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For Acoustic Guitar You probably can do a reasonable job using a keyboard amp with an acoustic guitar. You may need a pre-amp pedal (or similar) to boost the signal from your guitar in order to use it with a keyboard amp, and you may want to adjust the equalization when switching between guitar and keys, but other than that, acoustic guitars often sound ...


4

A valve and a tube are the same thing -- "tube" was originally more common in American English, while "valve" was more common in England. A "vacuum tube" is any one of a number of types of electronic component based around an arrangement of electrodes inside a sealed glass unit, from which all the air has been removed. The kind of tube used in amplification ...


4

Basically, yes. An amp is an essential part of a guitar's sound, tends to be overdriven somewhat (or has circuitry simulating the kind of overdrive a tube amp would show), has a single speaker with rather stiff fastenings and specific sound color covering a range up to something like 8kHz, no tweeters which would give overdrive a rather unpleasant color as ...


3

Guitar amplifiers reproduce sound very well in the range of notes (frequencies) that a guitar plays, but the sound quality is relatively poor outside that range. A keyboard can play a much wider range of notes, so a keyboard amplifier needs to be good at producing a wider range of frequencies. What this means is that a good keyboard amplifier will work ...


1

It does depend on how loud you mean by loud. For the purpose of practice, anything that makes your ears ring after playing might seem cool now, but take it from someone who can't hear that well anymore and has constant ringing in their ears because of loud music (I think it was a Pantera, or possibly dream theater concert that did it in the mid 90s) I would ...



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