New answers tagged

0

I did it for you, since I was curious: Low A: .034 wound D: .028 wound G: .020 wound C: .017 plain E: .011 plain High A: .008 plain Total tension is almost exactly the same. Individual tensions are pretty close. One main difference between electric and acoustic strings that may come into play is that on electric guitars, the 3rd string is usually plain, ...


0

Without seeing the guitar it'd be hard to tell. It would cost quite a bit to fix the issues you mentioned. I think the best thing would be to take it to an expert and see if it's worth anything. Keep in mind that it could be simply a 40$ guitar. Another thing to consider is its sound. Do you like it? If you do, you should repair it and keep it.


1

Of course it's feedback: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_feedback In this case, the transducer is the in the role of the microphone. Every different setup has a different potential for feedback. You could get feedback with your magnetic sound hole pickup, it's just not as easy. If your acoustic has a battery inside it, then you have an active system, ...


0

That's an extremely unconventional way of playing a chord that I could never recommend to a beginner who is struggling with changes.


7

There are a lot of good answers here but I didn't see what I was primarily looking for in them, so I will add it. In addition to patience and practice, there is a technique for making the chord change more smoothly. When stumming, we usually have to nail the chord change completely in the very small amount of time between the last strum of the old chord ...


4

Simple answer: Two weeks is not enough to be effective at fingerpicking for the first time. Have patience. Practice consistently, every day. Take breaks during your practice to let your fingers forget (within the same practice session), and then relearn the pattern for a more concentrated effort. Your memory is key. Memorize, and practice for memory's sake. ...


5

You need to reduce your cognitive load. The other answers have some good ideas, but here is another quick one: Simplify the picking pattern you are practicing with. So instead of practicing an arpeggiated pattern, just pluck the bass with your thumb, then three treble strings at once with three fingers held together. That's it. PLUCK-twang, PLUCK-twang, ...


2

You're trying to do two different things at the same time. Neither of which is easy by itself, after only 6 mths playing. So, instead of using C and G, which are each using a different hand (and arm) position, try E and A, where you can leave your index finger on 3rd string, 1st fret for both. You won't need to look at that l.h. now. So you can concentrate ...


6

This sounds to me like you do not have the picking technique down yet. This makes you focus on the right hand which leads to you struggling with the left hand chord changes. My advice for you would be to maybe first forget about chords and just play open strings. Make sure you have got the finger picking down to the extent where you can look at your left ...


7

Okay so if I understand you correctly you are not having any trouble with chord changes when using a pick (presumably to strum) but if you are playing fingerstyle one string at a time with a pattern or using a pick to pick out individual notes of a chord (in a pattern) - then your transitions between chords simply fall apart. If that is what is happening ...


2

I can understand what you are experiencing because I used to have the exact same problem. It took some time to overcome the issue and I tried several things before discovering what works really well for me. While there is no doubt that an ultra thin pick will make it impossible to play as loudly as you can with a thicker pick, the feel of a thin pick is ...


2

I would say your thoughts are mostly right. Playing with a thinner pick will produce a quieter sound, but there is a trade off where you may not get the tone you want. So this is not always an option and will only get you so far. The best point is about your grip, and you are spot on. Playing with a looser grip will make you quieter. There is a trade off ...


3

Every string on every guitar will deviate at the nut. Downwards. There needs to be an angle, be it laterally or downwards, so that the string has a 'node', rather like if the string is fretted, there is a downwards angle formed by the fretting finger, otherwise the note doesn't ring clearly. The nut isn't there to clamp the string tightly, although some of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included