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1

As with many questions asked here, the answer is practice; lots of practice. The simplest way to practice is to play songs -- sing or whistle if you like; you don't need to sing well if you're practising in private. By playing actual songs, you learn functional sets of chords that work together, and the way your left hand can shift from one of these to ...


1

After practising at the weekend I'm going to add another answer myself that I found useful :o) Practice on the guitar, but with muted strings rather than playing a chord; it helped me focus on one thing - the speed, power and consistency of the right hand - without the distraction of worrying about whether the notes sounded right. It also made it much ...


0

If the bottom of your saddle is not flat or too tight this will occur. You can true the bottom up with a plate of glass and some sandpaper checking it with a straight edge and good light. You can also adjust the fit with a scraper or the sandpaper and glass. Typically a saddle should be very snug fit into the bridge but with an under the saddle pickup it ...


2

I feel your frustration! But it is a normal part of learning to play guitar. One reason so many aspiring new guitarist, give up before they ever get to a point where they feel a sense of reward and accomplishment, is that learning guitar involves overcoming several difficult challenges thrown at you all at once in the very beginning. First you have ...


4

Tim's answer is great, so I simply wanted to add a few things. These aren't specifically related to building strength and speed away from the guitar, but should give you some more options and help your R.H. to become more agile. By keeping your hand still as you execute a rasgueado, you are able to easily play different rhythmic variations of the basic ...


3

Use a very tight fist, and flick each finger out, most seem to start with pinky. Do it slowly and controlled at first, making sure to hit all the strings with equal force. Do not move your arm/wrist/hand until all four fingernails have 'rasgued'.


4

*Try to think hard about where your fingers have to move from/to. With C - Am, for example, two fingers (4th and 2nd strings) don't need to move off their frets. *Try to move a pair of fingers together, as in Em - Am,keeping them touching each other as they move across between strings. When you learn E, then A, you leave your index finger on the 3rd string ...


1

Partly, it just takes time to learn the shapes, such that you think "E minor" and your fingers "just go" to that shape. It might take a long time, but you'll get there with practice. Just keep doing it while you're watching TV etc. A couple of months isn't that long to have been learning. Also, it's good to make sure you are getting your wrist and elbow ...


1

I have started learning guitar basics,since last couple of months. I am facing huge difficulty in shifting chords. Welcome to the guitar. Any tips will be really helpful. Welcome to the guitar. That's really all there is to it. Chord shapes take mental effort and motor coordination for you right now and there is nothing that will help other than ...


2

Let me answer the original question: "How do you call guitar technique for playing one instrument, but making it sound like there are at least two guitars?" You call it "good". It is not as much a technique but rather sufficient mastery and control of the instrument in order to execute multiple simultaneous parts or voices with a separate identity. ...


1

It is definitely a Travis Picking style as well as Tommy has got a Hemi installed his hands! The guy is just fast as all get out. Here is a link to the tab of his live version of the song: http://www.tabpigs.org/artists/te/classical_gas.pdf . You might be able to study it and work on sections. As for what exercises would be good to practice, I'm not quite ...


1

I don't have arthritis, but this may be applicable: I have had for many years suffered recurrent RSI in my left wrist when it is bent over, which when it is bad makes playing more than a couple barre chords in succession impossible, and even on a good day limits what I am capable of barring. My solutions were: Primarily - play fingerstyle pretty much ...


2

The gypsy right hand technique revolves mostly around the so-called 'rest stroke'. The wrist is bent naturally, the upper arm rests on the top of the guitar. Every time a different string is hit, it's always a down stroke. The down stroke will rest on the string above it, hence, the 'rest stroke'. Down strokes are predominant. The action originates from ...


1

The chords/tuning sounding incorrect can be due to a few things. If the "action" (height of strings) is very high it can cause some notes to go sharp when playing a chord, because the extra tension of pushing down the string makes the string tighter. Or the bridge might be in the wrong place - I suspect this especially, because you said the bridge had beem ...


0

Obviously for each string which will have relatively different fret placement, you will either have to make a digital jump (such as a hammer-on), or accellerate an analog slide, which means non-uniform sliding and lots of crazy microtonal intervals occurring. That's a matter of choice. Notice though I said 'relatively' different fret placement. This is all ...


0

They can be avoided by using the retunings suggested in this question What guitar tunings allow chords without fretting between live strings? Otherwise your option is to avoid notes and strings in the first place, which would substantially compromise your versatility and/or force you to adopt (possibly overly) colorful alternative voicings.


