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14

IMO frequently broken strings indicate a mechanical problem. I never break strings and I haven'tt broken one for maybe 30 years. Causes include: Too-sharp edge on nut or saddle. burr or sharp edge on a tuning post, or the hole though same. Nut slots cut too wide (or maybe you installed lighter strings) allowing the string too much side-to-side movement. ...


13

First, I agree with the question, when talking about nylon-stringed guitars - in nearly a half-century of playing classical and flamenco instruments, I find that the D string, the poor thing, breaking more frequently than any the others (other answers and comments are probably based on steel-stringed experience). I've asked luthiers, and even one of the ...


13

Neck width - and hence the distance between strings Neck thickness - affects the distance from thumb to fretting finger Fret height - affects how far past the fret you need to press in order to touch the fingerboard. Although note that actually touching the fingerboard is not necessary. Action - the distance from the string to the fingerboard. Action can be ...


12

The reason we have wound strings is due to the physics of the string's vibration. A heavier string vibrates more slowly, causing a lower pitch. The wound strings could be solid wires, and achieve the pitch we need, however getting it to bend correctly across the bridge and nut, be easily fretted, AND be tunable, would be difficult. Imagine trying to do a ...


12

There are many, many scenarios here, but I will cover a couple of basic ones to get you started. When recording an acoustic guitar, you in essence three options. I'll enumerate those, and then go through some basic questions to hopefully get you moving. Use an Acoustic/Electric guitar and plug it into a recording interface of some kind. Mike an Acoustic ...


12

There's absolutely nothing wrong with using a PA speaker cabinet, especially if you plan to play amplified acoustic instruments through the rig. It might even produce a better overall sound with these. Guitar cabinets are designed for a very specific purpose - electric guitar amplification and thus have their construction optimised for this purpose. They ...


12

Basically it comes down to whether you strum all the time, whether you finger-pick, or whether you want a guitar that is good for both. Your body diagram in your question has guitars arranged by body size, but it also represents a continuum of musical styles. On the left, the parlor guitar has the most delicate sound and is the best suited for fingerstyle ...


12

Just to be clear, what you have are ball-end nylon strings, right? Because if you're planning on putting steel strings on a classical guitar, I'll have to advise you against moving forward. The instrument is not built for steel string tension. If they are nylon strings, on a standard classical guitar, Frets.com has a tutorial on the right way to restring ...


11

You say in your update this happens despite using a pick - in which case I would say the most appropriate solution is a slight change of technique. Using a pick, my nails never come into contact with the strings, despite using a fairly short amount of pick beyond my thumb/fingers. For songs where I want to use my thumb to create pinch harmonics I pull the ...


11

Yes, this is probably true. As you play a new guitar (or other wooden instrument), the fibers in the wood settle somewhat due to the vibration, and over time this causes the wood to become stiffer, more stable, and more resonant, which in turn improves the sound. Different woods experience this phenomenon differently; for example, spruce takes about a year ...


10

I pretty much agree with everything in that video, except not everyone is as lucky to have an automated winder :) So here is what I do (on an acoustic guitar, anyway): After removing the old string and fitting the new string: I slide the end of the string through the post, until it is taut, and then pull it back so that it has 1-2 inches of slack. I then ...


9

Pre-war Martins were built using Brazilian Rosewood for their back and sides, which is highly prized both for its look and its sound. But because it's so beautiful, it was also heavily used in the furniture industry as well (I've seen some enormous conference-room tables made of Brazilian Rosewood, and they knocked my socks off), and as a result it was ...


9

When it comes to guitar strings, there are basically 2 main types: Wound and plain. Wound strings have a 'core' string of one material (usually steel), and have another length of metal string that is wound around that core. The most common material that the winding string is made of is usually phosphor bronze/plain bronze. The winding produces the ...


9

You can do that by pushing/pulling your neck. It's easy to do on electrics and basically if you push the neck forward you will loosen the tension of the strings which will give you a lower pitch. If you pull the neck towards yourself you will get a higher pitch. Newer seen anybody do that on an acoustic before... On an electric it is quite common, at least i ...


