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5

No, there is no other term that I know of. The term "crossover" seems to be the term everybody uses, but sometimes they add "nylon-string" to make sure that people know they are not talking about guitars with steel strings. I have written extensively about crossover guitars on my blog, circa 2009. My first blog entry is here: ...


0

There are two ways: Play it in one take. I won't get into your own abilities, or why you need to record sections separately, however for thousands of years musicians have played (and still play!) full, complete pieces without needing to stop and change. It happens more than you think in modern music styles, and some artists pride themselves on playing ...


2

I think this is a bit of a silly answer, but you could get a cheap/old acoustic guitar and rip the back off. This would kill all the acoustic resonance and you'd get hardly any noise. But as others have said, an electric guitar is a better option unless you need an acoustic for specific reasons (which you should add to your question). However, even an ...


3

There are a number of silent guitars on the market. These are quite similar in principle to electric violins - a solid non-resonant body and fitted with piezoelectric pickups at the bridge. In addition headphones and possibly an amplifier will be required for silent practice. Some are available as nylon-strung versions for classical-style guitar, as well ...


2

The point of an acoustic guitar is that it can be heard without need for any amplification. To have an instrument that cannot be heard by others, a solid guitar is a better option. That can then be connected to a small amp, etc., and headphones. What are the reasons you don't want to be heard? They may give other options.


1

It's a G6 chord: 3 x 2 4 3 x (from low E to high e, counted from the capo); due to the capo it sounds like an Ab6 chord. If you like you could just replace it by a standard G chord.


0

For most normal guitars, I have always been told not to do this. A normal electric or steel-strung acoustic guitar will have a truss rod in the neck, and if adjusted correctly this will handle the string tension just fine. For a truly traditional classical guitar with absolutely no neck reinforcement - I've never owned one. If it will be stored for six ...


0

One sticker on a Yamaha F335 will not have a perceptible effect on the sound of the guitar. If you covered the entire soundboard (top) with stickers, you might notice an impact on the resonance of your tone. Most of the sound from an acoustic guitar is produced by the vibration of the top - also known as the sound board. Anything that reduces or dampens ...


6

One sticker on the guitar body will by any reasonable metric make diddly squat difference to the sound being made. There's just no way such an imperceptible change in mass will affect the resonance, and it's not like a sticker is going to restrict vibration of the surface either. I mean hell, most acoustic guitars have big plastic pickguards on them, and ...


2

Yes. But it depends on what is your guitar, what's the wood, where you place it, how thick is the sticker. I'm assuming your Yamaha F335 is made of a plywood, then if you place your sticker on the back of your guitar, it'll be fine I guess. But if you place it on your fingerboard, it will affect the sound so much. But I know you'll place it somewhere on ...


0

This is an answer to an old question but new readers will come along with the same concerns I'm sure. A non-player will never be able to buy a good instrument except by luck. I've played expensive guitars that were rubbish and cheap ones that weren't. Comparison is really important. It allows you to factor out the acoustics of the shop. If the guitar has ...


3

I recently took up playing again after a gap of many years. My fingers remembered what to do but the pain was pretty excruciating. I just ignored it and eventually it went away. Little and often is the best way. Keep your guitar near you when watching TV and just pick it up during the adverts and play a few chords then put it down again. This gives your ...


1

I don't think it will affect the overall sound. Something like the freshness of your strings will have a much bigger impact.


-1

It varies with everyone, but you should see callouses/skin peeling off after a few weeks. Also, if you get blisters, DO NOT POP THEM! Give your fingers a rest, blisters will pop by themselves when it's time.


2

Callouses should only take a couple weeks to a month but will take longer to get to their full thickness. Strength will be something you build and maintain as long as you play. You'll also learn precise finger placement that will let you fret well with less strength. It may take a few years before strength is not a concern for you at all. Addendum: If you ...


0

It depends on what you're playing. Typically, I would suggest you get an acoustic guitar. It's simple, portable, and versatile. But, if you're onto rock or metal, I would suggest you to get an electric guitar. The acoustic guitar itself splits into nylon strings and steel strings. The nylon strings let you enjoy your style on jazz and classical. The ...


3

Before you start sanding your saddle down, it is important to be sure you have the truss rod adjusted optimally for your playing style. Excess relief in the truss rod will make the action higher, particularly from about the 4th fret to the fret closest to the sound hole. You might be able to attain a lower action by adjusting the truss rod to flatten out ...


0

10-15 mm seems well too high! With sandpaper, it'll take days/weeks! If it IS that much, then put some paper round it, trap it in a vice, and file it down, with strokes along its long edge, underneath. I hope you meant 1.0-1.5 mm!. Even so, the same approach will work, but bear in mind that once you go too far, the solution is to start again with another ...


3

Normally the bottom of the saddle would be sanded down to lower it. The challenge is sanding it down evenly and squarely. The technique I've seen for this is to fix or hold down the sandpaper on a flat surface and run the bottom of the saddle back and forth over it. You might consider buying an extra saddle or two and working on a spare so you can keep your ...


0

I don't think there is a any "technical" terms that is used for percussive fingerstyle as they usually end up being nothing more than descriptors of what the guitarist doing (from my knowledge). Case in point, this individual points out the following techniques: String Slap, Thump and thumb, Thump and nails, Nail Knocks, Drum and Strum, the Tap and Slap. ...


0

I play a 1mm+ ultex pick for all my playing, acoustic or electric, lead or rhythm. I've made my pick, so to speak. I found that I hated the flop of thin picks, because I was never sure where it was in relation to the string. It'd bend instead of picking, so I always used a Fender Medium or higher. I was told that ultex picks like Clayton Golds or the ...


2

"... lead players should play with thicker picks ..." I believe it doesn't help to think of such statements as rules. From my experience it's true that many players prefer thicker picks for playing solo lines than for strumming, but that's not necessarily the case for you. Just to give you an example, I use two different picks for playing acoustic guitar: ...


1

I can suggest two books to strengthen your theoretical grasp on music: The Everything Music Theory Book: A Complete Guide to Taking Your Understanding of Music to the Next Level by Marc Schonbrun and The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levin. I'd suggest you to pick up and study the first book thoroughly, and then only delve into the second one. Both of these are ...


6

The difference is that the nylon strings on the classical are all close to the same diameter, whereas on the steel string the diameter of the smallest string might be about 20% of the size of the diameter of the largest. This matters because the physics you have learned is simplified. Only string that have no thickness and no stiffness exactly fit the ...


4

You are incorrect in your assertion that there is a physical law being broken here. A guitar has six strings of different diameters, different materials (some strings are a plain length of steel wire, whereas others have other wires wrapped around the steel wire core) and tensile strengths, tuned to different pitches. As a result, there must be a compromise ...



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