1

Lower the action as much as you can without fret buzz Try a lighter gauge set of strings Re-set your bridge intonation for the new gauge strings so its not out of tune when you play barre chords Don't try press all the strings down with the barre finger just the outsides Some people curl the finger ever so slightly, look for the least pressure position that ...


2

I like to avoid them. Here are some chord boxes for alternatives to normal barre chords. First off, on electric guitar and sometimes on acoustic you can change your hand position and put your thumb over the top, which you can also use to fret, along with a mini-barre on the first two strings: I don't find the thumb AND mini-barre comfortable but I pretty ...


1

Avoiding them might prove to be an interesting exercise. You could base what you play on a barre shape and pick out notes from it, typically one note per set of two strings,getting three voices which will most often spell the whole chord and sometimes imply it. For instance, instead of a barre G chord, you could play the root on the low E, the third on the G ...


7

I'm not sure whether this is the same as topo morto's answer - but it starts off similarly. Best bet: Cheat! You don't have to play all 6 strings. In fact rarely is there an advantage. Eg if you play an E-shaped barre chord, you could just fret the thickest 4 strings. That means you get a nice full sound and in fact it's no longer a barre chord - you can ...


3

It is possible to avoid barres by playing only as many strings as you can fret with individual fingers. For example, for E- and A- shape barres, you can often just play the root of the note with the barre finger, and not include the top notes. Edit : other answers have made good suggestions about checking your guitar setup; I would suggest that a ...


3

A capo will, in some instances, avoid using barre chords. For example, instead of playing the sequence C F G, where F needs to be barred, a capo on the 3rd fret would need the chords A D and E (shapes) to be used to remain in the same key. The voicing would be slightly different, but to a singer it would be fine.


1

I do that sort of thing regularly. That's why I prefer coated strings on my acoustics. They don't make as much noise when I slide. When changing between chords which don't use the same shape the easiest thing to do technically speaking is to slide on whichever strings the two shapes have in common. As Dr Mayhem suggested, the root, third and or ...


0

You can only really slide when fingers remain on the same string between the chords, obviously. So a real slide can only occur between the notes of the two chords that are played with the same finger on the same string. E.g., if you want to slide from F major (1st position of d-g-b) to an Eb major (3rd position of d-g-b), the only note that you can really ...


1

Depending on exactly what chords you mean, this could be done many different ways, however my usual rule of thumb is when sliding from one chord to another is to try and slide either the root or he third or fifth (generally this means first or second finger) while moving the other fingers to the new shape during the slide. As I say, it depends on the chords ...


0

Your best bet is to take it to a luthier. They would be happy to have a look at it and quickly identify whether or not it's a good instrument, or if it will require a lot of expensive work, or if it has any irreparable structural defects (though everything in the photos looks good!). Anything that looks busted or worn out can generally be fixed, the tuners, ...


1

Instrument-making did not play a much renowned role in the USSR. So you could have instrument makers who disposed of their factory duties by working insane shifts for a week, then working on instruments for two weeks at a time privately. "Traditional" instruments like Balalaikas or Bayans might have had some degree of an official blessing: in that case, ...


4

I certainly wouldn't throw this away; if I didn't want to keep it as a curiosity piece, I would try to sell it. It may not be a great musical instrument, but it's suitable for a museum or a collector of Soviet memorabilia. I would expect to find: It is playable, but doesn't sound or feel great. Nobody would buy it for musical reasons Someone would want to ...


3

You are missing the tuners. I can not speak to the value of the guitar but it is not playable until at least that is replaced. It is unclear from the picture whether the tuners were friction or gear. I am betting on friction. If they were friction some slight adaption may be desired to fit modern gear tuners on the instrument. At the same time, if the ...


1

It's a hard question to answer, but I started to play guitar when I found an old spanish guitar which belonged to my father when he was young (more o less, a 20 year old guitar as well). At that time, it was not clear whether I would keep playing guitar or not, so I didn't buy another one until I decided myself to go on. If the wood is not eaten by woodworm ...


3

As Todd stated above he is correct in the use of pedals and amps, and the differences in acoustic amps and regular electric guitar amps. However, you can get away with it, it just may not have the sound you're looking for as Todd stated. But, you can use a Maxon OD 9 overdrive pedal, and it will have more bass response than the old Tube Screamer overdrive ...


5

It won't cause damage. The main consequence of using electric guitar effects with an acoustic amp is the sound will be different. An amp for an electric guitar actually changes the sound a lot, both the sound of the pedals and of the guitar. An acoustic amp is more meant to be like a mini PA that cleanly reproduces the sound. Distortion pedals might sound ...



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