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14

Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


8

I haven't found any comments on this question online from someone who actually knows a lot about amplifier design. I also have not been able to find any horror stories such as "I did this once and destroyed my amp/speaker", which I would expect to find if it were actually an issue. I have found many mentions of professional bass players using guitar amps and ...


8

It is possible to mix the signal of two guitars before going in the amp. You can even plug two simultaneously into a single input with a simple Y-adaptor; you can mix the relative loudness with the volume pots (though it will be fiddly). A small mixer gives much better control, but the impedance of the line input on such mixers is usually rather too low for ...


8

As already said, mic-preamp clipping cannot possibly be an issue if you use any amp that's legal to operate without a strategic weapons license, and the sound guys know what they're doing. I would add three possible things to joseem's list, that might be the real issue: The sound guys were using the same channel for different purposes (e.g. before you for ...


7

In a lot of mixes, it's normal and even intentional for the acoustic guitar(s) to get hidden behind the electric guitars and other instruments during the loud parts. If you listen to the Led Zeppelin songs that have both acoustic and electric guitars, it can sound like the acoustic track is muted during the "loud" parts, but it's usually actually sitting ...


7

Hi fidelity reproduction of high frequencies is undesirable in electric guitar amplification. If you look at what actually comes out of a guitar amp, things get really messy around 5 - 6 kHz and then drop off rapidly after that. This is a good thing. If you ever use any kind of amp or pedal distortion designed for guitar and then run it directly into a ...


7

Get better sound guys. Clipping is an electronic phenomenon when the input signal is too hot for the circuitry, so the tops and bottoms of the waveform are getting shaved off. (This is bad because speakers don't like constant voltages at anything other than 0V.) Microphone signals are far below the line level that the mixer is operating on, so the only way ...


7

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


6

Plugging two guitars into a guitar amplifier that is designed for one guitar at a time, can be done - but it's not recommended for reasons suggested in other answers. You can find many guitar amps billed as "two channel" amps, but many of these are still intended to amplify only one guitar at a time. They might have a "clean" channel and a "dirty" ...


6

Clipping in this situation could be caused by: 1) the microphone not being the most appropriate to the task at hand, and not being able to capture your audio without, well, clipping. Positioning the mike further away from the amp could possibly lead to some working solution, but could bring other problems, like capturing other sources or ruining your sound ...


6

It depends on the load requirements of the amplifier and the impedances of the speakers, neither of which you have specified. If the amplifier has a 4 ohm output transformer tap, or it is solid state and well-specified into a 4 ohm load, you can put 2 x 8ohms or 4 x 16ohms in parallel. Similarly if you have 2 x 16ohm speakers you can put them in parallel ...


6

The best way to record an amp like that would be to put a mic in front of it and connect the mic to the interface. The second best way would be to use a speaker simulator/DI that can be inserted in between the speaker out of the amp and the speakers, and then the XLR out from the speaker sim/DI would be connected to the interface. It does not seem to have ...


6

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


6

I'm hesitant to add an answer, but I don't have enough rep to just comment. In any event, no, that doesn't seem "normal". :) Couldn't tell from the video because your fret hand was out if the frame for most for the video - but are your hands coming off (completely) of the strings when you switch chords? If so I'm wondering if there's a grounding problem... ...


5

I also play a Taylor Acoustic (614CE) in a band with electric guitar and electric bass and drums. I also play in an acoustic duo and play at open mics with other musicians with all sorts of instrumentation in the impromptu bands we form, and I play solo acoustic. So I would like to share what I have learned from personal experience. The most important ...


5

It's really quite simple. Your Hi-Fi stereo speakers are designed to produce the full range audio spectrum that might be found in recordings that you would play through your system. This will include the lowest notes of a bass and a kick drum to the high frequency of a cymbal or highest notes of an 88 key keyboard. The frequency bandwidth that an ...


