Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

To answer the question directly - yes, strings are supposed to be EADGBE - in standard tuning. All tabs should have the tuning notes at the beginning. If there are none, assume it's standard. There are many different tunings that can be used for guitar, drop D, for example, where the fat E is tuned a tone lower, to D. This above is open C, as each note is ...


8

I didn't know this before, but after doing research on other sites I found that this type of tuning is called Open C Tuning. Here are some references on guitar tuning that I found to be useful: Electric tuner [Hear the notes] How to tune guitar to different modes. List of guitar tunings.


7

Standard tuning for solo violin in classical music is just intonation. Tune the A string and, from there, tune the other strings with just-intonated perfect fifths. Some times, as a compromise you may need to tune the violin temperate, for example when you need to play many open strings in duo/ensemble with a instrument not capable of just-intonation. ...


6

The simple, short answer is that practically all families of instruments started out with just intonation and continued that way well into the 19th century (the 1800s). The exception is keyboard instruments, and fretted instruments tuned in fourths, such as the guitar, and before it the lute and the viola da gamba. Keyboard and guitar-family instruments ...


5

There are a few aspects of your gutiars setup that make it not ideal to have to switch tunings. My peronal instrument (bass) can take many tunings to a point as the strings are more robust, but you end up with a few issues around the action (the angle of the neck relative to the body, which causes the fret buzz), the nut width and possibly the bridge setup. ...


4

It would not be dangerous for the bridge if the four strings you select to produce that tuning have about the same tension (measured in lbs or kg) as the strings used for standard tuning. The D'Addario string company publishes an elaborate reference guide for all the strings they sell for guitars and a few other instruments. You can download the PDF of this ...


4

As per the app you were asking, Pythagorean is the temperament you're looking for. The perfect fifth is the 2:3 frequency ratio (and small rational number frequency ratios are required for the sympathetic vibrations to work). So if your A string is 440 Hz, the tuning is as follows: E 660Hz A 440Hz D 293.33Hz G 195.56Hz If you tune by ear from A, your ...


4

I haven't made the picture, but looking at your picture, you have DGCF at the 10th fret, and E♭A♭D♭G♭ at the 11th fret, and all the notes repeat at the 12th fret. So just take the letters from the 10th and 11th frets, copy them down at the bottom, move the fret markers around to match your instrument, and you've got your DGCF fretboard.


3

The modern name for tuning the strings to different pitches than the standard ones is called alternate tuning. The traditional, academic name for this in classical music is scordatura. In the Hawaiian tradition it is called slack key tuning. There are several prominent guitarist/composers who have made extensive use of many different alternate tunings. ...


3

Banjo ukuleles are typically tuned the same as regular ukuleles: GCEA. The current tuning you have on your banjo uke is alternative. A tenor scale ukulele is 17 inches (43 cm) measured from the nut to the saddle, so if your banjo ukulele has the same scale length, you should be able to put standard tenor scale ukulele strings on it and tune it to GCEA. ...


3

Aquila makes a GDAE set for soprano ukes, but I don't think they sell a set with that tuning for concert scale. They do sell a CGDA concert length set, however.


3

You are working with a violin. It has four strings tuned in perfect fifths. Intonation on a violin, which has no frets, is something that you produce with your fingers, not with an electronic measuring device like your tuner. You can produce any kind of intonation or temperament on a violin that you can train your ears and fingers to recognize. You are not ...


3

As far as the strings breaking, that's just going to happen. The strings we use are designed for a certain amount of tension and when they are tuned up the increased tension leads to easier breakage. Heavier gauge strings will have higher tension also. So a lighter gauge may be helpful for you if you've been playing heavy ones but it will change your ...


3

A point for dropping to Eb is that it gives you open strings which have sustain. The style of jazz accompaniment, as epitomized by Freddie Green, is closed and muted strings all over the neck, on archtop guitars that are notable for the punchy attack but minimal sustain, so the benefit you get is being on the position marker rather than off it. I don't doubt ...


2

There are two tunings for the soprano: one, most commonly used in the west, is GCEA This tuning is also standard for concert size. The second tuning for soprano is my favourite and not so common in the modern era: ADF#B (All Dogs Fear sharp Bites! - yes, I made that one up...). This tuning is not for use with a concert size. From a soloists point of view, ...


2

Adding to Folau's answer, I've heard that there are certain types of string that will last longer too. By this I mean there's a difference between nickel/steel strings, and bronze strings. Personally I use Earnie ball cobalts and love them, but someone else will be able to give a more detailed rundown of what types last better.


2

On a standard scale length guitar this is a problem - you want to look at really increasing your gauge on that low string, but no matter what, it is going to be much 'flappier' than the higher strings. You can raise the action to compensate for this or change your playing style. I play a 7 string with an ADADGBE tuning, and I have to be really delicate with ...


1

If you want to know about fret placement on guitar-family instruments, please see the answers I gave to this question in which I provided information about modern guitars which can play in just intonation or various types of meantone temperament.


1

This is an area of much interest to me so if I may share my thoughts and experience which is a lot years of still trying to figure it out . Multiple guitars would be the best answer and each would have to be set up a accordingly. I play acoustic and use many open tunings though not many on the high side . A open C is what I am using as of right now on a ...


1

The best way is to obtain another guitar and have different gauge strings on each - lighter for the higher tunings and heavier for the lower. You are asking for a racehorse and a carthorse to do the same job. As you've already found out, it won't work.It will also be kinder to each guitar as the necks won't have to put up with differing tensions.Why you ...


1

Tuning to Eb can have a variety of advantages. When playing in a band with horns that are Eb and Bb instruments, tuning to Eb means that you use bar chords and play in their key much more easily. Having that lower Eb also means that for a tune in that key, you don't have to go up almost a whole octave to play the root note. It will also change the tone, ...


1

as an addition to previous answers, it also makes certain riffs possible at higher speeds that would be extremely difficult without it. A great example of this is BYOB by System of a down, and Beast and the Harlot, by Avenged Sevenfold It's a trick as old as the hills. There are examples of it at least as early as Led Zeppelin in rock music. Like other ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible