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William Sethares, creator of "xenotality" and "exotonality," wrote a book called Tuning, Timbre, Spectrum, Scale. According to Dave Benson in Music: A Mathematical Offering p. 490: The basic thesis of this book is the idea, first put forward by John Pierce, that the harmonic spectrum or timbre of an instrument determines the most appropriate scales ...


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Anything can inspire creation of mathematical systems expressed in music. However, whether the connection is actually less tenuous than any kind of voodoo is a different question. In the manner you pose the question, I don't think that it can be answered positively with an approach reasonably called justifiable. One obvious problem here is that Fourier ...


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Here's one possibility, MySong by Dan Morris and others. The technical paper there is worth a read, and its introduction has further references which will probably be worth hunting down. This system doesn't actually play along - it requires a vocal/lead line to be input first, runs an analysis to determine key and fits chords etc. then plays back. Though ...


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Yes! What I find fascinating is you can find mathematical thinking is many different music styles. Two books that examine 'classical' style: The Math Behind the Music (Outlooks) by Leon Harkleroad Link: http://amzn.com/0521009359 A Geometry of Music: Harmony and Counterpoint in the Extended Common Practice (Oxford Studies in Music Theory) by Dmitri ...


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I am not certain how your {x,y} pairs map to notes; treating them as chords: echo '{1,2} {1,3} ...' | tr '{},' '<> ' | perl -ple '%p2n=qw/1 c 2 d 3 e 4 f 5 g 6 a 7 b 8 c'\'' 9 d'\''/; s/(\d)/$p2n{$1}'\''/g' | ly-fu --absolute --open --silent - produces which appears unsatisfactory, so perhaps instead the {x,y} blocks are subsequent notes over ...


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Years ago I played around with a language called KeyKit. It represents music as phrase objects and has concepts of notes, chords plus a ton of functions for manipulating and generating music both via coding and by using built-in, simplified graphical controllers. I think that the language is fairly simple to learn. I think the guy that created it still ...



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