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Partly the reason people do it is because it used to be the only way. However a mic'd up amp sounds SO good recorded, particularly if you stick a couple mics on there and really catch the sweet spots. Thirdly, the same guitar, played by the same player can sound massively different through different amps. So the reason why you mic up an amp is because THAT ...


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If you are talking bass guitar only, I'd say that would work fine. An audio interface has outputs for both headphones and your computer (USB for example). So you can record and/or hear yourself play. For guitar (and possibly bass) you'll most likely want some effects (amp simulation, distortion, reverb, ...). In that case you'll either need to put a pedal ...


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A vocal microphone is actually 2 parts: microphone preamp You can think of the preamp like a 1-channel mixer. So if you are buying a brand new SM58 ($99) then also buy a small microphone preamp ($40) for it, like this one: ART Tube Mic Pre If that blows your budget, buy the mic preamp and then buy a $59 microphone instead of the SM58. That will give ...


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If you want to connect a Shure dynamic mic (does not need phantom power) such as an SM58, SM57, Beta 58, PG58 etc. All you really need to make it work is the correct cable to plug into your 1/4 inch jack and mic. The cable you need has an XLR female plug on one end and a 1/4 inch TS plug on the other end. See picture below. Comes in various lengths. ...


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"Shure" alone does not tell a lot. If it needs phantom power (like condenser mics do), it won't work on your amp. Also you have to realize that a guitar amp is not general-purpose but intended to make a guitar sound good. In the line of instrument amps, keyboard amps are likely the best candidates for misappropriation by singers as they are more catered ...


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I once did that in a rehearsal session with a band I applied for. It was even an old bass amp. It did work and didn't seem to damage the amp, but don't expect anything that's close to a good sound. Speakers of Guitar or Bass amps are not build for such sounds, so it propably will be dull and bassy. Such an adapter for the cable you can get everywhere. My ...


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The Canon or XLR plug that's probably on the Shure mic tells it's a low impedance mic. If it has a jack plug, it'll be high impedance, and will work better with your guitar amp. You can buy adaptors which plug between mic lead and guitar amp that will match up the differing impedances, matching mic and amp. So, you need a matching impedance adaptor, female ...


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Many bass amps have a DI output (XLR jack), which, unlike a line out, is actually intended for routing into a live mixing console. For bass amps which don't have this, it's actually often best to use an external DI, entirely before the amp. You also lose preamp sound shaping then, but whether the Pathfinder actually does anything useful to the sound there... ...


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While your amp is in repair, get your house wiring checked. A working three-wire installation with a leak-current circuit breaker (which cuts the lines if the amount of current between the two live wires does not add up perfectly) will likely cut the power before you are getting fried. It's not a full guarantee against heart failure but will stop you from ...


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Adding to Todd's answer. Another problem that causes death to guitarists is a loose earth wire in the mains plug. Particularly on British type 3-pin plugs (an awful design!). Constant pulling on the flex causes the earth wire to come loose. No problem in itself, relatively. The amp still works. BUT when that earth wire flops about inside the plug, and ...


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Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


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I've been using Line 6 since the day they came out. I didn't want to admit it when I figured it out, but the circuit it's self inside the line 6 can cause a buzz or humm... The only way to fix mine was to set up the rig without my POD HD Rack Mount. Then the noise was gone. It was a bummer to realize this cause I had to spend a lot more money to gain the ...


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Some USB interfaces that do provide phantom power (like this) cost not much more than your phantom power source. I think the overall quality may be better than using just a phantom power source and the built-in audio interface of your computer. If it is not a computer where you want to plug in your mic, check if it does not provide phantom power on its own. ...


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These two things traditionally don't achieve the same goals; but most audio interfaces allow you to use phantom power (usually with a wall-wart adapter). One is for powering a microphone (for use live, radio, anytime a microphone is needed, etc.) and the other is for recording input from a microphone. If you get a USB audio interface you'll kill a few ...


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You are pretty certain to outgrow a 1 channel power supply since most stuff you want to plug a condenser mic into with convincing results can power it anyway. So it's more of a stopgap device. Of course, with a USB (or other) interface you also put down a wad of money for a particular quality you are then tied into. My own approach would be to get a good ...


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No, there's nothing wrong with your amp. Only, remember that the tone of any guitar amp is shaped by all of its three main components: The preamp section, including the gain, tone controls and channel selectors (if any). This is usually the only section where you can tweak the sound, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the most important for the final ...



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