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10

There are those of us out there who have a "heavy hand" when it comes to pick attack. The reasons for this are many. For example, I developed a heavy hand because I learned how to play on an acoustic guitar first--and I play expressively. Expressive players, the ubiquitous example of which is a blues player, need a little extra space to accomodate variations ...


9

Usually when you restring an acoustic guitar, it will feel, and play, slightly different for a while. New strings that are fresh on the guitar tend to feel a little firmer and heavier to the fingers, but as time goes by they will start to feel a little less tense as they begin to stretch. Are you absolutely sure that they are the same gauge strings? The ...


9

First of all, I would check whether the neck is straight. Place a ruler against the frets (the edge of the ruler against the frets) and if there is any space between any of the frets and the ruler, the neck is not entirely straight. If there is no access to any sort of truss rod adjustment, then you will probably have to put up with the high action. If ...


7

Short answer: Yes, you're in for more fret buzz, and the solution will require a truss rod adjustment. Long answer: The 10's have more string tension than 9's will have. This means the 10's will exert a stronger tendency to bow the neck than the 9's, and therefore your guitar tech had to tighten the truss rod to compensate. When you put the 9's on, the ...


7

It sounds like the neck is not straight. Ensure it is bolted or otherwise attached to the body, and then check up at the nut for an allen wrench slot. Many necks have an adjustable tension (truss) rod. ( see: http://www.tunemybass.com/bass_setup/adjusting_neck_relief.html ) When done improperly, this can break the neck, so...don't break the neck.


6

Your guitar may need to be "set up" properly. This means getting it into its best playing condition, and in particular, it includes adjusting the height of the strings above the fretboard (called the "action"). If the action is too high, the strings will be difficult to press down, just as you are experiencing. If the action is too low, the strings will buzz ...


4

Right. "Action" is always a compromise. Playing ease and string buzz. If you are a delicate and precise player, you can get away with a very low action. If you like to "dig in" (as bluegrass players say), you'll need a bit more relief to avoid buzz.


4

The harder you play, the wider the string vibrates, the more likely that they will hit the strings, sounding clangy and robbing you of sustain and tone. Also, you can get your fingers under the other strings when you bend.


4

"Fret buzz" is normally caused by the vibrating string touching a fret in between the fretted note and the bridge. Usually, about midway as that's where the amplitude of vibration (the amount the string moves) is the greatest. Causes are normally a too-low action, a raised fret, a warped neck.... As noted, the truss rod adjusts the neck relief between the ...


4

There are a few things that come to mind in this situation, especially for an older instrument. These are in decreasing order of probability, at least in my experience. The nut is worn There could be one or more frets that are higher than the others There could be a loose fret at the lower end of the neck that needs to be reseated. Just FYI, adjusting ...


3

Well, you have two choices I guess. 1) Use a pair of calipers to determine the precise size wrench needed for the specific guitar you own right now. Or find out through some other means (e.g., by contacting the manufacturer and asking what wrench size is needed). 2) Buy a multitool which will have the right size for now and also probably for any other ...


3

Have it set up by a professional guitar tech. They can adjust the nut, the bridge and the truss rod to reduce the action. The action being too high will also explain your difficulty bending. You've already bent the string some amount just by fretting. The higher the action, the more tension you have to add.


3

The benefits of higher action go to lack of buzz. You can pick harder, which is nice for certain musics. I think it helps harmonics a little. I suppose there's some "You gotta want it, Rocky!" aspects, but really, yeah, high action is mostly something that'll keep beginners from moving forward.


3

"As close as you're gonna get... all electric guitars have some buzz when not plugged in" This is actually pretty true. Removing all traces from buzz requires a machine precision fret job, a perfect setup, and a ton of preventative maintainence (your frets wear, thus throwing the alignment off etc.). It also depends on how heavy handed you are. People who ...


3

This distance is known as the "action". Three things affect the action. The height of the nut - adjustable by shaving, shimming, replacing The height of the bridge - method of adjusting depends on the guitar type The curvature of the neck - on steel strung guitars, adjusted using the truss rod All of these can be adjusted, but it's really a job for a ...


2

It's a balancing act between playability and buzz, given that the guitar is set up properly to begin with. Yes, if you are getting buzz with 10s going to a lighter gauge will likely make it worse. If you have an adjustable bridge, raising the action slightly at the bridge should improve things. Are the open strings buzzing? If not, then the action at the ...


2

If you're lucky, you can adjust the truss rod and/or shave (and/or shim) the bridge. If you're unlucky, your bridge is peeling off. Take it to a shop to get looked at.


2

I agree on the set-up. Many guitars are shipped with the action purposefully high, as the manufacturer knows picky experienced guitarists will adjust to taste. The action at the nut is critical for playing ease. A good set-up will let you use heavier strings as well, which will likely improve sound.


2

The truss rod is only part of the story behind the action. Often all that is needed is the height adjustment of the saddles on the bridge.On electrics this is straightforward, but on acoustics (as I believe the OP has) it's more complex.It could entail shaving some off the base of the saddle, a job for the pro., or just screwing a screw either side, to take ...


2

First for the selector. Is the crackle sound just when switched or persistent when in one position? In the first case, compressed air and contact cleaner have always worked well for me on my near-20 years old Strat. In the second case might as well be the wires/soldering/pickups. For the tuning part, "tremolo" bridges need always a little more work to get ...


2

Your guitar appears to be a nylon-strung classical guitar, and as such may not have a truss rod. However, it's worth going on to answer the question in general: Unless you have a very unusual guitar, a truss rod tool is either a hex key or a hex socket. These are common fittings in all kinds of fields, not just musical instruments: bikes, self-assembly ...


1

Go down to your local hardware store and try various hex wrenches until you find the one that fits snugly. Then buy it there.


1

I own a Jackson Warrior WRXT with a Floyd Rose but I never faced any such problems. It must have something to do with the string company/quality. In a Floyd Rose you probably cut off the end to string it, probably why you're facing this problem so I would suggest stringing it the other way round without cutting the tip. Hope it helps. Regards Jimmy


1

The last time I played a guitar with a Floyd Rose is long ago, but I do remember having some unwinding problems in the beginning, too. Then I discovered, that some strings come with a bit of "unwinding protection" at the end (I don't know, if that's its official purpose, but what I mean, is a short, somewhat thicker part). The trick for me was buying the ...


1

The fact that the gap at high frets is increasing would make me think of a bend in the neck or the front of the body of the guitar first. Can you check to see if the neck is true and straight? If the neck is bent you may be able to adjust it if it has a truss rod, but if it doesn't then your only option is top take it to a luthier or guitar repair shop.


1

Re: the tuning. It is always best to have a pro do this, but with adjustable saddle and an electric tuner, you can try doing it yourself first. The basic idea is to tune all the open strings according to the tuner, then fret the note at the 12th fret(one octave up). The 12th fret note should be in tune. If the 12th fret note is off, adjust the saddle, retune ...



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