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8

You will have a very small amount of extra wear and tear on that machine head and the groove in the nut that string passes through, but aside from that this should cause no damage to an acoustic or electric guitar. The change in tension on the neck from that one shift is not significant, in fact you can get a greater change from atmospheric conditions. So ...


7

This should be possible with any type of guitar. Since you are detuning the low E string, i.e. there is less tension overall, this should not be the cause of string breakage. What were you using as a reference tone, are you sure you were tuning the guitar correctly?


6

Although it seems straight forward and simple, this is actually a tricky question. The tuning you describe is simply standard tuning - except one whole step flat. Everything Bob Broadley said in his answer is theoretically correct with one minor glitch (for G to F) created by the harmonica makers. In the example you used for your guitar tuning, if you ...


6

Anything that achieves the sound you're after is a valid technique! That said, a guitar (for example) out of tune with itself will usually sound a bit unpleasant to most ears. However ... If you listen to Led Zep's Black Dog, the guitars are played twice, panned left and right, and just a touch out of tune with each other. I don't know whether this is ...


5

A seven string guitar is not needed. There are bariton guitars that are specifically made for lower tunings. Detuning a normal six string guitar is also very common. Since detuning usually means putting thicker strings on the guitar, one thing to look out for is the nut. The slots might need to be widened to accommodate the thicker strings. Another issue ...


5

It's not commonly used, but it's not unheard of. For instance, Simon and Garfunkels song Cecelia has a detuned guitar in it's percussive introduction. In the art world it's sometimes done in a more regimented way to produce microtonal music, which is more like intentionally tuning to a precise pitch between the notes you'd find on a keyboard. It can also ...


5

Given that the bottom E and A are two octaves higher,a .010 and .007 will tune to that. The middle two, one octave higher, will need .014 and .008, and the top two, as standard can be .012 and .010. All I've done is calculate each string as a close approximation to a standard open guitar string, given its open pitch. These can be changed by about 10% either ...


5

There are Nashville strings intended for similar usage. Other manufacturers than D'Addario likely has similar strings. You want two octaves higher on the E and A though, so it seems making your own set like Tim suggests is the way to go in this specific case.


5

Unfortunately, it's a bit more complicated than that. There is no single "Just Intonation System"; instead, there are multiple systems which can be said to be just, by virtue of the fact that they use just intervals (i.e. integer frequency ratios). The problem is in determining which ratios you want to use. One such Just system is the Pythagorean system, ...


4

A similar question to this was asked over the last couple of weeks. I guess the guitar has a vibrato. In this case, as the strings are loosened, it makes the springs in the vibrato relatively stronger, thus they pull the remaining strings tighter, and so, higher in pitch.This is a phenomenon associated with vibratos (trems), and is basically the nature of ...


4

You seem to have several confusions. First of all, 12-tone equal temperament does not, and cannot have perfect fifths defined as exactly 3/2. It is impossible by definition. In 12TET, all half steps must be the same size, and there must be twelve of them in an octave. This means that whatever factor (x) you multiply a frequency by to raise it a half step ...


4

You already know some of the ratios. An octave is 2:1. A just/pure fifth is 3:2. (A perfect fifth may not have this exact ratio, by the way. More on that later.) If you divide an octave into twelve equal parts, you need a number that, when multiplied by itself 12 times, equals two. That is . (Read it as "the twelfth root of two.") It's approximately equal ...


4

Standard tuning on the guitar is E A D G B E, from the lowest/thickest string (6) to the highest/thinnest (1). Therefore, tuning the guitar strings down to D G C F A D, from lowest to highest, will make them each exactly a whole-tone lower (the same as two semitones, or two frets, if you like). Therefore, playing the music on your detuned guitar, in the ...


4

He is playing a C shape chord for the F chord with the capo on 5th fret is my guess. Why do that? It's just to avoid playing the F barre chord at 1st fret. Keep your guitar in standard tuning. The song is played with standard tuning and traditional chords. Watch other videos for examples.


3

Major edit after OP's clarification I'm pulling nomenclature from a paper written by Myles Skinner, a microtonal community wiki, and Wikipedia. I'll refer to quarter tone intervals as decimals between the semitone intervals. 3.5 is pretty universally called a neutral third. That's from all three of the sources and personal experience. It's a good ...


