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3

Because the strings on a steel-string are closer, you will have to curl (claw) your left hand fingers more to place them accurately. In the long run I found this aids playing (classical) on a nylon string guitar where you are exhorted to curl your left hand fingers. So, playing on a steel-string now and then helps to develop this practice.


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D'addarrio custom lights are amazing strings, but as my childhood teacher used to say... your sound will only be as good as your weakest link. it must all be meant for each other. IMHO, dreadnoughts and the kind of feel your looking for are not meant for each other. This is how we learn though, we go for it and if it doesn't work it doesn't work. The other ...


3

This is almost entirely down to tradition - early guitars used similar construction to equivalent instruments - lutes, violins etc all had that slot mechanism for the tuning pegs, where you have a slightly tapered tuning peg that is pushed into the hole to tighten. Obviously, with more recent technology, tuning pegs with worm gear mechanism have removed the ...


0

I play the violin everyday for about 1.5 hours, and I have got slight dimples on my fingertips too. Like the guitar, I have to press down on metal strings and I have calluses. I don't think its something to be concerned with though.


0

You mentioned that you are just in the beginning stages of grasping music theory and that's perfectly alright. We have all been there. I think you might be confusing major intervals with major and minor chords that go with a given key. It is true that the note A natural is the 6th scale degree of the C major scale (key of C). It is also true that A ...


1

In addition to the other answers, you need to look at your ergonomics, which will not only improve speed but prevent injury. Musicians are small-muscle athletes and get injured without proper technique and warmup. Press a chord voicing on your guitar with your fingers as close behind the frets as possible. Playing one string at a time, lighten your finger ...


1

When you are on a certain chord for a bar, then, yes, it'll work. I presume a bar of C, using C scale notes, then a bar of E (dominant of A), where you could use E scale notes, leading to a bar of A, where A scale notes will work. What you need to bear in mind is that all these keys have some common notes, but they may not be chord notes. For example,all 3 ...


1

Well, it's going to be quite dissonant, because there are going to be a lot of notes clashing. The A major scale has C# and G# whereas the chord C has C and G natural.* So, those notes are going to create a dissonance. It will sound smoothly over the E and A chords, because E is the V of A, so the notes are the same. Keep in mind that the chord progression ...


1

Welcome to the wonderful world of learning to play guitar. I think one of the must frustrating things for new aspiring guitarist in the beginning stages is learning to play chords. The strange and unusual shapes that your brain must get your fingers to contort into are unnatural and often very difficult in the beginning. Everyday life does not require ...


8

Hammer-ons. Rather than putting your fingers on the appropriate strings/frets one at a time, try to get them down as a hammer-on. After all, this is how, hopefully, you will end up forming them when you are playing. All fingers need to land together and firmly.You sort of make the chord shape before you smartly land them on the strings. Of course it'll take ...


0

You can try getting flat wound strings, which are much smoother than round wound strings. You should also try different gauges of string to see if you find one easier to play than another. Light gauge strings can be easier on your fingers since you don't have to press as hard.


3

You can approximate electric guitar sustain by playing a fiddle bow on the unwound strings. You need to apply resin to the fiddle bow to get it to sound and you need to clean the resin off of your guitar after you play or it may affect the finish. You can also approximate some electric guitar like sounds by playing with a slide or bottleneck on the unwound ...


1

Try weaving strips of aluminium foil or paper through the strings. Another way would be to manipulate the bridge to make the guitar sound buzzy like a sitar or tamboura, see here for inspiration. I've also been able to get a compressed and almost overdriven tone from an acoustic by playing really hard.


1

I highly doubt that you can ever get a sound that was close to indistinguishable from an overdriven electric guitar. For playing power chords, I find that a nylon strung guitar struck hard gives a closer sound to an electric than an acoustic. If you are recording it, then instead of trying to make the guitar distort, you could aim to make the microphone ...


0

The thought that comes to mind is to record the acoustic guitar using basically any music recording software (like Cubase) and add distortion (or whatever effect) in the actual program.


1

I have played a few guitars with an additional side mounted sound hole. Although not scientific in the least, I found that a small to medium elliptical opening (about three inches long and about two inches wide) located on the apex of the upper bout or between the apex of the upper bout and the waist sounded best. Unfortunately, this placement often ...



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