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24

On some types of whistle if you blow really hard you can get the second harmonic, sounding one octave higher than the fundamental. A recorder is essentially a whistle with the length of the resonating chamber controlled by the fingers, and you can very easily overblow an octave. Brass instruments more easily play their overtones because you're in direct ...


21

The pitch difference will be very slight, so some very good ears might notice, but it's likely that many of the instruments will be slightly out of tune to a greater degree than the doppler effect caused at marching speed. Based on the fomula from the Wikipedia page, and assuming a marching musician moves about .5 meters per second away from the listener, ...


19

Because of dynamics called room modes. Room modes are the collection of resonances that exist in a room when the room is excited by an acoustic source such as a loudspeaker. (...) each frequency being related to one or more of the room's dimension's or a divisor thereof. To keep things simple, we will assume the room has 6 parallel walls (right prism ...


18

Noise cancellation never works on scales larger than the sound's wavelength, so it's only useful for headphones. Modifying the hall physically is the only real solution to this problem. Short of that, the first thing to try is indeed to bring the sound as directly to the audience as possible, by using a suitable PA arrangement. Big, single speakers located ...


16

It's because of the pseudo-compression that using distortion effect gives. The same will be true if you use a clean channel with a compressor, or if your amp has a natural compressing effect, as many do. What's happening is... You play a chord normally: You get quite nice mid-range strum of the strings, nothing surprising there. You play a palm muted ...


15

The perception of a pitch is due to the frequency of vibration of the hairs in the cochlea (the spiral-shaped organ in the inner ear), which is, in turn, driven by the vibration of the eardrum. Anything that drives the eardrum at a given frequency, say 440 Hz, will be perceived as the same pitch, regardless of medium. What the medium does affect, however, ...


14

First of all, when using or abbreviating a unit named after a person (in this case, Alexander Graham Bell), it is customary to capitalize the abbreviation, so the most respectful way to write the common measurement of the ratio between to values is dB. Capitalization is not used when the unit is spelled out with a scale prefix ("deci-", in this case), but ...


12

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


12

The reason that you can get multiple notes from a bugle is that you can vary your embouchure. If you tighten your mouth, and blow harder, you'll get a higher note because your lips move faster. The bugle is essentially an amplifier of the sound that you make with your lips. It can only amplify frequencies that it resonates to, which is why the bugle has a ...


11

Yes, but this phenomenon is easily explained by classical physics. If you hold down the sustain pedal on a piano (thus releasing the strings to vibrate freely), any instrument nearby playing a tone that is matched by one of the piano strings will cause that string to vibrate in sympathy. The tone provided by the voice, trombone, second piano, violin, etc. ...


11

Yes, this can definitely happen to a noticeable degree. Let's say there's a block of trumpets facing the audience, and the drill has alternate columns move forwards and backwards. If the step size is 6-to-5 (6 steps to go 5 yards) at a tempo of mm=160, this means that each player is moving at over 2 m/s. The combined relative speed difference of 4 m/s is ...


10

When you pluck a guitar string you are always generating all of the harmonics to varying degrees. For your E2 N: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Note: E2 E3 B3 E4 G#4 B4 (D4) E5 D5 G#5 (n/a) B5 ... N; ratio of harmonic's frequency to the fundamental frequency 7th harmonic is pretty badly tuned in equal ...


10

JCPedroza's answer is correct for a square room, but I think it's worth pointing out that the shape of the room is not just it's dimensions. For example, a square room with an open window will act different than if the window is shut. In acoustics, we often model the response of a room as a circuit. If you break up the space into pieces, each piece can be ...


10

You’re not parsing your sentence right. You should understand “An eighth note at [quarter equals 120] is 0.25 seconds long.” “A quarter = 120” is a tempo indication meaning “you should play 120 quarters per minute”, i.e. a quarter last half a second. An eighth note thus lasts half that, that is 1/4 second.


9

Top end refers to the treble tones on your guitar and bottom end refers to the bass tones; these are also referred to as 'highs' and 'lows'; and can be adjusted using the EQ on your amp.


8

Saxophones and oboes are conical, and behave like closed conical pipes. They are closed at the reed, just like the clarinet. Flutes are cylindrical, and behave like open cylindrical pipes. The sound is made by blowing across the opening at the head joint, and it is not closed like in other woodwinds. Clarinets are cylindrical like the flute, but closed ...


8

The crucial difference in this regard, between guitars and bowed strings, is in which direction the strings vibrate. A bow causes vibration in the plane you're moving (it moves the string by friction: the string sticks on the rosin and is "dragged along" some way; perpendicular vibrations are strongly damped by the bow-hair). Because you can't vary the ...


7

Although some people would disagree to it's very existence, beaming is something you aren't really going to be able to properly tame. It's the nature a speaker cone to "beam" and people sell some nifty little gadgets that are supposed to fix the problem. Those gadgets may help you out a little bit, and as a matter of fact my friends old Matchless DC-30 has a ...


7

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


7

Summary A whistle with a much smaller resonating chamber has only a very small set of frequencies it resonates at. A bugle, much longer with a horn on one end, resonates at many frequencies. Both start with broadband noise, but the whistle can only resonate at one frequency, while the bugle can resonate at several. Therefore the bugler can adjust the ...


7

If you can cause the tympanic membrane of a normal-hearing human to vibrate 440 times per second, they will "hear" the pitch we call A4. So, there are two ways to go with your question. A device that is designed to produce 440 Hz here on Earth is designed to cause normal earth air at normal air pressure to vibrate 440 times per second. In significantly ...


6

The Musica Universalis stretches the idea of music, in the same way that describing courtship as a "dance" stretches the idea of dance. As such, your hope to find melody in there is optimistic at best. Middle C - C4 - is 261.62 Hz; that is 261.62 vibrations per second. C-1 is 8.17 Hz, which you get by halving the frequency 5 times. It's inaudible, but it ...


6

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


6

The issue with a lot of ear protection is that it doesn't attenuate frequency evenly across the board. In particular, it will tend to reduce treble and mids more than bass, leaving you with a rather muffled sound. There are a number of ear plugs that seek to address this and provide even volume attenuation across the spectrum. For $10-12 Etymotics sell ...


6

I know that sometimes for concerts there will be "shells" around the ensemble, curving down and around the group. This will help reduce any noise escaping backwards. Not knowing the venue, this may not be part of the problem. It also depends on whether or not the ensemble is acoustic or electric. With electric you could point the speakers in different ...


6

You don't have to modify the room to add physical damping to it. Velvet drapes absorb a lot of sound, even when they don't actually cover any surface, and would be very sympathetic to the decor. A few loose rugs covering unused floor areas, where the audience isn't directly looking at them, would also help a lot. The drapes and rugs could be put in place ...


6

In your question, you use the word "tonality", but I do not think it means what you think it means. Tonality refers to a certain harmonic vocabulary, especially involving the use of dominant-tonic chord relationships. You are asking about the tone quality, or timbre, of an instrument, and what could be refered to as its harmonicity. More frequently, we refer ...


5

If you can't treat the room, you can try optimizing using the sound system and the band. Control sound radiation so it beams as much as possible towards the audience and absorptive surfaces and away from any reflective surfaces. Monitor wedges are the worst. They beam up and back directly at backwall and ceiling. Wedges have their place on large stages but ...


5

Each red line represents a loudness level (measured in phons). That is, for a given red line, every point on that line is perceived as equally loud. This is a way of representing a 3d graph on a 2d medium. The x and y axes are sound frequency and sound pressure level (decibels), respectively. The z axis is a subjective measure, "Loudness". Now, we have ...



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