3

You should consult the D'Addario string company's extensive charts on different string gauges for alternate tunings. It covers steel strings and nylon strings, for guitar and more. Check it out. D'Addario Catalog Supplement/ String Tension Specifications/ A complete technical reference for fretted instrument string tensions


3

The point of unequal well-tempered tunings is that the keys don't sound the same. Temperaments like Werckmeister III or Vallotti or 18th century French ordinaire are meant to be usable in any key while letting each have its own colour. (Vallotti is quite commonly used on fortepianos.) For most of what you're doing, you could probably get away with a mean ...


3

I've been using regular minor thirds ("diminished") tuning for 20 years. As best I can tell, this was also Django Rheinhardt's secret trick. Some early delta blues players used it as well. The tuning lacks a bit of range, and I make up for this by making the highest interval (2nd to 1st string) increase by a perfect fifth (7 frets) instead of minor 3rd. ...


3

This will not hurt the guitar, especially since you're only adjusting one string. Even with more general tuning changes, e.g. changes to open D, you won't hurt the guitar; the worst side-effect might be sub-optimal neck relief. Re-tuning will tend to wear the strings more; causing them to break more easily, but I've noticed this more on the thinner ...


3

Since you're only loosening one string, and for a short while, no harm in that. The other strings may change their tuning slightly in the process, but that's o.k. Those DGs are good guitars, but consider keeping it, and having two when you upgrade - one standard, one D-tuned. Yes, on electrics, it's the same, except those vibrato-equipped will probably have ...


2

Assuming it's a standard scale bass, then I'd go 45, 65, 85, 105, 130 for the G, D, E, A and low B.The very low F#/E would be 150/155/160. The top C could be around 30, depending whether you need a bendable top or not.All these are +or- .005, to preferences of easier to fret, or fatter bass tone. Play it straight away, after the intonation has been ...


2

Equal temperament is key-agnostic. Well-tempered tuning isn't. The point of well-tempered tuning is that all keys are tolerable, but some are still better than others and each has its own character. This own character was pretty much the whole point of Bach's "Wohltemperirtes Clavier" (it is usually assumed that some Werckmeister tuning reflects the ...


2

This seems like more than one question. Short answers: Yes, that is the way with alot (clearly not all) tunings. You can fight it, but a capo or a different tuning might be a better answer for a different key. Look deep into learning Travis picking, there is a whole world of serious finger picking there. There is much to learn well beyond the basic ...


2

I play seven string guitar, and in the seven string community there are those guitarists who prefer a high A over a low B. One such fellow got tired of the lack of options and started making custom very-thin strings. His website is Octave4plus.com


2

There have been literally hundreds of alternate tunings, used to play music on a six string guitar. They are now called "alternate" tunings because there is a commonly accepted "standard" tuning for 6 string guitar that we are all familiar with. So anything that deviates from "standard tuning" is now referred to as an "alternate tuning". Many of the ...


2

Beyond the most common tunings, there isn't a hard and fast classification system. I would just generally call the tuning you give in the question as an "open tuning" as it relates to an open chord. Slide guitarists often use this kind of terminology referring to open C or open G tunings. In some older guitar music it was customary to give the tuning up ...


2

I change my tuning all the time, including using DADGBE as you do and have had the same guitar for a decade, with no problems as a result. Especially since you are just slightly changing the tuning of the low E string, which is your strongest, I doubt it will even have an impact on the strength of the string. It is NEVER my first to pop!


1

The root of the problem is : how to name chords with quarter tones? I myself have no idea how, to my knowledge quarter tones are either central to a style where chords are second-class citizens at best (indian music) or assigned to either major or minor context at a given time (blue notes). So if you're using classic western harmony, as you seem to consider ...


1

In Pythagorean tuning, the pitches are generated by compounding perfect (just intonated) fifths, one way to do this is to go symmetrically outward from a central pitch, octave reducing. C F-C-G Bf-F-C-G-D Ef-Bf-f-C-G-D-A Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E Df-Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E-B Gf-Df-Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E-B-Fs Note that Gf, Fs generated this way are very close in ...


1

In general, the longer the scale length - the more stable a string will be as the tension is lowered and the pitch follows. A thicker gauge string will allow you to fudge the numbers a bit and get lower, but usually at the expense of intonation, which in terms of what you're looking for; you'll need to adjust for anyway. So possibility? Anything is ...



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