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2

I'm a flamenco guitar player, so I naturally suggest you try listening to something played by Paco de Lucia, Tomatito or Sabicas and see if it grabs you by the hottanannys as it did me 40 years ago :-)


2

Just about any type of music can be played using finger picking arrangements or arpeggio or individual note picking with a plectrum or a combination. Country, folk, bluegrass, rock, blues, all can be played in a manner and style that will allow you to utilize the skills you learned playing classical.


0

I've been playing for about 15 years, and I only use nylon strings on my Ibanez V-310 acoustic. I used Dean Markley high tension ball end nylon strings. You might have to adjust the truss rod until you get the tension and sound you want. Be very careful! Adjust it a small amount at a time! And you'll probably have to file your nut slots or buy a new nut to ...


1

Guitars designed for steel strings are made completely different from guitar's designed for nylon strings. Putting steel strings on a guitar made for nylon strings could ruin the guitar. Putting nylon strings on a guitar made for steel strings is not a good idea either. A picture of the guitar might help me determine which type of guitar you have. But ...


3

Hold on here. If this particular make and model of guitar was indeed originally designed for steel strings, but your friend put nylon strings on it, then it would indeed be okay to put steel strings on it instead. However, we need more information. What is the exact make and model of the guitar? What modifications have been made to the guitar to accommodate ...


-3

NO! Steel string guitars are specifically designed to be able to handle the higher tensions that is part and parcel of wound steel strings. Nylon string guitar are simply not design to handle that amount of strain on the bridge and using steel strings on them will likely leave long lasting warpage to the bridge. USE THE STRINGS THE GUITAR WAS DESIGNED ...


0

Your friend has heard something about old-fashioned longbows which must be unstrung after use. A yew bow will deform if it is left for a long time under full tension. Thus it becomes less useful as a bow. When it comes to guitars, they are designed to be under tension. In fact (depending on the type of instrument) the neck may form a reverse curve when the ...


0

The first question is what type of guitar you have! If it's a classical guitar (Spanish style), then it's nylon strings all the way. Never, under any circumstances, put anything other than nylon strings on a classical guitar. It can't handle the tension, and you'll destroy it. Otherwise, just get very light strings. String sets are described by the ...


0

Have you changed strings in those 3-4 months? If not, the simple answer is that your strings are dead. Average working life for guitar strings is maybe 2 months if you're not playing hard. The most common reason for strings to break is that they're old and fatigued. Don't ever, ever, ever, change a single string in isolation and leave all the old crappy ...


0

You say "sounds fine". Do you have a digital tuner? If not, download a guitar tuner app on your phone. If you're relatively new to the guitar, my first bet would be that you don't have good enough ears yet to tune by ear. Keep working on it, you'll get there - but in the meantime, a digital tuner will see you right. My next bet would be that you haven't ...


5

Leave it tuned, not only will the strings thank you for allowing them to 'settle in' to their proper tension (think of repeatedly bending a coat-hanger to break it) but the machine head gears will also not suffer as much slippage in the long run. The wood and glue is also better off staying under tension. The only time where all the strings should be ...


15

Imagine what chaos there would be in a guitar shop close to closing time every day! And even worse at opening time! Just smile sweetly at your friend, and let him carry on wrecking his guitar and wasting his time, but realise that actually you know far better and leave your guitar in tune for the next day. I've done it with about 20+ guitars for 50+ years, ...


1

Yes you can. Actually periodically (day by day) tune and detune the guitar hundred times a year and thousand times by its lifecycle may harm your neck way with much greater possibility than leaving it alone. Tuning and detuning is always a kind of stress for the neck you do not want to do this unnecessary thousand times.


22

I leave all ten of my acoustic guitars tuned all the time. In most cases it is not a problem to leave your guitar under the full tension of standard tuning for days or even weeks at a time. However, if you know you will be storing a guitar for an extended period of time (months) without playing it or changing the strings, it is probably a good idea to ...


