New answers tagged

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My original style was electric blues, and this has changed over the years to jazz standards, and solo jazz guitar. For both styles I prefer heavy gauge strings, and for blues the bigger strings combined with higher action really helps the tone when bending the strings. You have the added advantage of building up strength in your hands and fingers, because a ...


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TL;DR The short answer (thanks, @RockinCowboy!) is that usually you want your action as low as possible, without hearing any fret-buzz, especially if you are just starting with guitar. Now the longer answer... There are advantages to both a higher and lower action on a guitar. In fact, it is often appropriate to have a higher or lower action depending upon ...


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I have the same guitar!(YAMAHA f310) and i had the same problem ! .. The original strings are meduim .. They are really hard to play as a beginner and may hurt your fingers . As i told you i had the same problem but i got rid of buzzing sound by changing strings to Extra Light and re settingup my guitar :) Good Luck .


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This the best app that an Awesome for tuning Strings in Guitar. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ovelin.guitartuna&hl=en Happy Playing...


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By changing to lighter strings you reduce the tension on the neck. The truss rod in your guitar is designed to counter the tension exerted by the strings. The strings bend it forward (in a concave arc like a smile). The truss rod bends the neck in the opposite direction - backwards (in a convex arc like a frown). Too much of a forward bend (smile) will ...


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Moving to lighter strings will have reduced the string tension, so this has two direct effects that could cause your buzz: if you have a tremolo (this guitar dues not, so ignore this section) it will have moved backwards, so on most floating tremolos this means your strings will be closer to the body of the guitar, which will result in buzzing. This is ...


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Extra light strings will tune to pitch under much lower tension and therefore have a wider oscillation envelop when they vibrate. For that reason it is often necessary to raise the action when switching to lighter strings - and one way to raise the action is to raise the saddle height by putting a shim under it (on acoustic guitar). However, it is not ...


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Of course you can play chords using fingers, pick or in fact anything. The majority of guitarists you will see on TV use a pick for chords. It looks like you are getting hung up on the difference between playing every note simultaneously (eg when you pluck 4 strings at once with your fingers) and playing them almost simultaneously by strumming down across ...


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You can play chords with a pick, and many players do, however what might be your ideal pick for soloing may not be appropriate for strumming because of it being too hard. You may want to try to find a pick that compromises between the two types of playing, hard enough to let you solo but flexible enough to let you play a strumming pattern. BTW you may want ...


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They're harmonics, but they don't HAVE to be from open strings, (these examples are), although they're the easiest to produce. Best sounding when plucked very close to the bridge. If a string is fretted, you can use the thumb at the node (any of them) and pluck the note, usually with your pick. They're called pinched harmonics, and are most often heard on ...


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This bright sound (it needn't be short) is called "harmonics", and it can be produced by putting a finger lightly on a nodal point of an open string- that is, some small fraction of the length (a half, a third, a quarter...) and plucking that string. This will result in a note an octave higher than the open string (if you touch the string halfway), an ...


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You may buy or prepare a string dampener (elasic hair or guitar version) .


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Dampen the strings below the frets you are tapping. Usually by using a finger on the fretting hand that's not doing anything else. Maybe this means re-positioning your fretting fingers, to free up the index.


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It is perfectly normal and it happens. I do not reccomend playing right after showering though, because the skin is soft and that part of the skin usually gets torn. I would reccomend waiting for say 30 minutes before playing.


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With today's amp modeler you don't really need a Guitar amp. Using a guitar amplifier will just color the tone from your amp modeler. PA is way better. If you are going to use an AMP modeler DON'T BUY a GUITAR AMP.


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Adding to Rockin's usual helpful answer, lighter strings, while being easier to press down, will also be more prone to rattle. So you'll have to be just as firm, but for a slightly different reason, although the outcome is the same. Also, in setting up, having substantially different strings will often necessitate changing the intonation - the open length of ...


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The buzzing might because the strings are tuned too low or the guitar is not properly set up (refer to Rockin Cowboy's answer). But it might also be because your fingers don't yet have enough strength to push the string hard enough into the fret. Light strings can help with that, since they have lower tension. However, as a beginner I was quite averse to ...


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The short answer is that lighter gauge strings will be easier to play and easier to get clear tone when you fret the notes. Most beginners and even many seasoned guitarist prefer lighter gauge strings. But going from medium gauge to extra light gauge will probably create the need for a new set up. So let's talk a little about "set up" for acoustic ...


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I was worried about this same problem. i had a small 10 watt Marshall Mg that I played with a les paul. It was good for quiet practice in my basement but i wanted bigger sound. However i didn't have big money to go spend on a tube amp or anything. What i did have was a Fender Acoustasonic 30watt amp. Even with an electric guitar plugged in it have a great ...


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The answer is that nickel wound strings (found on electric sets and John Pearse Nickle Wound Acoustic sets) of a given gauge (diameter) will have less overall mass than an equivalent gauge "Phosphor Bronze" or "80/20 Bronze" and therefore tune to a given pitch at slightly lower tension (assuming equal scale length). See comparison chart at end of this ...


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The scale length will be a factor; for a given gauge, the longer the string, the more tension will be required to tune it to the same pitch. The difference between strings of the same gauge will be due to their weight or mass per unit length. This gauge comparison is only valid for like strings -- that is, wound vs. wound, or unwound vs. unwound. A wound ...


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Ever considered Martin Monel acoustic strings? They are nickel plated strings for acoustics and give you a different feel and more flexible response...


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As near as dammit. The difference will be the third (G) string. Generally on an electric set it's plain, but wound on an acoustic set. You probably wouldn't want the plain on an acoustic, although that's what my acoustics usually have - full electric sets. Slightly thinner, but that means less tension.


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And... And string "action" - higher action is louder. And the angle at which the string attaches to the body (as in Millenial style guitars) - a greater angle is louder. And the place at which you pluck the strings - this varies (by guitar and by individual string) but the string is usually louder near the double-octave harmonic next to the sound hole. And ...


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I have been playing through not only a p/a speaker, but using a full stereo p/a amplifier. This is because I have been fully converted to Modelling technologies. Up until recently I was using a VOX Tonelab LE, and it finally took a crap so I picked up an HD500. I have better sound than anybody on an standard amp, and it's versatile as hell. I can go clean ...


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Excellent explanation by Rockin Cowboy. On a purely pratical side I would add that volume is a sound property that can be easily measured, at least on relative terms. A number of free APPs for mobile phones are available that measure the sourrounding sound intensity. These are not professional tools, of course, but provide a good enough comparison of ...


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Wow. If you are actually going to make a guitar then I must say that is quite challenging. I have a friend who is a woodworker who tried to make several guitars - but they just did not work out so well. Here is what I can share about volume as it relates to guitars. Let's start with an acoustic guitar (no electronics to amplify the sound). An ...


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I think it's fake, the label is worrying, clumsily printed & doesn't match the shape of the printed oval to the shape of the actual sticker. A picture of the headstock from the OP would help to check the logo & font used more closely, fakes tend to get the M wrong. Note the centre of the M shouldn't reach the baseline. Just to provide some ...


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Yamaha seems to have only sold FG 720 S models. I can't find any FG 720 C models, even in their list of discontinued models. On the basis of this, I would argue it's a fake.



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