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1

Heads are the amplifiers, the actual part of the signal chain that increases the power of a signal. Speakers convert that power to moving some physical apparatus (e.g. sheet of paper) that vibrates the air, making sound. So like Bob said, people don't put heads on top of amps, but rather speakers. The amp itself doesn't make sound. In fact, if you're using ...


5

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


8

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


2

If your amp has a "line out" or headphones jack, then you should be able to connect that to the audio interface. Note that usually this means that the output is low impedendence, and the amount of pre amp gain that you'll need is lower than you'd need for plugging the guitar straight in (the amplifier is providing some initial amplification). The same ...


4

If the output jack is labeled line out it means it can be plugged into any line-level input, as those found in audio interfaces, so you should be safe. If your interface is "pro" grade, it can have Mic inputs and "Hi-Z" (or Instrument) inputs too, so check if it's the case and make sure you plug into the line inputs. Also, keep in mind that unless the ...


2

Acoustic shielding is difficult. The effectiveness of any shield is a function of the ratio of it's size to the wavelength. That means that shields are good at controlling high frequencies (= small wavelengths) but do almost nothing at low frequencies. Wavelength at 100 Hz is 3.40m. So a shield can eliminate high frequency pick up but you still end up with ...


4

My first questions would be 'why rifle mics?' & 'how far away are they?' As Doug said, an SM58 tight in front of one of the cones has been used with reasonable success for decades - play with axis to get the sound as you'd like it. It may not be the ultimate solution, but it really is a working solution. When you say they're under the staging, you ...


5

Are the mikes on the amps feeding a PA which feeds the audience ears, or are the amps making the sound for the audience themselves ? If they're going through a PA one way is to turn the volume of the amps down a bit (so they don't saturate the room & bleed onto each other), face them away from each other or use acoustic shields to isolate them (or just ...


1

The effects loop on a guitar amplifier is between the preamp (where the gain and EQ controls sit to modify the tone) and the power amplifier (which pretty much just makes everything louder). Your specific amplifier has a multi-channel tube preamp with a solid state power amp. As your amplifier has an effects loop, you can feed a non-guitar input in through ...


6

The biggest advantage for line out is that you don't have to worry about feedback, and that you can model the tone without worrying about positioning, angles, mics, bleeding, etc; which is a disadvantage of the mic-amp combo, you need to worry about a lot of things to be able to do it correctly. If you love the sound that comes out of the speakers of the ...


4

Line out would remove the influence of the speaker, an important component of the overall tone. Miking would preserve that, with the downside of potential spill from other sources. A third option would be something like a guitar Pod, many types available these days. That would be capable of giving you speaker emulation at the line outs. The guitarist could ...


0

I once had to leave my GK MB150S amp outside in the cold for about 1 hr before being able to even get into a packed crowd in a very warm, humid room to do a gig. Amp failed- light on but no sound, and I had to put my bass through the PA, got through the gig on a wing and a prayer. However, the following day at home I switched on amp, plugged in bass ...


4

Electric guitar amps are not intended to faithfully reproduce the sound of the electric guitar, but to shape it and give it a new sound entirely. Alot of people will buy their electric guitar amp on the basis that they feel it gives them the sound they're looking for. As for amplifying acoustic guitar, that's not quite the case because the whole thing about ...


1

Yes, it's okay, no big difference. Actually, you only need pre-amp, equalizer, and a reverb. But, if you're playing in a big gig show, soundhole cover is needed to avoid the feedback, but in some case that your acoustic guitar already have notch filter or feedback reducer, it's fine not to attach soundhole cover. I always play my acoustic through electric ...


2

There are in fact acoustic guitar amps out there that you can buy for this purpose. If you have the money to spend on it, I would definitely recommend that. Other than that, regular amps are okay for acoustic guitar, although you'll find that the sound is not ideal this way. Additionally, acoustic guitar amps use notch filters to prevent feedback, which is ...


1

Everyone so far has offered software solutions but as I read it you want to practice using your amp and effects pedals rather than substitute with an software based amp sim so I would suggest getting a cab emulator such as the Two Notes Torpedo CAB and run a line out from your amp bypassing the amps internal speaker, use the cab simulator to emulate your own ...


1

As the other answers show, there are various ways of combining multiple devices to meet your needs. However, Tascam have a line of great stand alone devices for your purpose. I have the CD GT2 and have found it indispensable, it is without a doubt the best music related purchase I've ever made in terms of improving my skill level. ...


1

There are quite a lot of products available which take guitar signal and an aux signal, and combine them into a headphone. Here's some photos of some - one cheap, the other more upmarket. I googled "pocket practice amp aux". With these one, you would plug the large input jack into your guitar. You would connect an MP3 player (or whatever) into the 3.5mm ...


3

If you have a "line-in" input on your laptop, I have three suggestions: The quick and dirty one is to get a cheap adapter jack, connect your guitar to your laptop through the line-in input and use one of the zillions of free or commercial amp simulators on your computer. Unfortunately this will not give you good tone, because the guitar output is not ...


4

What I would suggest is to use an Apogee Jam to plug the guitar into the laptop, where it can then use Amplitube to model the sound of a guitar. Then just play a backing track on the laptop, and listen with headphones. There are some disadvantages to this approach but it has been fairly convenient and produces a reasonably good result. You can also ...


1

A point to point wired amp will generally have a rectifier, a nice big transformer, simple but high quality components, and be connected to a decent speaker; anyone with a PTP amp probably has a decent sounding axe. This will sound better. Rectifiers have nice natural compression. Seems a lot of people haven't heard old amps much. There's a reason they're ...


1

Bad for electric guitar sound. The horn will cause horrible high-pitched feedback. Use a guitar or bass cab. Fine for acoustic guitar, but then, why not just use monitors? Fine for upright bass reinforcement. Not good for electric rock bass, you won't get character sound. The clean sound of the horn is nice for jazz bass.


4

Speaker damage is caused by either the cone moving too much, or the voice coil overheating from distortion. Most sounds from modern amps will not cause either, regardless of the instrument you connect. There is nothing that says you cannot plug a synth or a guitar into a bass amp, or a bass or synth into a guitar amp. If it sounds good, you can use it. ...


12

No, it will not damage the speaker. The high tones of a guitar are simply not capable of damaging your bass amp. Even if the amp isn't really suitable for these high tones (and in many cases, they can actually play them just fine), the amp will perfectly survive them. No harm there. The other way around is a much worse idea, because deep bass tones tend to ...


0

My best guess says you have earthing problems. Try using a different power socket!


1

It's rather simple. Reduce the Volume knob on your guitar which is meant for your pickup to a limit wher you cannot hear sliding sounds. Then recompensate turning your amplifier gain a bit harder



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