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12

No, it will not damage the speaker. The high tones of a guitar are simply not capable of damaging your bass amp. Even if the amp isn't really suitable for these high tones (and in many cases, they can actually play them just fine), the amp will perfectly survive them. No harm there. The other way around is a much worse idea, because deep bass tones tend to ...


12

There are mainly three factors to this: Powerful speakers need (or at least used to need) heavy magnets. Lightweight cabinets tend to be less “acoustically stable” than heavy ones. And more easily damaged when handled roughly. 50 Hz transformers need a lot of windings around fat iron cores. (Plus, tube amps also need output transformers. And, ...


8

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


8

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


8

The signal between an electric guitar and a guitar amp is called a signal voltage. The voltage in the line oscillates in a manner analogous to the strings' vibrations, summed. The level of the voltage is dependent on lots of things including string material, how much energy is in the strings, and the electronics of the guitar. There is no specific standard, ...


7

I don't think it will work with just a split cable. One complication is ground loops, which cause hum. I'd recommend to use a stereo pedal, or a dedicated AB/Y pedal. You might still get hum, but there are some remedies, like rotating the power plug 180 degrees and plug it in again for one of the amps, using an AB/Y pedal with ground lift, having isolated ...


7

Two basic philosophies. First is, set everything at 12 o'clock (halfway) and adjust everything up or down until it sounds right. Second is, dime everything (all the way) and back things down until it sounds right. If it doesn't already. There are other things to consider. A common metal thing is to max the bass and treble and pull back on ("scoop") the ...


7

You actually need a "Preamp" with a line-out port and any mic preamp will do the job. A guitar pickup is a passive device that is to weak to create a line level signal, so it needs to be amplified to the line level for your speaker. Most probably your speakers have only a "Line-in" port. Line level is ok, but with preamps you may reach higher levels ...


7

Would having the delay after the cab sim ruin it? No Would it sound different if the delay was in the effects loop? It depends. It depends on what kind of delay you are using and how it is changing the audio besides the actual delay portion. The power amp and speaker (or cab sim) in a guitar amp are kinda like an effect, sort of like a fixed EQ and ...


6

The biggest advantage for line out is that you don't have to worry about feedback, and that you can model the tone without worrying about positioning, angles, mics, bleeding, etc; which is a disadvantage of the mic-amp combo, you need to worry about a lot of things to be able to do it correctly. If you love the sound that comes out of the speakers of the ...


6

If the output jack is labeled line out it means it can be plugged into any line-level input, as those found in audio interfaces, so you should be safe. If your interface is "pro" grade, it can have Mic inputs and "Hi-Z" (or Instrument) inputs too, so check if it's the case and make sure you plug into the line inputs. Also, keep in mind that unless the ...


5

Depending on the multi effect pedal you have, you can do both. But for the simple case, if you are using distortion from the multi effect, use it connected to your guitar. If you're using only e.g. delay or reverb use it in the loop. If you're using distortion in the amp, it usually sounds better if delay is applied on the overdriven signal, and not on the ...


5

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


5

Are the mikes on the amps feeding a PA which feeds the audience ears, or are the amps making the sound for the audience themselves ? If they're going through a PA one way is to turn the volume of the amps down a bit (so they don't saturate the room & bleed onto each other), face them away from each other or use acoustic shields to isolate them (or just ...


5

You should find out if it's your ears or your equipment. This could be done by taking your guitar to a music store and try it with some device that supports headphones, like the one below (there are other brands). That will bring the room out of the picture. If you don't feel pain, then one solution is to get one of those devices and practice with it instead ...


5

One other thing that took me MANY years to realize. The best EQ and tone settings to please your ear in a room by yourself are going to be surprisingly different from the ideal tone when you play with other instruments, and especially when recording. For example, the best guitar sound when a keyboard / synth is playing chords is often much more treble than ...


