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-1

Let try some Boucher guitar, There are known for sounding like pre-war martin. The company also make Adirondack top for high end Martin and taylor.


3

If both guitars buzz with light strings but not with heavier strings, then there are a couple of options. I'm assuming the buzz is happening when the string touches a fret somewhere near the middle of its vibrating length; if the buzz is at the nut or bridge or somewhere else, then this line of thinking does not apply. You could switch to a heavier gauge, ...


0

Another "trick" you can do is tune down the guitar (I recommend 1 or 1/2 tone, more may require neck adjustments) and use, if you want, a capo; the strings will have less tension and will be easier to bend. You can also experiment alternative tunings, which are usually softer than standard. However, difficult bendings are only a matter of exercise, keep on ...


1

Since it hasn't been mentioned (my apologies if I missed it), I'd like to point out that you can be very effective bending only a 1/2 musical step. Wider bends (like a whole step bend) are also easier near the middle of the string span, rather than down where you are playing open chords. So look for places within the scales of the chords you are playing ...


0

If you're using metal (steel) strings, acoustic strings are generally thicker than electric guitar strings. For that reason, string bending is more common with electric guitarists. The gauge of the string makes a difference in that lighter strings are physically easier to bend (less metal to move about) and are more responsive in that you don't have to bend ...


0

I would change string gauges and see what you think. If sou do decide to do this I would recommend a slight tightening on the truss rod.


3

Bending strings on a steel stringed acoustic guitar can be done to good effect. It works on a nylon stringed too, but is less common. You can try a lighter string gauge to make it easier. Especially steel stringed guitars are usually stringed with pretty brutal gauges. All major string manufacturers have lighter gauge acoustic strings. For nylon stringed ...


0

I agree with Tim's advice (above), but also try bending your wrist (i.e., move your hand) closer to your body and shift your elbow (possibly more outwards) so that there is less tension in your last finger. Also, just continue to practice. You may develop some callus but you will get better with time (and such discomfort will disappear).


3

I used to have the same problem on violin: my pinky started trembling violently when I tried holding a string down with it for more than a few seconds. Here are a few exercises I’ve used to increase the strength in my third and fourth fingers to the point where I have few issues playing music with them. First is an exercise I learned after spraining my ...


3

There is no need to leave the other three fingers in place on the frets, pressing down the strings, while you press the fourth fret note down. Mostly, you need to only press the note you're playing, certainly as a newbie. Later, when playing legato, and using pull-offs, you will probably need two fingers pressing simultaneously, but for now, release maybe ...


0

If you enlarge your hole in the guitar, it provides a higher, louder sound. If you want a lower, richer sound, get a guitar that has a smaller soundhole. I hope this helps ;)


0

I always used to use the Taylor way and go for the three loops but I recently read this article suggesting to use as little string as possible as this helps with tuning issues and I have preferred this method to be honest. You can have a look here. It might just come down to personal preference and I haven't met a tech yet who has told be there is clear ...


1

I got to be honest, learning barre chords could be tough, especially F. So try playing like that for a while. Even after learning to play F barre (or others) for a while you're facing issues, then you should get your action reduced. You will have calluses in the initial learning phase because the fingertip has sensitive/soft flesh. Even after you've learned ...


2

Simple answer - yes. A number of ways to go. Take it back and complain. Pay lots for a set up. Tune down, maybe a tone or semitone. Put some lighter gauge strings on the guitar. If the guitar cost a hundred pounds sterling or more, it should be quite playable out of the box. A cheaper one usually reflects its price in its playability. There may be several ...


1

Looking at the edges of the soundhole is the best method; in addition, you can look at the grain of the soundboard: cheap laminates usually aren't made to be good looking, often they use lower quality woods, if you see nice spruce patterns it's probably solid; also, the bracing on a solid top is different, but that has to be judged by a luthier. Anyway, the ...



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