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I did it for you, since I was curious: Low A: .034 wound D: .028 wound G: .020 wound C: .017 plain E: .011 plain High A: .008 plain Total tension is almost exactly the same. Individual tensions are pretty close. One main difference between electric and acoustic strings that may come into play is that on electric guitars, the 3rd string is usually plain, ...


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Having spoken to a guitarist I work with who planted a mandolin neck onto his acoustic guitar complete with bridge and soundhole, and pup, (it works really well with both!) he said that he thinks of each as a separate instrument. Guitar chord shapes belong to one set, mandolin shapes to another, and the twain never meets. So, just like learning a new guitar ...


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If you understand intervals and chord tones, this should serve you well learning the mandolin, because you can learn a few "core" shapes and fingerings and then know how to modify then to get the full palette of chords. In this sense, your guitar knowledge shouldn't get in the way of learning mandolin. For example: learn the basic open major chords on the ...


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I would say scales are easier and chords are just different. It's almost like learning the same chords in a different position on the neck of the guitar that you've never learned before because that "position" doesn't even exist on guitar. It's also only four courses so it's a bit simplified. For example, an open G major chord is easy on mandolin: It's 0 0 2 ...


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You are correct that the songs will not be "broken" in the sense that they won't sound totally different. Every single note will sound lower, but the relationships between the notes will be preserved - because every note will be lowered by the same amount. As you note, that will make the overall song sound a little different. It will make each song sound ...



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