New answers tagged

5

I'm hesitant to add an answer, but I don't have enough rep to just comment. In any event, no, that doesn't seem "normal". :) Couldn't tell from the video because your fret hand was out if the frame for most for the video - but are your hands coming off (completely) of the strings when you switch chords? If so I'm wondering if there's a grounding problem... ...


0

For me it was all about the tone. The over drive, distortion had more or less clarity depending on the amps used in conjunction with certain pedals. Each set-up is determined by the guitarist ear, what he/she prefers. I, coming from 90s metal in SD and LA would use a TS9 tubescreamer (the older models) to add a certain tone to the crunch as it were, shaping ...


0

While there is no 100% answer here, the common advice I see is to use an overdrive to compress and boost the signal so that the pre-amp stage of the amp can more effectively distort the signal. In this configuration you would dial the Drive setting of a TubeScreamer (for example) to near zero, Tone at whatever you want, and the Level to a very high setting. ...


6

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


7

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


2

Distortion comes from the circuit 'clipping' the signal, changing the shape of the waveform and adding extra harmonic content to the signal. It's often preferred to go through multiple stages of gentler clipping, so that each stage 'rounds off' the signal a little more, as this allows the player to control the amount of distortion in a more graduated and ...


3

With a 2i4 you have the option of using two inputs so I would suggest tracking either two microphones (for instance an SM57 on the cone, and something sweet like an Aston Spirit or another LDC of your choice on room mic, a couple of foot back to try and get the developed sound of the room.) This should give you the option of developing a nice balanced tone ...


6

The best way to record an amp like that would be to put a mic in front of it and connect the mic to the interface. The second best way would be to use a speaker simulator/DI that can be inserted in between the speaker out of the amp and the speakers, and then the XLR out from the speaker sim/DI would be connected to the interface. It does not seem to have ...


-3

Actually, if your amplifier is a class A amplifier, the tubes are dissipating power all the time (DC power), and when you play music, the power dissipated by the tubes is reduced given that current and voltage go in opposite phases. The amount of power consumption reduced in the tubes is equal to the power consumed by the load. So, the harder you play the ...


0

There are guitar and bass guitar amps that feature multiple frequency dedicated speakers, and even multiple amplifiers. These ones are usually aiming for higher fidelity, as for amplification of acoustic instruments, jazz guitars and the like. As a bass player, I've tried and disliked some of these amps that featured high frequency horns because they tend ...


-1

Do not wire different speakers in series. The sound output of a speaker is specified with respect to its driving voltage, and speakers' impendance tends to vary wildly over its frequency range. The only thing you know is that it will not undercut its nominal impedance by more than 20%. The amplifier is called "Valve King". Why? Valve power amplifiers ...


2

A Peavey ValveKing 20MH amp has a speaker output impedance switch which allows selection of either 16Ω or 8Ω speaker/cabinet impedances with 8Ω max on the 20MH. If you are considering wiring more than two speakers to the amplifier, you need to concern yourself with your amplifier’s ability to handle low impedance loads. If you ignore the way you wire them ...


6

It depends on the load requirements of the amplifier and the impedances of the speakers, neither of which you have specified. If the amplifier has a 4 ohm output transformer tap, or it is solid state and well-specified into a 4 ohm load, you can put 2 x 8ohms or 4 x 16ohms in parallel. Similarly if you have 2 x 16ohm speakers you can put them in parallel ...


2

If your board has VU meters (input level meters), that would be a great way to determine if the mic is clipping your signal. If there is audible clipping before your meter indicates your signal is in the red or reaching 0dB then you know your mic is the problem, or the signal before the mic (which seems unlikely unless your amp is actually acting up). If the ...


2

Two options not mentioned so far are: Run another amp and cab offstage and mic that one. This does require a signal splitter, so you can get the tone you want on stage, while doing something different offstage. This doubles the kit, so can double your costs, as well as requiring somewhere to mic up that other amp... Use an attenuator (often called Power ...


8

As already said, mic-preamp clipping cannot possibly be an issue if you use any amp that's legal to operate without a strategic weapons license, and the sound guys know what they're doing. I would add three possible things to joseem's list, that might be the real issue: The sound guys were using the same channel for different purposes (e.g. before you for ...


6

Clipping in this situation could be caused by: 1) the microphone not being the most appropriate to the task at hand, and not being able to capture your audio without, well, clipping. Positioning the mike further away from the amp could possibly lead to some working solution, but could bring other problems, like capturing other sources or ruining your sound ...


7

Get better sound guys. Clipping is an electronic phenomenon when the input signal is too hot for the circuitry, so the tops and bottoms of the waveform are getting shaved off. (This is bad because speakers don't like constant voltages at anything other than 0V.) Microphone signals are far below the line level that the mixer is operating on, so the only way ...


2

This is just the way all classic tube amp designs pushing 12" cones sound. Close backed cabinets are even more directional than open backed cabinets with the same drivers. I play live with a 1x12 combo and I deliberately point it right at my head and make it sound a little too bright and harsh. That way I can always hear my amp over the rest of the band and ...


1

There are several possible causes: As a general rule, the sound produced by a loudspeaker is more directionally "focused" at high frequencies. If the speaker is aimed directly at the opposite wall of a room, you are likely to get "organ pipe" resonances because of sound reflecting directly from the wall back onto the speaker. In this case, there may be ...


1

One thing you need to realize is that the keyboard speakers are designed to make you heard, to project whereas monitor speakers are designed to not make your monitoring output heard in direction of the audience. So going through the keyboard amp will likely easier result in interference with the sound from the PA for the audience, and will more likely lead ...


3

Yes, you can do this. The KC-550 amp is kind of designed to be the center of attention for the keyboardist -- you could actually use it AS your DI and monitor simultaneously, but then you wouldn't be able to monitor the rest of the mix. According to the owner's manual for the KC-550, the XLR input for channel 1 is the only balanced input on the amp, which ...



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