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9

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


8

Most guitar amps have two amplification stages: The pre-amp which takes the very low signal levels output by the guitar and amplifies them to a higher level, approximately like line-level. The power-amp which takes the line-level signal and further amplifies it to drive the speaker. These are separate since different design considerations are important ...


7

The USB guitar link is for recording your guitar into a computer. Useful, but not relevant to your needs here. To play something like a CD player through a guitar amp, it is sometimes enough to connect the headphone output of the CD player, to the instrument input of the amp. You will need to turn the headphone volume right down, and turn down the ...


6

1) Wireless has nothing to do with this. Wireless goes from the guitar to the pedalboard (if there is one) and into the amplifiers. The amps will see a normal signal through a normal cable, cause that's all they know. A clean/dirty setup like you are describing can be done a multitude of ways. 2) Absolutely, read on for suggestion of what product does ...


6

Well, the general advice to avoid noise is to use as few pedals as possible, as each one raises the noise floor. A noise gate will act as a gain reducer until you send a signal over its threshold, so having a noise gate first is a good idea. (It does affect sustain and various other factors, but they are outside the scope of the question) The rest of your ...


5

To answer your question: Yes, he will need a separate amp if he wants to plug the guitar in and amplify the sound. A preamplifier (preamp) is an electronic amplifier that prepares a small electrical signal for further amplification or processing. The preamp is inside the acoustic-electric guitar (the preamp makes up the electric portion of acoustic-electric ...


5

The K20-X manual has a pretty thorough explanation of how to get overdriven sounds. http://www.deanmarkley.com/Info/LegacyAmps/Manuals/D1015.pdf In brief, an amp like this has two stages of amplification: the first stage "preamp" feeds into the main amplification stage. If you turn up the level of preamp, then there will be some distortion in the preamp ...


5

I would recommend using a keyboard amp. A keyboard amp will have the range and wattage to properly handle high and low frequencies. You could also try a bass amp, as most of them can cleanly accommodate clean high-end frequencies. You definitely won't be able to get the same sort of distortion/overdrive that you can from a Marshall but effects pedals ...


5

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


4

There are a couple of possible causes here, so you may need to use trial and error. First check what happens if you just plug the guitar straight into a clean channel. Any hiss? If so, the problem is with your guitar or amp. Swap one out to try and isolate the issue. Then use an overdrive channel. This is the most likely steep to introduce noise. If it ...


4

I think there potentially a misunderstanding here: Let's say you play an A3 (7th fret on the D string or 2nd fret on the G string). The pitch is A and the fundamental frequency is 220 Hz. However there are also many so-called harmonics, which are multiples of the fundamental. So you get 220Hz, 440Hz, 660Hz, 880Hz, 1100Hz, etc. In fact, majority of the energy ...


4

I think your approach would work. If there is a slanted cabinet, you could put it on the side, to get more area for your combo. The question is if it is worth it. If there are slanted cabinets already (which is the usual setup if only one 4x12 is used), then you will get some sound projected towards your ears. Not as much as you would with the combo on top, ...


4

The current model of the Roland Cube 15 is one of a new generation of guitar amplifiers which can also accommodate a signal from a digital piano. The Input jack is a 1/4-inch phone plug jack that is designed only for the signal from an electric guitar. This is a signal that is low in volume and high in impedance. Do not connect the signal from your ...


3

Noise comes from a lot of places, not just your effects. The best idea is to think your guitar, cables, effects and amplifier are a chain, and remember that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. The guitar's wiring can pick up hum from all sorts of electrical equipment, especially if it's an older guitar with single-coil pickups. A good repairman ...


3

If you're using active electronics, as silly as this sounds, verify that the battery isn't dead. I had a similar issue with my first bass, and it turned out to be the 5 dollar 9-volt battery-swap fix. After verifying that, as stated in the previous answer, see if you can pad the input somehow to make sure that you're not slamming the preamp.


3

The pickups could be clipping the input gain stage of your amplifier. I doubt it has anything to do with the knobs, since active electronics can give out a very hot signal. Can you give us more information on what you're using for an amplifier? What active electronics are you using, specifically? I doubt you'll kill the speakers if it is input clipping ...


