Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

How to measure loudness Sound pressure level (SPL) is used to measure loudness in this case. The unit of measurement is dB(SPL). Sound pressure meter is an instrument used to measure dB(SPL). Cheap sound pressure meters can be bought starting at 20 USD. The decibel (dB) is a logarithmic unit used to express the ratio between two values of a physical ...


4

If you really need a power attenuator depends on what you want to achieve. A 22W amp can usually be turned down sufficiently to be played in an apartment. However, if you want it to sound as if it were cranked up, i.e. you want the power amp to saturate, then you'll need a power attenuator. And in this case any attenuator that matches the output impedance of ...


2

Before you go out and buy an attenuator, ensure you really need one. @Matt's answer makes very important observations. Typically attenuators have variable attenuation level; you should be able to get the volume you really want without problems. (Yes, this is the big knob). Weber MiniMASS The only real caveat is maximum power dissipation; they are ...


1

16 ohm speakers are unlikely to be a problem. The term "safe mismatch" is really a misnomer. Amplifiers are not "matched" to the speakers. The amplifier output impedance is normally very low. But the amplifier has voltage, current and power limits that should not be exceeded. Additionally, valve amplifiers don't like very high impedance loads as stray ...


0

I remember reading that the magic ratio was three times, so a five watt tube amp would compare to a fifteen watt solid state. But like everyone else is pointing out, this is a perceived comparison, not real. There are many other factors involved. From experience I can tell you that I perceive this difference and appreciate it, but when you are playing with a ...


0

A 2x12 cab will be moving twice as much air as a 1x12 cab. A 4x12 cab will move 4 times as much ! The more speakers, the better the sound, generally. Not necessarily louder, but that will depend on impedance match. Be careful that the polarity of a pair of speakers is correct. If they're out of phase, they will to a degree cancel each other soundwise. As in ...


0

Antero's answer has the wiring/impedance aspect well covered, so I'll leave that aloneā€¦ but tonally, what you introduce in a 4x12 or even 2x12 over the single 12 equivalent is phase-cancellation; which can emphasise or reduce frequencies in a comb-filter pattern. Not that this is bad, in a guitar rig - it's actually a significant part of the characteristic ...


1

Personally, I would never trust a "Safe Mismatch"... Obviously, systems are protected against those who don't care and don't understand impedances, but even though they say it is safe, it will reduce the life span of the amplifier. Tube amplifiers are more fragile to these changes mostly because the tubes heat a lot already when working like they're ...


1

It's all about headroom 2x12 will get you a lot more headroom, 4x12 even more. It's not about volume, if you have a 1x12 that is 100W and a 2x12 that totals 100W, for the same settings in the amp, you will have the same volume, but in reality the 2x12 will seem louder and the sound will be a lot less muddy with way less tweaking of the EQ. That's what we ...


2

If they're 2x8 Ohm in series, then yes that would give 16 - but guessing is no good. 3 ways to find out, check the maker's plate on the back, get a multimeter & test it, or take the back off & look. For an annoyingly under-technical explanation, read on... The reason 16 is 'safe' is that amps have a tolerance; 8 - 16 is pretty standard. Some can ...


1

Realizing that my guitar was a mid-range instrument helped me find what I believed to be the most satisfying tones i.e. not chasing extreme treble or bass. I have found distortion is good for tightening up the sound a little bit, and higher distortion tends to work better for single note passages and diads than it does for chord work. In general terms ...


4

A good amp, apart from sounding good, should have a long life before it. So check all the controls: do they make a solid impression? Do the pots move smoothly, nothing is loose, and nothing makes noises it shouldn't? If every change in settings comes with its own sequence of "snap, crackle, pop", then this won't get better over time. How much noise does ...


2

Disclaimer: I'm one of those folks who always preferred multiple independent components over an integrated system for audio work. That said, I would go with stomp boxes and separate preamps for practically all tone control, and look for a power-amp&speaker box which is as close to the "wire with gain" paradigm as possible. Which means an amp that is ...


4

One other thing that took me MANY years to realize. The best EQ and tone settings to please your ear in a room by yourself are going to be surprisingly different from the ideal tone when you play with other instruments, and especially when recording. For example, the best guitar sound when a keyboard / synth is playing chords is often much more treble than ...



Top 50 recent answers are included