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There have been literally hundreds of alternate tunings, used to play music on a six string guitar. They are now called "alternate" tunings because there is a commonly accepted "standard" tuning for 6 string guitar that we are all familiar with. So anything that deviates from "standard tuning" is now referred to as an "alternate tuning". Many of the ...


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Beyond the most common tunings, there isn't a hard and fast classification system. I would just generally call the tuning you give in the question as an "open tuning" as it relates to an open chord. Slide guitarists often use this kind of terminology referring to open C or open G tunings. In some older guitar music it was customary to give the tuning up ...


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In Pythagorean tuning, the pitches are generated by compounding perfect (just intonated) fifths, one way to do this is to go symmetrically outward from a central pitch, octave reducing. C F-C-G Bf-F-C-G-D Ef-Bf-f-C-G-D-A Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E Df-Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E-B Gf-Df-Af-Ef-Bf-F-C-G-D-A-E-B-Fs Note that Gf, Fs generated this way are very close in ...


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You seem to have several confusions. First of all, 12-tone equal temperament does not, and cannot have perfect fifths defined as exactly 3/2. It is impossible by definition. In 12TET, all half steps must be the same size, and there must be twelve of them in an octave. This means that whatever factor (x) you multiply a frequency by to raise it a half step ...


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You already know some of the ratios. An octave is 2:1. A just/pure fifth is 3:2. (A perfect fifth may not have this exact ratio, by the way. More on that later.) If you divide an octave into twelve equal parts, you need a number that, when multiplied by itself 12 times, equals two. That is . (Read it as "the twelfth root of two.") It's approximately equal ...



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