New answers tagged

1

How should I choose the right pick thickness...? The best way to choose the right pick for you (since it's all about personal preference and your particular playing style and guitar setup) is to buy a variety of single picks and try them out. Go to a music store and ask about single picks. They often have a plastic box with dividers and a huge variety ...


1

In my opinion, thickness of pick does not matter all that much. Maybe it's because of the extra light strings that you're using that you do not like the sound you're getting? Imho, string thickness changes your tone more than pick thickness. The answer that Rockin Cowboy wrote was really good and exhaustive, but was maybe overcomplicating things: just try ...


3

Distortion and overdrive is done by clipping the signal. So there really isn't a way to recreate this exact sound without some kind of electronic device altering the sound. This article shows some simple wave forms and what distortion looks like. http://www.howtogeek.com/64096/htg-explains-how-do-guitar-distortion-and-overdrive-work/ Resonator guitars ...


1

Pick style and thickness and material are largely a matter of personal preference. You should try many different type picks to see what works best for you. As your playing skills evolve, your choice of pick may change. I will talk about different type picks but also want to touch on some ideas on how you might use a pick as part of your strumming ...


1

This is entirely down to your own preference - there is no "best" If you don't like a 0.5, try a 0.75 for a bit and see if you prefer that. I find I like different thickness picks for different types of playing on different guitars, but my choice is different to my friends' pick choices.


0

Recording your guitar playing is an excellent way to improve your playing. Listening to a recording of yourself will highlight the areas you need to improve more effectively than just hearing yourself while playing. It is also a great way to share your music with others through many on line formats. Joseem gave you some great options. I know you are ...


1

This will be an opinion based answer, not strictly factual, but my answer is: Yes. The quality of beginner's guitars these days (compared to the trashy 1980s when I started) is pretty good, especially from established brands. An off the shelf model like this should be absolutely fine for anyone learning. Regarding the higher brand guitars: you do not need ...


2

There are many possible answers depending on your budget and purpose. I'll lay out three basic Laptop PC with recording program. If you a have a laptop with embedded microphone, you may already have everything that you need, at least to start. Use a program like Sound Recorder (bundled with windows) or the opensource multitracking audio workstation ...


-2

Firstly - you haven't said if you are strumming an acoustic or rocking a shred-tastic electric; if it is the latter I agree with the previous comments to get the action set correctly - 6mm is high! if you play bass you could try round wound ground down or nylon wound - also check out super slinky strings - Finally there is a super product out there called ...


0

Only fret the string with enough pressure to make the chord. I have had students with this problem and I tell them to lighten up a bit on the strings when making a chord. If you push too hard on the strings, your fingers will hurt, no matter how long you have been playing. Once you get use to the new pressure of your fingers Your fingers will feel a lot over ...


0

While a light gauge requires less pressure, it is also more cutting, especially if the action is too high. I'm thinking, for example of the difference between a thin versus a thicker, blunter blade--the former will slice more easily. Definitely see about getting a better guitar, as the action sounds high. A better made guitar will have a flatter neck that ...


0

1) Switch to nylon ("classical guitar") strings. The tension required to tune nylon is less, and the material is softer than steel strings. Won't work for electric, but if you like or were playing acoustic, ... 2) Switch to a ukulele: super low-tension strings. 3) Switch to bass. Big fat strings. 4) Acoustic bass strings are stupid thick and soft; ...


3

The three things that are likely to cause you pain at this stage are: string gauge: thick strings will require more pressure to fret them pressing too hard: a common problem when learning is putting far too much pressure on the strings. You only need to touch them to the fret (see people like Ritchie Blackmore using scalloped neck guitars, where the string ...


14

Not knowing what the action is like on your guitar, it's difficult. You need to make the action - the distance between the strings and the fretboard - as low as possible, so the strings don't need pressing far.But not so close that they buzz. Also, you may well be pressing TOO hard, it shouldn't be necessary to squeeze too much, just enough to stop fret ...


1

Ways to Fix the buzzing sound on your Guitar Note: Any loose part on your guitar may buzz audibly, when certain notes are played. Say, suppose you knock on the body of the guitar and the buzz appears to come from the neck, then there’s probably something loose on the neck or headstock. If the noise or the buzz occurs only when you tap on the back, there’s ...


1

There are several possible sources of buzzing on a guitar (or any stringed instrument). If you're good with tools and not afraid of ruining your guitar you could try to fix it yourself; otherwise take it to a qualified person. The most usual reasons for buzzing strings on a guitar are: one or more frets are too high or too low, which can be a problem ...


0

I agree with the answers above. In addition, an advantage of a soundhole pickup with magnetic pickups is that you can use electric guitar effects. This is especially important when you are using distortion, overdrive and even wah. Using electric guitar effects beyond chorus and reverb on a transducer (piezo) signal is a sure way to get extreme squealing ...


0

Honestly, the only solution is to continue to play. Your fingers will develop calluses and stop hurting after a few weeks (for some people it may be a couple months, it varies). Just make sure that after you have developed your calluses, you continue to play, because after a few days of not playing they will deteriorate and go away, leaving you at square one ...


