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0

my guitar fg 201-b havnt trust rodd,, theres a high action in higher fretchs feeling difficult to playy


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I am/was in the same position. I felt like I was groping in the dark and needed help, not least to not learn bad habits at the beginning. I couldn't afford an hour a week tutor so I found one who does half an hour for half the price. It really helps as you get pointers, structure and motivation (you have to come back next week and show him you practiced what ...


1

Practice, practice, practice. What you are experiencing is 100% natural. Every guitarist out there had this problem at first. It's very common for guitar methods to give you the C chord as your first one. This chord is very hard for beginners. Keep practicing, and play chords that you find are easier (like D, E, and Am). You'll get it, just be ...


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If you are really struggling, make your first 3 chords E A and B7. They all work together, and with them, you will be able to accompany literally hundreds of songs. E and A are quite easy to play separately, and the change from one to the other is simple. If you leave your index finger on 3rd string 1st fret, it can stay there for both chords. It acts as an ...


3

First of all I want to say congratulations on your decision to learn guitar. As you have already discovered, it is not an easy instrument to master - but once things begin to come together and you start learning to change from chord to chord and play songs, it is very rewarding. And since there is always room for improvement no matter how good you become, ...


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Tune your guitar to pitch, then check the tuning at the first fret. Does the e string give you an F or is it F sharped? If so, your nut slots aren't deep enough. This problem is somewhat common on gibsons. The open chords sound horrible, but Barre chords sound better as you go up the neck. Hope that's all it is, good luck!


3

You can remove half of the strings and convert your twelve string into a six string with very wide string spacing. But I will tell you a few reasons why you might not want to. But first, here is what you should know if you do. Be aware that you will reduce the overall tension to some degree with fewer strings. You will probably notice that the relief in ...


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If you remove one of each pair of string, two things may happen: The action will almost certainly get lower, which will make the guitar easier to play but may cause fret buzzing. The intonation may be off on the higher frets. To test the intonation, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and compare it with the fretted note. The two should be the same. ...


1

It sounds like a pretty strange solution to the problem. Sourcing a 6-string guitar with a suitably wide neck would be far better, surely - and either keep the 12-str or sell/trade it?


8

I think it would be better not to do that. Your guitar's neck is built to have the tension of twelve strings. By removing half of the strings, you'll be taking out about half of the tension that needs to be there to keep the neck straight. This could even go as far as changing the neck's shape in an unwanted way. A luthier probably wouldn't be able to ...


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Even as an experienced guitar player I still personally prefer light gauge steel strings and often use coated strings because they are less noisy when I slide from fret to fret on a string. But everyone has their own personal preference and you will develop your own preference over time. One thing you will notice as you experiment with different strings on ...


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You might also consider using cheap hide glue for this project, namely supermarket unflavored gelatin. Frets.com has instructions for using it. You can buy a box for about $1 that will give you three packets and you'll use, at most, half a packet for this job. The hard part w/ hide glue is keeping it warm while applying it--do your work in the warmest ...


1

I do understand your dilemma. I had a similar situation and continued to play the guitar while thinking about how to reinforce the bridge (used silk and steel strings and tuned it a step flat). Before I got around to taking action to prevent it, the bridge completely detached. Obviously the best way to correct your problem is to remove the bridge and ...


4

My name is Bruce Rubin of Rubinsguitars.com The soundboard grading system is based on cosmetic appearance and closeness of the grain. When a well-crafted soundboard is produced by a skilled maker, He will balance that specific top to resonate based on the characteristics of that specific piece of wood. My experience has shown me cosmetic appearance has ...


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Some short wood screws work if you want a cheap" NOW" fix. I wouldn't suggest it for expense guitars but, without removing string and the bridge it's reliable. Two screws on the left and right sides of the bridge,in the" tapered wings" that extend out words. Pre drilling pilot holes slightly smaller than your screws will keep from splitting issues.



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