5

The most common way guitarist chain their effects together is in series. This means that the original output source (the guitar) is plugged in to the input of the first effects pedal and the output from that pedal is plugged into the input of the next one and so on. The last pedal's output is plugged in to your amplifier. This is often called an effects "...


4

As long as the speaker's power rating is > 15W (which is the amp's maximum power) you don't need to worry too much. The main question is if it's really worth to replace the built-in speaker, which - I heard - is actually not bad at all. The only problem is its relatively small size, but due to the combo's size it will be hard to replace it with a much bigger ...


4

You will find that a lot of guitarists actually use amp settings that are mostly clean, and get their sounds from their pedals. For instance, Matt Bellamy from Muse uses a lot of effects, including the ZVex Fuzz Factory. He has at least one custom guitar with a Fuzz Factory built into the guitar (he used it for Plug-in Baby). Here are some points to ...


4

Yes, in a way it would indeed be "easier", as long as there is a line output on the amp. The reason for using a microphone when recording an amplified electric guitar is that the speaker is a significant part of the sound, not to mention the room (although to a lesser extent). Even the microphone is part of the sound! (Of course you don't have to use a ...


4

To oversimplify slightly, assume that matched tubes all have the same "bias point". Meaning, if you have unmatched tubes, the bias adjustment that works for one of them might not work very well at all for the rest. If you have matched tubes, they are close enough that one bias point will work for all four. You only have one bias adjustment dial on that amp, ...


4

The best thing, especially if you plan to grow as a musician into the future, is to get a compact mixer. Like this: Image source It will solve the immediate need and give you the ability to combine other sources as needed, such as another keyboard or a portable music player or phone or who knows what. Also, it can be very helpful if and when you start ...


4

it is possible with an adapter from 2 jacks to 1 but since it is 1 channel you may experience one guitar distorting the other. I have tried it but the result was not very pleasing to the ear.


4

A lot of guitar amps have two inputs - often 'high' and 'low'. Either or both can be used, so two guitars will work this way. The obvious problem is that whatever tone and volume the amp is set at, it will be the same for both guitars. Maybe not ideal. A better idea is to use a small mixer (I have a few Behringer mic mixers which do a similar job) to plug ...


4

Most answers are focusing on the question as written, i.e can this be done, and the answer is of course yes, with the right equipment. It is however, not a good idea, because (even if you avoid issues like distortion intermodulation) having the sound of both guitars coming from the same speaker makes it difficult to distinguish who is playing what. This is ...


3

First off, put your ear right up to the speaker on your Pathfinder (while you're not playing!) and make sure it's not coming out of there. I doubt it is, but it's worth it to double check. After that, the most likely explanation (IMHO) is computer power supply noise leaking into the sound card through the ground plane. It's possible that recording on ...


3

As far as I know, it's not a case of being able to tolerate it, it's more if the speakers can't reproduce the sound well. That's why you generally have 15" speakers in a bass cab and 12" speakers in a guitar cab. At the end of the day, an amplifier does just that - amplifies the sound it receives. I imagine you plug an active bass with very hot pickups into ...


3

An effects loop takes the signal from the preamp and does something with it before the power amp. Without this connection port, you can't tap into that place without a soldering iron and sanity. If you're using a drive pedal for distortion, and the amp is set clean, you don't really need an effects loop if you don't want to. The processing can all go ...


3

No, there's nothing wrong with your amp. Only, remember that the tone of any guitar amp is shaped by all of its three main components: The preamp section, including the gain, tone controls and channel selectors (if any). This is usually the only section where you can tweak the sound, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the most important for the final ...


3

Adding to Todd's answer. Another problem that causes death to guitarists is a loose earth wire in the mains plug. Particularly on British type 3-pin plugs (an awful design!). Constant pulling on the flex causes the earth wire to come loose. No problem in itself, relatively. The amp still works. BUT when that earth wire flops about inside the plug, and ...



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