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17

Because of dynamics called room modes. Room modes are the collection of resonances that exist in a room when the room is excited by an acoustic source such as a loudspeaker. (...) each frequency being related to one or more of the room's dimension's or a divisor thereof. To keep things simple, we will assume the room has 6 parallel walls (right prism ...


15

It's because of the pseudo-compression that using distortion effect gives. The same will be true if you use a clean channel with a compressor, or if your amp has a natural compressing effect, as many do. What's happening is... You play a chord normally: You get quite nice mid-range strum of the strings, nothing surprising there. You play a palm muted ...


12

Noise cancellation never works on scales larger than the sound's wavelength, so it's only useful for headphones. Modifying the hall physically is the only real solution to this problem. Short of that, the first thing to try is indeed to bring the sound as directly to the audience as possible, by using a suitable PA arrangement. Big, single speakers located ...


10

Yes, but this phenomenon is easily explained by classical physics. If you hold down the sustain pedal on a piano (thus releasing the strings to vibrate freely), any instrument nearby playing a tone that is matched by one of the piano strings will cause that string to vibrate in sympathy. The tone provided by the voice, trombone, second piano, violin, etc. ...


10

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


10

JCPedroza's answer is correct for a square room, but I think it's worth pointing out that the shape of the room is not just it's dimensions. For example, a square room with an open window will act different than if the window is shut. In acoustics, we often model the response of a room as a circuit. If you break up the space into pieces, each piece can be ...


8

Top end refers to the treble tones on your guitar and bottom end refers to the bass tones; these are also referred to as 'highs' and 'lows'; and can be adjusted using the EQ on your amp.


7

When you pluck a guitar string you are always generating all of the harmonics to varying degrees. For your E2 N: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Note: E2 E3 B3 E4 G#4 B4 (D4) E5 D5 G#5 (n/a) B5 ... N; ratio of harmonic's frequency to the fundamental frequency 7th harmonic is pretty badly tuned in equal ...


6

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


6

The Musica Universalis stretches the idea of music, in the same way that describing courtship as a "dance" stretches the idea of dance. As such, your hope to find melody in there is optimistic at best. Middle C - C4 - is 261.62 Hz; that is 261.62 vibrations per second. C-1 is 8.17 Hz, which you get by halving the frequency 5 times. It's inaudible, but it ...


6

The issue with a lot of ear protection is that it doesn't attenuate frequency evenly across the board. In particular, it will tend to reduce treble and mids more than bass, leaving you with a rather muffled sound. There are a number of ear plugs that seek to address this and provide even volume attenuation across the spectrum. For $10-12 Etymotics sell ...


6

Although some people would disagree to it's very existence, beaming is something you aren't really going to be able to properly tame. It's the nature a speaker cone to "beam" and people sell some nifty little gadgets that are supposed to fix the problem. Those gadgets may help you out a little bit, and as a matter of fact my friends old Matchless DC-30 has a ...


6

Saxophones and oboes are conical, and behave like closed conical pipes. They are closed at the reed, just like the clarinet. Flutes are cylindrical, and behave like open cylindrical pipes. The sound is made by blowing across the opening at the head joint, and it is not closed like in other woodwinds. Clarinets are cylindrical like the flute, but closed ...


5

Each red line represents a loudness level (measured in phons). That is, for a given red line, every point on that line is perceived as equally loud. This is a way of representing a 3d graph on a 2d medium. The x and y axes are sound frequency and sound pressure level (decibels), respectively. The z axis is a subjective measure, "Loudness". Now, we have ...


5

I know that sometimes for concerts there will be "shells" around the ensemble, curving down and around the group. This will help reduce any noise escaping backwards. Not knowing the venue, this may not be part of the problem. It also depends on whether or not the ensemble is acoustic or electric. With electric you could point the speakers in different ...


5

Resonant Frequency Good guitars have the wooden top and body of the guitar carefully carved to resonate at a certain single frequency. While the luthier is carving and bracing the top of the guitar, long before the guitar is assembled and the strings are put on, he repeatedly taps the top with a knuckle, as if it were a drum, and listens to the fundamental ...


5

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


4

Having the piano with the back against the wall will slightly boost the treble frequencies, but not much. Loudness is the main factor. The piano will be quieter with the back directly against the wall because you're closing off the sound board which is on the back. Leaving a few inches of space between the piano and wall will significantly increase the ...


4

Answering my own question after a fair amount of research. A steel string sounds different than a nylon string Unlike a nylon string, a steel string does not vibrate like an ideal string, because it has a significant inner stiffness. This has the effect, that the partials/harmonics are not exact multiples of the fundamental, but are shifted towards higher ...


4

I imagine when your palm is muting the strings, you are picking them from a different angle or using a different muscle in your arm or wrist that is supplying more energy to the attack. When you attack with your pick deeper in the strings, it tends to be generally louder because it takes more energy for your hand to pull the pick across.


4

First of all, Pythagorean (PT), Just Intonation (JT) and Equal Temperament (ET) are different (families of) tunings. Therefore, note frequencies will be different in each case. You can find frequency charts for them on Wikipedia. For any tuning, you need a reference frequency. Currently, 440 Hz for A above middle C is the most widely used standard. But ...


3

If you can't treat the room, you can try optimizing using the sound system and the band. Control sound radiation so it beams as much as possible towards the audience and absorptive surfaces and away from any reflective surfaces. Monitor wedges are the worst. They beam up and back directly at backwall and ceiling. Wedges have their place on large stages but ...


3

"I see another answer explains that the positioning is to "hear yourself better", but this will be hardly the case for bass amps, since those wavelengths are not very directional. Bass amp isolation from the floor will make little to no difference; low frequencies, the ones produced by the bass, are omnidirectional (unless a special system is used, which is ...


3

The clarinet has a cylindrical bore, which makes it behave as a closed tube, odd harmonics. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bore_(wind_instruments)


3

Just a thought. The neck pup on Telecasters is placed exactly under a harmonic node. I found this when I 'lost' the double octave on mine, playing the harmonic at that point (24th fret position - which, on Telecasters, obviously has no fret), When I changed from neck pup to bridge pup, the harmonic was audible again. It MAY be that as the neck pup and the ...


3

Assuming A = 440 Hz, the octave starting on Middle C has the frequencies (in Hz): C♭ = 244.1687412149232 C = 260.74074074074076 (B♯3 = 264.298095703125) D♭ = 274.6898338667886 C♯ = 278.4375 D = 293.3333333333333 E♭ = 309.02606310013715 D♯ = 313.2421875 F♭ = 325.5583216198976 E = 330.0 F = 347.65432098765433 E♯ = 352.3974609375 G♭ = 366.2531118223848 F♯ = ...


2

The Jay-Mitchell-Donut seems to work quite well. Haven't tried it myself though, but may do so in the near future.


2

Could you provide us with the wave sample that you analyzed, so as we hear it ? Also could you zoom the spectrum window from 150Hz to 330Hz... because at this zoom level, the curve is obviously not accurate at all, then provide us the image at this level ( from E3 to E4). Maybe have you simply played a EM or Em chord wich contains a strong B at the fifth ...



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