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14

Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


13

There are mainly three factors to this: Powerful speakers need (or at least used to need) heavy magnets. Lightweight cabinets tend to be less “acoustically stable” than heavy ones. And more easily damaged when handled roughly. 50 Hz transformers need a lot of windings around fat iron cores. (Plus, tube amps also need output transformers. And, ...


8

I haven't found any comments on this question online from someone who actually knows a lot about amplifier design. I also have not been able to find any horror stories such as "I did this once and destroyed my amp/speaker", which I would expect to find if it were actually an issue. I have found many mentions of professional bass players using guitar amps and ...


7

Would having the delay after the cab sim ruin it? No Would it sound different if the delay was in the effects loop? It depends. It depends on what kind of delay you are using and how it is changing the audio besides the actual delay portion. The power amp and speaker (or cab sim) in a guitar amp are kinda like an effect, sort of like a fixed EQ and ...


7

In a lot of mixes, it's normal and even intentional for the acoustic guitar(s) to get hidden behind the electric guitars and other instruments during the loud parts. If you listen to the Led Zeppelin songs that have both acoustic and electric guitars, it can sound like the acoustic track is muted during the "loud" parts, but it's usually actually sitting ...


6

It won't cause damage. The main consequence of using electric guitar effects with an acoustic amp is the sound will be different. An amp for an electric guitar actually changes the sound a lot, both the sound of the pedals and of the guitar. An acoustic amp is more meant to be like a mini PA that cleanly reproduces the sound. Distortion pedals might sound ...


5

For Acoustic Guitar You probably can do a reasonable job using a keyboard amp with an acoustic guitar. You may need a pre-amp pedal (or similar) to boost the signal from your guitar in order to use it with a keyboard amp, and you may want to adjust the equalization when switching between guitar and keys, but other than that, acoustic guitars often sound ...


5

I also play a Taylor Acoustic (614CE) in a band with electric guitar and electric bass and drums. I also play in an acoustic duo and play at open mics with other musicians with all sorts of instrumentation in the impromptu bands we form, and I play solo acoustic. So I would like to share what I have learned from personal experience. The most important ...


4

From personal experience as well as working with well respected engineers, guitar amps make noises. A lot of time this has to do with the type of amp and setup that you are going for. Sure, you can get a fairly clean sound out of certain amps/guitars but if you're playing a rock setup, your amp will be making some noise. This is only really an issue if ...


4

A valve and a tube are the same thing -- "tube" was originally more common in American English, while "valve" was more common in England. A "vacuum tube" is any one of a number of types of electronic component based around an arrangement of electrodes inside a sealed glass unit, from which all the air has been removed. The kind of tube used in amplification ...


4

There are two easy formulas for calculating impedance. When your speakers are connected in series, you can simply sum the impedances; Ztotal = Z1+Z2+...+Zn. with Z the impedance. When your speakers are connected in parallel, the equation gets slightly more difficult: Ztotal = 1 / ( 1/Z1 + 1/Z2 + ... + 1/Zn ). For two 8-ohm speakers, this indeed becomes ...


4

Basically, yes. An amp is an essential part of a guitar's sound, tends to be overdriven somewhat (or has circuitry simulating the kind of overdrive a tube amp would show), has a single speaker with rather stiff fastenings and specific sound color covering a range up to something like 8kHz, no tweeters which would give overdrive a rather unpleasant color as ...


4

Absolutely - use a smaller amp and mic it up. Check out pretty much any rock band these days. Sure, some will use the classic Wall of Marshalls (with one or 2 mic'ed up) at big venues, but the majority now use relatively small amps - often between 50 and 150 watts, and have these mic'ed into the PA desk. This makes it very easy to define your on-stage ...


4

As long as the speaker's power rating is > 15W (which is the amp's maximum power) you don't need to worry too much. The main question is if it's really worth to replace the built-in speaker, which - I heard - is actually not bad at all. The only problem is its relatively small size, but due to the combo's size it will be hard to replace it with a much bigger ...


4

You will find that a lot of guitarists actually use amp settings that are mostly clean, and get their sounds from their pedals. For instance, Matt Bellamy from Muse uses a lot of effects, including the ZVex Fuzz Factory. He has at least one custom guitar with a Fuzz Factory built into the guitar (he used it for Plug-in Baby). Here are some points to ...


