashioned but still useful. (You can modify the ideas to fit your needs.) https://ia802605.us.archive.org/16/items/exercisesinmelo00goetgoog/exercisesinmelo00goetgoog.pdf To some extent, the general pattern of melodies are just moving up and down scale lines and arpeggios. The book above does give some exercises you can try to see the ...


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My tip - hope it's accurate as it seems to work for me For dynamic mics go with a cardioid dynamic mic instead of a supercardioid mic - the reason is that supercardioid mics have a smaller pattern to pick up your voice which is great for a standing vocalist who wants to reject ambient noise and for feeback suppresion on stage. For a singing pianist who ...


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I suggest that you play the last bar of the first song, then immediately play the introduction of the second. If there isn't an introduction, use the last two or four bars of that song. Don't over-think this. They don't want a gap, but they ARE two different songs, in different tempos. At some point the music will have to change. Just do it!



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