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22

As others have noted, the properties of the signal from the microphone and from the piezo pickup will be different. The microphone picks up the same kind of air vibrations your ear does. The piezo pickup picks up the vibration of the saddle. The pickup has the advantage of being less susceptible to (but not immune to) feedback, and it moves with the guitar. ...


18

When you're dead. Seriously, though. Pick up that guitar. You're already better than the guy who didn't.


17

Yup, probably. A few reasons I say this: In my experience, the biggest strength of Yamaha musical instruments is consistency -- to see something that looks handwritten is a pretty big red flag. You haven't mentioned a serial number at all. I assume that if there was one, you would include it. One aspect of that consistency is that every single genuine ...


15

First, I agree with the question, when talking about nylon-stringed guitars - in nearly a half-century of playing classical and flamenco instruments, I find that the D string, the poor thing, breaking more frequently than any the others (other answers and comments are probably based on steel-stringed experience). I've asked luthiers, and even one of the ...


15

The name for the noise you're hearing is "string noise".


15

Basically it comes down to whether you strum all the time, whether you finger-pick, or whether you want a guitar that is good for both. Your body diagram in your question has guitars arranged by body size, but it also represents a continuum of musical styles. On the left, the parlor guitar has the most delicate sound and is the best suited for fingerstyle ...


14

There's absolutely nothing wrong with using a PA speaker cabinet, especially if you plan to play amplified acoustic instruments through the rig. It might even produce a better overall sound with these. Guitar cabinets are designed for a very specific purpose - electric guitar amplification and thus have their construction optimised for this purpose. They ...


14

IMO frequently broken strings indicate a mechanical problem. I never break strings and I haven'tt broken one for maybe 30 years. Causes include: Too-sharp edge on nut or saddle. burr or sharp edge on a tuning post, or the hole though same. Nut slots cut too wide (or maybe you installed lighter strings) allowing the string too much side-to-side movement. ...


13

You say in your update this happens despite using a pick - in which case I would say the most appropriate solution is a slight change of technique. Using a pick, my nails never come into contact with the strings, despite using a fairly short amount of pick beyond my thumb/fingers. For songs where I want to use my thumb to create pinch harmonics I pull the ...


13

Just to be clear, what you have are ball-end nylon strings, right? Because if you're planning on putting steel strings on a classical guitar, I'll have to advise you against moving forward. The instrument is not built for steel string tension. If they are nylon strings, on a standard classical guitar, Frets.com has a tutorial on the right way to restring ...


13

Neck width - and hence the distance between strings Neck thickness - affects the distance from thumb to fretting finger Fret height - affects how far past the fret you need to press in order to touch the fingerboard. Although note that actually touching the fingerboard is not necessary. Action - the distance from the string to the fingerboard. Action can be ...


12

The reason we have wound strings is due to the physics of the string's vibration. A heavier string vibrates more slowly, causing a lower pitch. The wound strings could be solid wires, and achieve the pitch we need, however getting it to bend correctly across the bridge and nut, be easily fretted, AND be tunable, would be difficult. Imagine trying to do a ...


12

There are many, many scenarios here, but I will cover a couple of basic ones to get you started. When recording an acoustic guitar, you in essence three options. I'll enumerate those, and then go through some basic questions to hopefully get you moving. Use an Acoustic/Electric guitar and plug it into a recording interface of some kind. Mike an Acoustic ...


12

You should not use a pop filter when recording instruments, unless the instrument is air-powered and your mic is in the line of fire (and if that's the case, there may be better mic placement options). The pop filter is meant to be as aurally transparent as possible, but it is indeed an obstruction that you are introducing between the instrument and the mic ...


11

I pretty much agree with everything in that video, except not everyone is as lucky to have an automated winder :) So here is what I do (on an acoustic guitar, anyway): After removing the old string and fitting the new string: I slide the end of the string through the post, until it is taut, and then pull it back so that it has 1-2 inches of slack. I then ...