9

Usually when you restring an acoustic guitar, it will feel, and play, slightly different for a while. New strings that are fresh on the guitar tend to feel a little firmer and heavier to the fingers, but as time goes by they will start to feel a little less tense as they begin to stretch. Are you absolutely sure that they are the same gauge strings? The ...


9

Yup, probably. A few reasons I say this: In my experience, the biggest strength of Yamaha musical instruments is consistency -- to see something that looks handwritten is a pretty big red flag. You haven't mentioned a serial number at all. I assume that if there was one, you would include it. One aspect of that consistency is that every single genuine ...


8

IMHO, it's generally not a good idea to buy an acoustic/electric that lists for anything less than $1000. Why? Because no matter how much the guitar costs, some of what you're paying for in an acoustic/electric are the pickups and electronics. In other words, a $500 acoustic guitar is a $500 acoustic guitar, but a $500 acoustic/electric is really a $400 ...


8

The nut and saddle simply act as conduits for the vibration of the strings to the body of the guitar--so their effect on the tone of the instrument is pretty small. Other people may tell you different though ;). An acoustic guitar lives and dies by the geometry of the instrument--and the majority of the sound is projected from the sound hold and the top as ...


8

From this and your other questions, it seems you're confused about pitch, tension, string gauge and tone. Pitch is a function of: the gauge of the string (thinner = higher pitch) the tension of the string (more tension = higher pitch) the length of the string (shorter = higher pitch) Let's assume the length of your instrument is fixed and not something ...


8

Your guitar looks pristine for being 20 years old compared to my dinged up 1970 Gibson J45. Personally all the dings in the picture seem somewhat less likely to be a problem than ding #1 which makes me wonder how far that crack goes and if it extends unseen to under the bridge. The first question I think that you should ask is, "does this instrument have ...


8

There's a couple of things you can try: Angle the microphone a bit downwards. This shouldn't affect the sound too much (which largely depends on the horizontal position, not so much on vertical angle) but slightly reduce the breathing loudness. Use another polar pattern, figure-8 or at least supercardoid. These of course sound notably different (but not ...


8

All other things being equal, you may have a guitar which should be very easy to play, but it is out of calibration. This situation can be improved. In my experience a lot of guitarists, particularly amateur ones, do not appreciate the importance of the professional setup. How high the strings are above the frets and fingerboard, and how much strength in ...


8

We refer to the different sizes of strings as the "gauge" or "thickness". You should probably replace your strings with the same gauge strings that are on your guitar already. If you change the gauge of strings, it will change the tension on the neck, and this might require that the instrument be adjusted by a technician--this is called a "setup" and it ...


8

Assuming that the strings are not worn out, the two most common causes of a guitar with proper intonation developing problems with intonation would be: A change in the amount of "relief" or bow in the neck. The bridge beginning to come unglued or separating from the top. These problems can be caused by the expansion and contraction of the wood in the ...


8

Stickers will change the sound a little, making it less rich, duller. However, since they are already stuck, you may well create a bigger problem as you remove them. The adhesive may already have spoiled the finish in the guitar's body, so removing them will leave you with a tarnished (at least) front. If they've been there a while, the wood under them may ...


7

There is a balance between the strings and the top. If you put too much tension, it'll sound awesome until the top snaps or the bridge comes flying off. If you don't put enough tension, you don't get the top moving and it doesn't sound good. Nylon strings are for classical guitars and vice versa. There are silk-and-steel strings from string makers like ...


7

Steel strings are under higher tension than nylon, so, whether they are round-wound, flat-wound or taped, they will still require greater pressure to fret and pick. You can go to a lighter gauge, which will reduce the pressure needed, but your sound will become brighter, and the bass response of the guitar will be reduced; you're moving less metal, which ...


7

It is good to note that the difference between an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar. The acoustic guitar is the full instrument. The electric guitar is only one half of an instrument, the electric guitar and the electric guitar amplifier is the full instrument. The electric guitar signals are raw and needs to be processed by the electric guitar ...



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