3

This really depends on the amplifier design. What I say here relates to tube amps and my preferences. On small amps rated 30 watts or less with inefficient speakers, I like to crank the master and use the preamp volume or guitar volume to control actual loudness. The one time I was actually able to play with a true Dumble ODS, I found I liked the preamp ...


3

"I see another answer explains that the positioning is to "hear yourself better", but this will be hardly the case for bass amps, since those wavelengths are not very directional. Bass amp isolation from the floor will make little to no difference; low frequencies, the ones produced by the bass, are omnidirectional (unless a special system is used, which is ...


3

http://recording.org/hybrid-recording-forums/33092-what-frequencies-affected-tone-knobs-guitar.html Says Bass: ~70 - 200 Hz Mid: 250 Hz - 1 KHz (1 KHz = 1,000 Hz) Treble: 1.5 - 4 KHz Presence: 3 - ~7 KHz Cross referencing with this pitch/frequency guide http://www.phy.mtu.edu/~suits/notefreqs.html Gives: Bass: C#2 - G#3 Mid: B3 - C6 Treble: G6 - G7 ...


3

It's complicated, but the simple answer is: Post makes it louder. Presuming you have plenty of headroom in your post amplification stage, that should be all it does. Pre drives the input harder, causing more distortion. It does not necessarily make the overall output any louder, but it will tend to compress the peaks in a fuzzy sort of way, and if you ...


2

Figure out which one you like the best, get rid of the other one/trade for matched impedance/sensitivity, you'll end up happier in the future; by the way, parallel is the opposite of chaining (series). I wouldn't mongrelize to 12ohm/12ohm, you won't be able to adjust the amp (the multi-tap output transformer actually) to "see" the correct load on the output ...


2

If you parallel the two cabinets, the resulting nominal impedance will be around 5.3 ohms. This uneven load distribution not ideal; the lower ohmage Marshall cabinet will draw something like two thirds of the power. So on the grounds of power alone, it may be louder by several decibels, and if the speakers in the Marshall also happen to be more sensitive ...


2

Cats and scratching... yeah, I can relate. A great way to get the cat to stop it is to drape duct-tape, sticky side out, all over the sides where the cat likes to scratch. The second the cat gets sticky tape on its paws it'll change its mind about how fun it is to scratch that particular "post" and will leave it alone. This doesn't hurt the cat at all; ...


2

Try this Set Master to max and Channel to min audible volume, listen and see how it sounds Reverse this, set Channel to max and Master to min audible volume, listen and see how it sounds Which ever sounds better, sounds better. Like most question's of this ilk the only real answer is suck it and see I'm afraid. At the end of the day I'd be surprised if ...


2

Use the fx loop to insert delays and reverbs as the loop is after the preamp circuit. I've tried delays and verbs straight into the front of the amp and the sound can get messy when distortion is used as each repeat generated by the delay gets distorted (by the distortion). I would always put delays/verbs after distortion either using fx loop or a chain of ...


2

The answer would depend on how much money you want to spend. Here are my thoughts on your questions: All in ones have the advantage of... (drum roll) having all in one. A lot of amps have a lot of effects installed, so you won't have to buy effects. A lot of amps have compressors installed, so you won't have to buy a compressor etc. My amp is both for ...


2

With a couple of my smaller Peaveys, the amp. switch works in conjunction with the footswitch. When the amp. switch is 'on', the footswitch will then toggle between clean/dirty. You may have inadvertently switched the footswitch, which you may or may not usually use.Check the instructions (downloads available) before doing anything drastic. Do not swear at ...


2

I looked around for info about this amp and I found this picture of the amp: Based on this picture it looks like the drive switch will give you some distortion, although I doubt it will be the amount you want. This amp does not have the traditional gain knob so customizing the distortion would be hard. I would advise getting a better amp that can handle ...


2

Have you tried mechanically isolating the cabinets,as in resting them on carpet or rubber, rather than putting them on, I suspect, a hard surface which may even be a hollow floor - creating its own soundboard. You say that the hum is still there even when no speaker is connected. This will eliminate a suspect ground loop, which incidentally, shows up as very ...


1

Honestly, I've played bass for about four years, using the same basic Silvertone practice amp, it's not much, but definitely has served it's purpose. As everyone is saying above, pedals make a difference, especially when you use multiple. But now that I have had my off topic "Squirrel!" moment, I can safely tell you that nothing tops off bringing your bass ...



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