11

Exapanding Daryl Answer - here goes fretboard diagram with octave shapes: Circle marks all "e" notes in standard tunning. Of Course You can move whole shape up and down the neck for other notes. This how to practice it: Locate note Follow arrows to locate next position and so on ... You can focus on note names on 6th and 5th string at start, and the ...


11

Yes, this is probably true. As you play a new guitar (or other wooden instrument), the fibers in the wood settle somewhat due to the vibration, and over time this causes the wood to become stiffer, more stable, and more resonant, which in turn improves the sound. Different woods experience this phenomenon differently; for example, spruce takes about a year ...


10

The first thing you want to work is the independence between your thumb and fingers. There is a video of Tommy Emmanuel on Youtube explaining how to do this, and it's actually what got me started. Back ago, I wrote some sort of thumbpicking tutorial, in Portuguese (with examples in a SoundCloud set), which tells you to do more or less the same things that ...


10

String tension is probably the most important factor, dictated by the gauge and tuning mainly. The action will affect how hard or easy the strings are to press, as a high action means further to move. The neck itself will have some bearing on this as a deep neck uses up more of your hand thus grip. A thin neck - both back to front and side to side, will ...


10

The sound from a microphone inside the guitar (or piezo pickups as in the case with Clapton) is different from the sound outside of the guitar. The signal from internal microphones or pickups will be more consistent, since it is not affected by movements of the guitar. Likely the signals are mixed to get the best of both worlds.


9

Pre-war Martins were built using Brazilian Rosewood for their back and sides, which is highly prized both for its look and its sound. But because it's so beautiful, it was also heavily used in the furniture industry as well (I've seen some enormous conference-room tables made of Brazilian Rosewood, and they knocked my socks off), and as a result it was ...


9

When it comes to guitar strings, there are basically 2 main types: Wound and plain. Wound strings have a 'core' string of one material (usually steel), and have another length of metal string that is wound around that core. The most common material that the winding string is made of is usually phosphor bronze/plain bronze. The winding produces the ...


9

You can do that by pushing/pulling your neck. It's easy to do on electrics and basically if you push the neck forward you will loosen the tension of the strings which will give you a lower pitch. If you pull the neck towards yourself you will get a higher pitch. Newer seen anybody do that on an acoustic before... On an electric it is quite common, at least i ...


9

Usually when you restring an acoustic guitar, it will feel, and play, slightly different for a while. New strings that are fresh on the guitar tend to feel a little firmer and heavier to the fingers, but as time goes by they will start to feel a little less tense as they begin to stretch. Are you absolutely sure that they are the same gauge strings? The ...


9

It is good to note that the difference between an acoustic guitar and an electric guitar. The acoustic guitar is the full instrument. The electric guitar is only one half of an instrument, the electric guitar and the electric guitar amplifier is the full instrument. The electric guitar signals are raw and needs to be processed by the electric guitar ...


9

We refer to the different sizes of strings as the "gauge" or "thickness". You should probably replace your strings with the same gauge strings that are on your guitar already. If you change the gauge of strings, it will change the tension on the neck, and this might require that the instrument be adjusted by a technician--this is called a "setup" and it ...


9

Strings gauged at 0.011 and 0.012 differ in diameter by 0.001 inches. Strings for guitar are usually sold in sets and named after the lightest string in the set, so the implication is that, in a set of "elevens", all the strings will be thinner than the corresponding strings in a set of "twelves". Different manufacturers have different combinations with ...


8

IMHO, it's generally not a good idea to buy an acoustic/electric that lists for anything less than $1000. Why? Because no matter how much the guitar costs, some of what you're paying for in an acoustic/electric are the pickups and electronics. In other words, a $500 acoustic guitar is a $500 acoustic guitar, but a $500 acoustic/electric is really a $400 ...


8

The nut and saddle simply act as conduits for the vibration of the strings to the body of the guitar--so their effect on the tone of the instrument is pretty small. Other people may tell you different though ;). An acoustic guitar lives and dies by the geometry of the instrument--and the majority of the sound is projected from the sound hold and the top as ...



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