4

Yes, in a way it would indeed be "easier", as long as there is a line output on the amp. The reason for using a microphone when recording an amplified electric guitar is that the speaker is a significant part of the sound, not to mention the room (although to a lesser extent). Even the microphone is part of the sound! (Of course you don't have to use a ...


3

As Todd stated above he is correct in the use of pedals and amps, and the differences in acoustic amps and regular electric guitar amps. However, you can get away with it, it just may not have the sound you're looking for as Todd stated. But, you can use a Maxon OD 9 overdrive pedal, and it will have more bass response than the old Tube Screamer overdrive ...


3

Guitar amplifiers reproduce sound very well in the range of notes (frequencies) that a guitar plays, but the sound quality is relatively poor outside that range. A keyboard can play a much wider range of notes, so a keyboard amplifier needs to be good at producing a wider range of frequencies. What this means is that a good keyboard amplifier will work ...


3

It does make a difference, but not in the audio quality. In general it is a good idea to leave unused channels at their lowest amplitude setting to prevent accidentally blasting your headphones, speakers, or ears (which can happen in many different ways). In that sense, yes, it is better to turn volume regulators to mute for unused headphone amplifier ...


3

I used to associate quality = mass for most things, including PA systems and (tube-powered) guitar amps. Now that I'm my 50's I've looked for ways to get that sound without so much weight, and thankfully, new neodymium magnets have helped a lot. My current favourite is a Hughes & Kettner Combo 18. At 21 lbs it is easy on my back, but a monster for ...


3

A decent PA would do it, and give you the possibility of plugging in microphones also, or other sound sources. If you are trying to go cheap and compact, then a keyboard amp or electronic drum amp would also work, but those are normally designed for a single sound source. You'll want a lot more watts in your PA or keyboard/drum amp than your guitar amp, ...


3

First off, put your ear right up to the speaker on your Pathfinder (while you're not playing!) and make sure it's not coming out of there. I doubt it is, but it's worth it to double check. After that, the most likely explanation (IMHO) is computer power supply noise leaking into the sound card through the ground plane. It's possible that recording on ...


3

As far as I know, it's not a case of being able to tolerate it, it's more if the speakers can't reproduce the sound well. That's why you generally have 15" speakers in a bass cab and 12" speakers in a guitar cab. At the end of the day, an amplifier does just that - amplifies the sound it receives. I imagine you plug an active bass with very hot pickups into ...


3

An effects loop takes the signal from the preamp and does something with it before the power amp. Without this connection port, you can't tap into that place without a soldering iron and sanity. If you're using a drive pedal for distortion, and the amp is set clean, you don't really need an effects loop if you don't want to. The processing can all go ...


3

No, there's nothing wrong with your amp. Only, remember that the tone of any guitar amp is shaped by all of its three main components: The preamp section, including the gain, tone controls and channel selectors (if any). This is usually the only section where you can tweak the sound, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the most important for the final ...


3

Adding to Todd's answer. Another problem that causes death to guitarists is a loose earth wire in the mains plug. Particularly on British type 3-pin plugs (an awful design!). Constant pulling on the flex causes the earth wire to come loose. No problem in itself, relatively. The amp still works. BUT when that earth wire flops about inside the plug, and ...


3

While your amp is in repair, get your house wiring checked. A working three-wire installation with a leak-current circuit breaker (which cuts the lines if the amount of current between the two live wires does not add up perfectly) will likely cut the power before you are getting fried. It's not a full guarantee against heart failure but will stop you from ...


2

A tube power amplifier (like the final stage in your Mark V) has to have an output transformer to lower the output impedance (the "Ohms") to a level appropriate to drive a speaker. What does that mean? Well if you know what voltage and current and power are, then one way to look at impedance is how much of the power you are putting out is in voltage and how ...


2

I would use an electric guitar amp for the electric, because it won't sound right otherwise. Then I would get a pickup for the classical guitar and a two channel keyboard amp or keyboard amp and a small mixer or a small mixer and a powered speaker for both the keyboard and classical guitar.


2

It sounds like you have done the simple checks, and if you get a hum from touching the jack that rules out cable and amp (aside from a couple of exceptional faults.) Do as Todd suggests, and try turning the knobs full range while the cable is plugged in and seeing if strumming generates any sounds from the amp. Also check to see if any of the pots are ...



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