5

Did you not get the 10 Commandments with your new guitar, starting with 'Thou shalt spend inordinate amounts of time, effort and money etc ? Seriously, the search for the Holy Grail is what spurs most guitarists to spend. It's usually a special sound that exists in the guitarist's head and in reality in the fingers of his favourite player. If my wife needs ...


5

It won't cause damage. The main consequence of using electric guitar effects with an acoustic amp is the sound will be different. An amp for an electric guitar actually changes the sound a lot, both the sound of the pedals and of the guitar. An acoustic amp is more meant to be like a mini PA that cleanly reproduces the sound. Distortion pedals might sound ...


5

For Acoustic Guitar You probably can do a reasonable job using a keyboard amp with an acoustic guitar. You may need a pre-amp pedal (or similar) to boost the signal from your guitar in order to use it with a keyboard amp, and you may want to adjust the equalization when switching between guitar and keys, but other than that, acoustic guitars often sound ...


4

What I would suggest is to use an Apogee Jam to plug the guitar into the laptop, where it can then use Amplitube to model the sound of a guitar. Then just play a backing track on the laptop, and listen with headphones. There are some disadvantages to this approach but it has been fairly convenient and produces a reasonably good result. You can also ...


4

Line out would remove the influence of the speaker, an important component of the overall tone. Miking would preserve that, with the downside of potential spill from other sources. A third option would be something like a guitar Pod, many types available these days. That would be capable of giving you speaker emulation at the line outs. The guitarist could ...


4

Electric guitar amps are not intended to faithfully reproduce the sound of the electric guitar, but to shape it and give it a new sound entirely. Alot of people will buy their electric guitar amp on the basis that they feel it gives them the sound they're looking for. As for amplifying acoustic guitar, that's not quite the case because the whole thing about ...


4

My first questions would be 'why rifle mics?' & 'how far away are they?' As Doug said, an SM58 tight in front of one of the cones has been used with reasonable success for decades - play with axis to get the sound as you'd like it. It may not be the ultimate solution, but it really is a working solution. When you say they're under the staging, you ...


4

The traditional solution would be to crank up the master volume to get more power amp overdrive, the only stage common to all channels. So it will of course affect the distortion channels as well, but probably not in a harmful way. However, it of course means you'll be much louder overall1. Really, that Clean channel seems to be meant to have such a sound ...


4

When you get an amplification system there are typically three main components: Preamp, Power Amp, and speakers. The Preamp receives the signal and allows modification to the signal, such as EQ or built in FX. Preamps typically add a 'color' to the sound (basically tone), which is a big part of the deciding factor when purchasing one amp over another. ...


4

No reason. The power amps mainly boost the sound coming from the pre-amps. So they can be swapped. Why you need 350 watts for foldback is a question, unless you're playing 1,000+ venues or out in the open. Why haven't you just tried the idea?


4

A good amp, apart from sounding good, should have a long life before it. So check all the controls: do they make a solid impression? Do the pots move smoothly, nothing is loose, and nothing makes noises it shouldn't? If every change in settings comes with its own sequence of "snap, crackle, pop", then this won't get better over time. How much noise does ...


4

If you really need a power attenuator depends on what you want to achieve. A 22W amp can usually be turned down sufficiently to be played in an apartment. However, if you want it to sound as if it were cranked up, i.e. you want the power amp to saturate, then you'll need a power attenuator. And in this case any attenuator that matches the output impedance of ...


4

This depends on what you are satisfied with. If you are satisfied with the sound that the amp gives you, you don't need to change anything. You can play with that sound. Many people don't like the default sound, so they try to find some other sound. I, personally, think that it won't harm you to try to find some sound you like most. As a ...


4

A valve and a tube are the same thing -- "tube" was originally more common in American English, while "valve" was more common in England. A "vacuum tube" is any one of a number of types of electronic component based around an arrangement of electrodes inside a sealed glass unit, from which all the air has been removed. The kind of tube used in amplification ...



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