2

If you have a desire to gain the ability to plug your guitar into and amplifier or PA system so that its sound can be amplified without using a microphone - you have numerous options. One of those options (not the best for everyone) is a sound hole pickup. I will limit this answer to the discussion of sound hole pickups and the different types and some ...


7

As you have discovered, you can play guitar without using your pinkie, but doing so will limit you to a great extent and certain chord voicings cannot be played without using the pinkie. Therefore I would strongly encourage you to begin incorporating the use of your pinkie into your playing. Many beginning guitarist tend to avoid using the pinkie because ...


3

A sound hole pickup is temporary and allows an acoustic guitar to be amplified without a microphone and without a potentially expensive and invasive modification to the guitar. It's also cheaper to buy and use a sound hole pickup than to have a pickup installed in an acoustic. A sound hole pickup usually sounds very different from a piezo-electric (the most ...


2

Assuming you're right handed (reverse answer if otherwise ): Not using right hand pinkie: perfectly normal, it would be awkward if you did, unless playing some flamenco style "rasgeado". Not using left hand pinkie: rather limitative for chord shapes, specially using barres (is that the word?) . But I've known of pretty good guitarists with some sort of ...


10

I can think of two different things. First, a "sound-hole pickup", a device that allows you to mount magnetic pickups onto/into a guitar so that it can be amplified without using a microphone. Second, feedback suppressor -- a device that dampens the resonance of the guitar so that it does not feed back when being played at high volumes. Sometimes these ...


1

If you mean inside the body of an acoustic guitar, you should put nothing in there and leave the wood open. If it's a low-end guitar, it's likely nothing you do will make much of a difference, since laminated woods usually do not age the same way and can't be reconditioned like solid woods can be. Steps you can take to care for the inside of an acoustic ...


2

Everyone is different in terms of motivation, natural ability, physical anatomy, and ability to assimilate information based on various learning mediums. So I can't definitively say how well you will do learning to play guitar in the absence of a teacher who can assess and evaluate your current skill level and show you how to get from where you are today to ...


1

You can definitely teach yourself, especially with the range of tutorials on YouTube etc. That said, the value of a teacher is inestimable at various stages: in early learning, a teacher will ensure you don't pick up bad habits later to get past blocks to your progression even later to add skills from other disciplines at any time to add theory and ...


2

Absolutely. I taught myself to play guitar when I was 15, and I didn't even own a guitar :) I drew a fretboard on some cardboard so I could practice chord fingerings. When our daughter wanted to learn guitar, she asked us for some lessons. We said no, on the reasonable basis that we both know how to play guitar. Eventually the need in her to play guitar ...


2

Of course you can. I have taught myself to play drums and guitar. Teachers are nice because they have perspective that you don't, and can save you a lot of energy in the mistakes that young players will make. Keep on keepin' on. If you do decide to take a lesson or some, you will have your own perspective of what you have learned to bring to the table.


3

It takes time to get the technique. The best tip I can give if you don't know this already is not to lay your index finger totally flat but to roll it round slightly so that it is the bony side, rather than the fleshy pad of the finger pressing down. For F shape barre chords there is trick for avoiding them altogether (Jimi Hendrix reportedly did this) - ...


2

If the strings buzz on the frets when you play the chord you should check a few things: Are you applying enough pressure on each string? Are you applying the pressure in the correct location? Is your finger pushing down straight? 1. As Tetsujin mentioned in his comment, you might not have the strength to push hard enough. This will come given enough ...


1

Yes, virtually any change will affect guitar tone. But the idea that sound comes from the sound hole is a myth. Holes do not produce sound. A guitar is like a speaker. The sound board is like the cone. The sound hole is like the port. The size of the sound hole has a great effect on the tone because it directly affects the air resonance of the ...


2

My original style was electric blues, and this has changed over the years to jazz standards, and solo jazz guitar. For both styles I prefer heavy gauge strings, and for blues the bigger strings combined with higher action really helps the tone when bending the strings. You have the added advantage of building up strength in your hands and fingers, because a ...


7

TL;DR The short answer (thanks, @RockinCowboy!) is that usually you want your action as low as possible, without hearing any fret-buzz, especially if you are just starting with guitar. Now the longer answer... There are advantages to both a higher and lower action on a guitar. In fact, it is often appropriate to have a higher or lower action depending upon ...


0

I have the same guitar!(YAMAHA f310) and i had the same problem ! .. The original strings are meduim .. They are really hard to play as a beginner and may hurt your fingers . As i told you i had the same problem but i got rid of buzzing sound by changing strings to Extra Light and re settingup my guitar :) Good Luck .


4

By changing to lighter strings you reduce the tension on the neck. The truss rod in your guitar is designed to counter the tension exerted by the strings. The strings bend it forward (in a concave arc like a smile). The truss rod bends the neck in the opposite direction - backwards (in a convex arc like a frown). Too much of a forward bend (smile) will ...


0

Moving to lighter strings will have reduced the string tension, so this has two direct effects that could cause your buzz: if you have a tremolo (this guitar dues not, so ignore this section) it will have moved backwards, so on most floating tremolos this means your strings will be closer to the body of the guitar, which will result in buzzing. This is ...



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