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1

In Europe where there is no fixed assignment for "neutral" and "live" in most outlets used, it might help to reverse the orientation of the plug by 180degree. In many musical equipments audio signal ground is connected to the ground wire of a grounded outlet, which is further down in your house connected to the "neutral" wire of your outlet. The direct ...


8

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


0

Yes, you can do it with a passive Y-splitter. If there is an increased hum / ground loop problem you can use a direct box for one of them. Plug the guitar into the the DI input, connect amp A to DI through and amp B to DI output, for example. However, there is no guarantee the either amp will sound the same as it does on its own, because the input impedance ...


2

When you get an amplification system there are typically three main components: Preamp, Power Amp, and speakers. The Preamp receives the signal and allows modification to the signal, such as EQ or built in FX. Preamps typically add a 'color' to the sound (basically tone), which is a big part of the deciding factor when purchasing one amp over another. ...


3

The pedal you have (Digitech RP-90) includes amp and cab modelling, so one option would be to ignore the amp's preamp entirely, and run: Guitar > RP-90 > FX Return > Power Amp This is the setup suggested by the unit's manual: Unfortunately, this means that the complex, multichannel preamp section of your amp ends up not contributing at all - just ...


0

First, I'm assuming that your gain isn't cranked while your volume is up. Second, connections can be bad. I'd first try turning knobs (normally volume or gain) and seeing how that affects the crustiness. If it goes away, you probably have a dirty contact in the know and you can try cleaning or replacing it, or (if you're lazy as I am) turning it a bunch ...


0

Yes, but it's good practice to keep both amps on the same electrical circuit (try using the same outlet for both) to avoid hum or even electrocution (usually mild, but dangerous on a wet floor).


1

Let me give you the physicist-who-plays-a-bit-of-guitar answer: "yes and no. it depends". Here is why: A guitar can have different kinds of pickups, but these have in common that the power in the signal they (the pickups) produce is quite small. Now electrically, power is voltage times current. Some "high impedance" pickups produce a high voltage and ...


0

Before spending $350 a THD hotplate per Lucas answer, which is basically just a high-powered volume control (variable resistor) between the amp and speaker, I would do the following: Buy a high powered fixed resistor from an electronics components store, of a resistance (ohms) about 2-4 times the impedance (ohms) of the speaker. Install the resistor in ...


6

I don't think it will work with just a split cable. One complication is ground loops, which cause hum. I'd recommend to use a stereo pedal, or a dedicated AB/Y pedal. You might still get hum, but there are some remedies, like rotating the power plug 180 degrees and plug it in again for one of the amps, using an AB/Y pedal with ground lift, having isolated ...


1

Yes it is possible. I don't really know if the cable you are referring to will work (I don't see why not) but, what I have seen is people using pedals to do this. There are some pedals that have 2 exits that are the same. So, you can use that pedal to plug your guitar into two different amps. This is what El Ten Eleven do. They use a pedal like that (I ...


2

There may be a 'perfect' solution using a nice little sub-mixer, but frankly, yes, it can be done... & has been done many times over the years. Relative volumes may depend on the impedance of the inputs on each amp, but the overall sound is up to you to balance up until you like it. Edit - perhaps very pertinent right now, the new band Royal Blood ...


5

Depending on the multi effect pedal you have, you can do both. But for the simple case, if you are using distortion from the multi effect, use it connected to your guitar. If you're using only e.g. delay or reverb use it in the loop. If you're using distortion in the amp, it usually sounds better if delay is applied on the overdriven signal, and not on the ...



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