3

Yes you can leave your guitar tuned over night and it is what most if not all guitarist do. The neck of your guitar should be able to take being in tune for a period of time and the tension put on it and if not, there are more serious issues with your guitar.


0

I have found that using 10- 47 sets lights and tthen detuning to D instead E sounds good and reduces the string tension on the neck. Just my .02 works for me. Also ifyo ur guitar is strong you can try the medium top and heavy bottom 1/2. It does increase the bass if you are looking for more bass especially in a mahogany back/sides guitar. This is what I ...


0

These are acoustic guitars in the tracks but you could probably get a similar sound (since you will be adding effects and processing) using an acoustic simulator with a electric guitar like the Boss AC-3. Having an acoustic simulator with a electric guitar with single coil pickups can create a nice sound. It's not exactly the same as an acoustic guitar but ...


-1

it's the guitar not you i can tell by the shape of that guitar. i have the same probleme when i hear another guitar's sound i feel that what i have is not a guitar. you don't need to be a pro player in order to tell the difference just play the same chord( for example A major ) in both guitar and you will hear the difference.


2

I change my tuning all the time, including using DADGBE as you do and have had the same guitar for a decade, with no problems as a result. Especially since you are just slightly changing the tuning of the low E string, which is your strongest, I doubt it will even have an impact on the strength of the string. It is NEVER my first to pop!


3

Since you're only loosening one string, and for a short while, no harm in that. The other strings may change their tuning slightly in the process, but that's o.k. Those DGs are good guitars, but consider keeping it, and having two when you upgrade - one standard, one D-tuned. Yes, on electrics, it's the same, except those vibrato-equipped will probably have ...


3

This will not hurt the guitar, especially since you're only adjusting one string. Even with more general tuning changes, e.g. changes to open D, you won't hurt the guitar; the worst side-effect might be sub-optimal neck relief. Re-tuning will tend to wear the strings more; causing them to break more easily, but I've noticed this more on the thinner ...


8

You will have a very small amount of extra wear and tear on that machine head and the groove in the nut that string passes through, but aside from that this should cause no damage to an acoustic or electric guitar. The change in tension on the neck from that one shift is not significant, in fact you can get a greater change from atmospheric conditions. So ...


3

You shouldn't have to either hammer on or pull off. This pattern can be played with thumb=>6th string, index=>4th, middle=>3rd, ring=>2nd, and using these fingers to pluck the notes that occur on those strings. Using p,i,m,a for thumb, index, middle and ring fingers respectively the plucking would go something like: | <p&m> i p m i ...


0

Adding to Neil's idea - count ONE234 TWO234 THREE234 FOUR234- making 16 divisions in a bar. First two notes in bar one are on ONE and TWO. Next two are on THREE and the 4 of THREE. Last note is on FOUR. No need for hammers or pulls. Obviously, you'll hold the two notes on the 2nd fret through both bars. I'm trying to figure the key, and where in the song ...


2

Count in the smallest note value to get a good idea of the rhythm. Make semi quavers one beat. Crotchets 4 beats and dotted quavers 3 beats and regular quavers two beats.


1

A friend o' mine did the double barre in a song many years ago and I was like, "Whoa, what's that?" He showed me and I went home and practiced it until my fingers ached, then practiced more. It's great to have that major chord at such a quick flick from the majors above it G to C, A to D, etc.. Nice for speed songs like punk rock too. Attack it and ...


0

Lots of misperception here! Besides changes in humidity, using different gauge strings is the next-largest single contributor to action changes/problems, as is tuning the entire guitar up or down a whole step or more. Using alternate open tunings will typically have very tiny, mostly-irrelevant affects on the playing action. The purpose of the truss rod ...


0

A little confusion here! .012" set of strings isn't 'fairly light' - it's about standard. The truss rod doesn't get adjusted in 'steps'. If they meant half a turn it's still meaningless. The truss rod adjustment is only part of sorting out the action. The bridge height is just as relevant. As is the effect of heavy strings. They won't change the action, once ...



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