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12

To answer the question directly - yes, strings are supposed to be EADGBE - in standard tuning. All tabs should have the tuning notes at the beginning. If there are none, assume it's standard. There are many different tunings that can be used for guitar, drop D, for example, where the fat E is tuned a tone lower, to D. This above is open C, as each note is ...


8

I didn't know this before, but after doing research on other sites I found that this type of tuning is called Open C Tuning. Here are some references on guitar tuning that I found to be useful: Electric tuner [Hear the notes] How to tune guitar to different modes. List of guitar tunings.


7

The simple, short answer is that practically all families of instruments started out with just intonation and continued that way well into the 19th century (the 1800s). The exception is keyboard instruments, and fretted instruments tuned in fourths, such as the guitar, and before it the lute and the viola da gamba. Keyboard and guitar-family instruments ...


6

There is absolutely no "rule of thumb" for any specific tuning which would correspond best to any specific song. There is no tuning which is preferable for fingerstyle guitar. The most we can say is that a tuning may be useful to play a specific song, a specific arrangement of a song, or in a specific key. You may find it helpful to look to the following ...


5

Given that the bottom E and A are two octaves higher,a .010 and .007 will tune to that. The middle two, one octave higher, will need .014 and .008, and the top two, as standard can be .012 and .010. All I've done is calculate each string as a close approximation to a standard open guitar string, given its open pitch. These can be changed by about 10% either ...


5

There are Nashville strings intended for similar usage. Other manufacturers than D'Addario likely has similar strings. You want two octaves higher on the E and A though, so it seems making your own set like Tim suggests is the way to go in this specific case.


4

Banjo ukuleles are typically tuned the same as regular ukuleles: GCEA. The current tuning you have on your banjo uke is alternative. A tenor scale ukulele is 17 inches (43 cm) measured from the nut to the saddle, so if your banjo ukulele has the same scale length, you should be able to put standard tenor scale ukulele strings on it and tune it to GCEA. ...


4

As per the app you were asking, Pythagorean is the temperament you're looking for. The perfect fifth is the 2:3 frequency ratio (and small rational number frequency ratios are required for the sympathetic vibrations to work). So if your A string is 440 Hz, the tuning is as follows: E 660Hz A 440Hz D 293.33Hz G 195.56Hz If you tune by ear from A, your ...


4

A similar question to this was asked over the last couple of weeks. I guess the guitar has a vibrato. In this case, as the strings are loosened, it makes the springs in the vibrato relatively stronger, thus they pull the remaining strings tighter, and so, higher in pitch.This is a phenomenon associated with vibratos (trems), and is basically the nature of ...


3

The modern name for tuning the strings to different pitches than the standard ones is called alternate tuning. The traditional, academic name for this in classical music is scordatura. In the Hawaiian tradition it is called slack key tuning. There are several prominent guitarist/composers who have made extensive use of many different alternate tunings. ...


3

Some songs have different tunings, such as Drop D, Open G (Some Rolling Stones songs). The tabs you showed us, as the others said is tuned in Open C. As you get a hang of the thing you'll notice that this is a normal practice!


2

There are two tunings for the soprano: one, most commonly used in the west, is GCEA This tuning is also standard for concert size. The second tuning for soprano is my favourite and not so common in the modern era: ADF#B (All Dogs Fear sharp Bites! - yes, I made that one up...). This tuning is not for use with a concert size. From a soloists point of view, ...


2

On a standard scale length guitar this is a problem - you want to look at really increasing your gauge on that low string, but no matter what, it is going to be much 'flappier' than the higher strings. You can raise the action to compensate for this or change your playing style. I play a 7 string with an ADADGBE tuning, and I have to be really delicate with ...


2

I play seven string guitar, and in the seven string community there are those guitarists who prefer a high A over a low B. One such fellow got tired of the lack of options and started making custom very-thin strings. His website is Octave4plus.com


1

This is common for all guitars, with and without a tremolo, in my experience. I have noticed this happen on my acoustic and two different electrics. The guitar's neck is angled so the tension of the strings, when in tune, will cause it to assume the correct shape. Without strings, the neck will relax and be straighter/longer than it would be when strung. ...


1

If you want a really technical discussion that uses serious math, you can get Richard Mark French, Engineering the Guitar. (It's available as an ebook on Kindle.) He deals with scale length, intonation, the physics of ideal and real strings, etc., etc. The math is, frankly, beyond me, but it is an exhaustive treatment.


1

The Nashville tuning, there are strings for this, you can read all about it here http://www.wikihow.com/Tune-Your-Guitar-to-Nashville-Tuning


1

If you want to know about fret placement on guitar-family instruments, please see the answers I gave to this question in which I provided information about modern guitars which can play in just intonation or various types of meantone temperament.


1

If anyone is familiar with Kevin Cadogan and his work on the debut self-titled album by Third Eye Blind, then you know that half of those songs are in alternate tunings (at least 3 variations of open d suspended, as well as tuning to different hz, i.e. semi charmed life is in A448 to sound brighter). Kevin recorded most of those guitar tracks with his ...


1

This is an area of much interest to me so if I may share my thoughts and experience which is a lot years of still trying to figure it out . Multiple guitars would be the best answer and each would have to be set up a accordingly. I play acoustic and use many open tunings though not many on the high side . A open C is what I am using as of right now on a ...


1

Your second tuning (C-A-D-G) is drop c, because the 'drop' part only refers to the lowest string. The first tuning you showed (C-G-C-F) would be D drop C, because every string is tuned down a whole step to D-G-F-C (D-standard tuning), and the lowest string is tuned down further to a C.


1

Drop tuning is totally trendy right now, every new metal band seems to use it, I tried to cover all the reasons why, because I love to use it as well: Easy to play Drop Tuning is very easy to play. It does not only provide the possibility to play most chords with only one finger, but also typical progressions in the metal genre are closer to each other ...


1

I think it's because.. It sounds "dirty" if distorted, because the lower you go the dirtier the distortion sounds. The looser string has a sound of its own; it's a bit more bassey and responds to palm-muting well because of extra looseness. It extends the musical range of your guitar by a full tone. Some chords are not just easier, they're possible with ...


1

as an addition to previous answers, it also makes certain riffs possible at higher speeds that would be extremely difficult without it. A great example of this is BYOB by System of a down, and Beast and the Harlot, by Avenged Sevenfold It's a trick as old as the hills. There are examples of it at least as early as Led Zeppelin in rock music. Like other ...



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