Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The signal between an electric guitar and a guitar amp is called a signal voltage. The voltage in the line oscillates in a manner analogous to the strings' vibrations, summed. The level of the voltage is dependent on lots of things including string material, how much energy is in the strings, and the electronics of the guitar. There is no specific standard, ...


5

You should find out if it's your ears or your equipment. This could be done by taking your guitar to a music store and try it with some device that supports headphones, like the one below (there are other brands). That will bring the room out of the picture. If you don't feel pain, then one solution is to get one of those devices and practice with it instead ...


2

Well it sounds like the amp is the problem. If you've tried sitting in different positions and distances from the amp, in different rooms, different pickups, different channels, and you haven't had the problem sitting right next to a different amp or with an acoustic, I can't see what the problem could be. Ask other people what they think, it might not be ...


2

Check the battery for your pre-amp it may be low. You should never have to pound, only thump. Thump your guitar all over see if there is a sweet-spot. The bridge should be loudest. If you get a new guitar/pickup, make sure the pickup can handle a thump as some can distort easily. The guitar he uses in the video has a pre-amp, look at 32 seconds in same ...


2

My first move would be - on condition the valve bases are compatible - to take out the valves from one amp, and use them in the second. Of course, I'd make a recording of each, to have an A-B comparison. There is going to be a difference in the circuitry between the two, mostly in the pre-amp side, appertaining to eq. as much as anything, so a direct ...


1

Changing tubes requires a re-biasing. If you don't know what this means and don't have the proper equipment, then do not try anything like this. For your safety and your amp's safety. Simply being an octal power amp tube does not automatically make any two tubes 'switchable' and 'comparable'. Some amps have a built in bias switch to allow switching between ...


1

You don't need both the NS-2 and the Decimator, pick one. I like the NS-2 for high gain stuff. The ISP Decimator is not really a true gate so I might just ditch it. Your chain should be something like: NS-2 > compressor > chorus/phaser > delay. This is into the front of the amp. Loops are too finicky for my tastes, but you could go NS-2 to amp input, then ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible