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11

Noise cancellation never works on scales larger than the sound's wavelength, so it's only useful for headphones. Modifying the hall physically is the only real solution to this problem. Short of that, the first thing to try is indeed to bring the sound as directly to the audience as possible, by using a suitable PA arrangement. Big, single speakers located ...


10

Yes, but this phenomenon is easily explained by classical physics. If you hold down the sustain pedal on a piano (thus releasing the strings to vibrate freely), any instrument nearby playing a tone that is matched by one of the piano strings will cause that string to vibrate in sympathy. The tone provided by the voice, trombone, second piano, violin, etc. ...


9

Yup, probably. A few reasons I say this: In my experience, the biggest strength of Yamaha musical instruments is consistency -- to see something that looks handwritten is a pretty big red flag. You haven't mentioned a serial number at all. I assume that if there was one, you would include it. One aspect of that consistency is that every single genuine ...


9

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


7

When you pluck a guitar string you are always generating all of the harmonics to varying degrees. For your E2 N: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Note: E2 E3 B3 E4 G#4 B4 (D4) E5 D5 G#5 (n/a) B5 ... N; ratio of harmonic's frequency to the fundamental frequency 7th harmonic is pretty badly tuned in equal ...


6

Although some people would disagree to it's very existence, beaming is something you aren't really going to be able to properly tame. It's the nature a speaker cone to "beam" and people sell some nifty little gadgets that are supposed to fix the problem. Those gadgets may help you out a little bit, and as a matter of fact my friends old Matchless DC-30 has a ...


6

The Musica Universalis stretches the idea of music, in the same way that describing courtship as a "dance" stretches the idea of dance. As such, your hope to find melody in there is optimistic at best. Middle C - C4 - is 261.62 Hz; that is 261.62 vibrations per second. C-1 is 8.17 Hz, which you get by halving the frequency 5 times. It's inaudible, but it ...


6

The issue with a lot of ear protection is that it doesn't attenuate frequency evenly across the board. In particular, it will tend to reduce treble and mids more than bass, leaving you with a rather muffled sound. There are a number of ear plugs that seek to address this and provide even volume attenuation across the spectrum. For $10-12 Etymotics sell ...


5

Well, I can't give you any two dimensional Fourier Analysis here but if I put my practical engineer hat on I can give a rough idea. A drum itself is a passive device in other words you can't extract energy from it without giving more into it. Therefore, as Dr.Mayhem's comment hints the harder you hit, the more energy you put into. Now the moment you hit ...


5

I know that sometimes for concerts there will be "shells" around the ensemble, curving down and around the group. This will help reduce any noise escaping backwards. Not knowing the venue, this may not be part of the problem. It also depends on whether or not the ensemble is acoustic or electric. With electric you could point the speakers in different ...


5

Resonant Frequency Good guitars have the wooden top and body of the guitar carefully carved to resonate at a certain single frequency. While the luthier is carving and bracing the top of the guitar, long before the guitar is assembled and the strings are put on, he repeatedly taps the top with a knuckle, as if it were a drum, and listens to the fundamental ...


5

Each red line represents a loudness level (measured in phons). That is, for a given red line, every point on that line is perceived as equally loud. This is a way of representing a 3d graph on a 2d medium. The x and y axes are sound frequency and sound pressure level (decibels), respectively. The z axis is a subjective measure, "Loudness". Now, we have ...


5

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


5

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


5

Saxophones and oboes are conical, and behave like closed conical pipes. They are closed at the reed, just like the clarinet. Flutes are cylindrical, and behave like open cylindrical pipes. The sound is made by blowing across the opening at the head joint, and it is not closed like in other woodwinds. Clarinets are cylindrical like the flute, but closed ...


4

Having the piano with the back against the wall will slightly boost the treble frequencies, but not much. Loudness is the main factor. The piano will be quieter with the back directly against the wall because you're closing off the sound board which is on the back. Leaving a few inches of space between the piano and wall will significantly increase the ...


3

"I see another answer explains that the positioning is to "hear yourself better", but this will be hardly the case for bass amps, since those wavelengths are not very directional. Bass amp isolation from the floor will make little to no difference; low frequencies, the ones produced by the bass, are omnidirectional (unless a special system is used, which is ...


2

Could you provide us with the wave sample that you analyzed, so as we hear it ? Also could you zoom the spectrum window from 150Hz to 330Hz... because at this zoom level, the curve is obviously not accurate at all, then provide us the image at this level ( from E3 to E4). Maybe have you simply played a EM or Em chord wich contains a strong B at the fifth ...


2

If you can't treat the room, you can try optimizing using the sound system and the band. Control sound radiation so it beams as much as possible towards the audience and absorptive surfaces and away from any reflective surfaces. Monitor wedges are the worst. They beam up and back directly at backwall and ceiling. Wedges have their place on large stages but ...


2

A nice little demo of this is one I use with pupils: rest a piece of folded paper, about a quarter of a postage stamp size, on, say, the top string of a guitar. The middle of the string on an acoustic is good. Play notes on another guitar (or other instrument) and see what happens when that same top E is played. It also works, but not so markedly, with ...


1

If you have two vibrating strings you can produce a consonant musical interval between them if their vibrating lengths form certain integer ratios, like 3:2. It's appealing to scale this idea up to solar system size - to assume that 'consonant' systems like the planets also exhibit integer ratios in their properties. It's actually wrong though - planetary ...


1

Well the simple answer is yes, and various groups have taken different stabs at it. Some have been based on the relative wavelengths of the orbits - and one was on actual vibrations from shock waves in interstellar gases. Whether or not they will be musical is another thing entirely... I will try and find some more links Update: It looks like NASA's ...


1

Considering the size a combination of width and length, I'd say width one gives you the key (bass drum is wider, for example), while length, or depth we could say, gives you the amount of air in which the sound wave can bounce, amplifying the sound and giving it sustain and loudness. Materials too take their part in this, because they make the wave bounce ...


1

I'll admit I'm not entirely sure what you are asking, but I'll take a shot at it anyway. First, 1320 Hz is roughly an E. I can find that by assuming that 880 Hz is A and noting that the ratio of 1320Hz to 880 Hz is 3:2, which is the just interval of a perfect fifth. Every tone does have a frequency double the same tone an octave below, since that's what ...


1

Another thing you can use is a high quality digital delay for the high frequencies through the stage mains since they travel faster then the bass frequencies. Things will sound less muddled. You can also use a 3rd and 4th speaker in the back of the room with the live mix delayed on the stage mains and the rear or mid-room speakers non-delayed. Van Halen ...


1

You don't have to modify the room to add physical damping to it. Velvet drapes absorb a lot of sound, even when they don't actually cover any surface, and would be very sympathetic to the decor. A few loose rugs covering unused floor areas, where the audience isn't directly looking at them, would also help a lot. The drapes and rugs could be put in place ...


1

You are looking at the Fletcher-Munson equal loudness curves. The point, which no other answers have explained yet, is that this is a graph of how the human ear responds to sounds and loudness. The human ear and brain do not perceive a linear increase in sound pressure levels in a linear fashion, and the human ear and brain's perception of the volume of a ...


1

This question made me think of The 12-Volt. It was the first thing that came to mind, and I personally hope someone could find some opensource-recourse/resource. Is this the right direction, -Thanks


1

I've used the Etymotics and I recommend them for attending concerts or playing gigs. They're not too bad, and reasonably comfortable - but - do they provide enough protection when being exposed to very loud instruments quite regularly? I don't think they do. I've stopped wearing them at our regular band practices and now wear normal ear plugs rated at SNR ...



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