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1

First I would say try a more rounded pick and see if it helps you achieve the sound you want. I personally never got used to the pointy edge of a jazz III. For a thick rounder pick I'd recommend tortex .88 It might help, and if it doesn't you only spend 50 cents!. Secondly, the absolutely hands down best way to improve the "sound production" aspect of ...


0

I play classical as well, so I shape and sand my fingernails to a glass like finish with 12000 grit sand paper, and they sound really nice, now I have the above mentioned problem and I polish my picks the same way I do my nails and it helps allot. I agree with not using very much pick at all and working on the angle you attack the string. I used to use very ...


7

Would having the delay after the cab sim ruin it? No Would it sound different if the delay was in the effects loop? It depends. It depends on what kind of delay you are using and how it is changing the audio besides the actual delay portion. The power amp and speaker (or cab sim) in a guitar amp are kinda like an effect, sort of like a fixed EQ and ...


-3

You can put a delay almost anywhere in the effects chain without difference. The one thing where it makes a difference is with time-dependent effects. You will not notice much of a difference with automatically running time-dependent effects like a Wah-Wah. But of course you'll notice with any "effect" involving yourself: a volume pedal or other control, ...


1

What makes even a relatively small amp (like a 50W $2000 Mesa) so heavy (~25kg) and how is this linked to quality? Those amps use cast frame speakers, specifically an OEM variant of the Electro-Voice EV12L, which is probably the second loudest and second heaviest guitar speaker in the history of time (the JBL F120 is a bit louder and heavier). Heavy ...


0

I had the same question and I solved it with a M-Audio M-Track interface. Here is a review here: http://www.audioadapter.net/usb/maudio-mtrack I'm playing a regular Fender Strat. The strat plugs into the M-Track and the M-track has a USB plug that goes into the computer. I have a Mac PowerBook running Garage Band but the unit comes with a software ...


-4

There is a simple answer: Go to WalMart, or Target, or Radio Shack (or any other electronic store). Buy the following if you do not already own them: Headphones - preferrably the kind that cover your entire ear. Stay away from those damn earbud things. You can find a functionable set for $10 or under. A "Y" splitter cable. This is simply a normal ...


3

I used to associate quality = mass for most things, including PA systems and (tube-powered) guitar amps. Now that I'm my 50's I've looked for ways to get that sound without so much weight, and thankfully, new neodymium magnets have helped a lot. My current favourite is a Hughes & Kettner Combo 18. At 21 lbs it is easy on my back, but a monster for ...


12

There are mainly three factors to this: Powerful speakers need (or at least used to need) heavy magnets. Lightweight cabinets tend to be less “acoustically stable” than heavy ones. And more easily damaged when handled roughly. 50 Hz transformers need a lot of windings around fat iron cores. (Plus, tube amps also need output transformers. And, ...


1

Keyboard amps and Electronic Drum Amps will work fine for bass. They both produce frequencies in the same range that a bass does. I'll leave the discussion of guitar amps and hifi's to what has already been contributed.


4

There are two easy formulas for calculating impedance. When your speakers are connected in series, you can simply sum the impedances; Ztotal = Z1+Z2+...+Zn. with Z the impedance. When your speakers are connected in parallel, the equation gets slightly more difficult: Ztotal = 1 / ( 1/Z1 + 1/Z2 + ... + 1/Zn ). For two 8-ohm speakers, this indeed becomes ...


0

As long as the speakers are connected in parallel, which I'm assuming they are being that they are in separate enclosures, than yes, two 8 ohm speakers in parallel will equal 4 ohms. Here is a more in depth discussion http://www.prestonelectronics.com/audio/Impedance.htm


3

It does make a difference, but not in the audio quality. In general it is a good idea to leave unused channels at their lowest amplitude setting to prevent accidentally blasting your headphones, speakers, or ears (which can happen in many different ways). In that sense, yes, it is better to turn volume regulators to mute for unused headphone amplifier ...


0

The pots attenuate the signal. If there's nothing to receive that signal, it matters not. Like why signal you're turning right/left in a car when there's no-one to pick up the signal.


1

You can but the sound will not be quite the same as if you record the sound of the amp with a microphone, you are loosing all the amp characteristics like, the sound of the cabinet, the extrusion of the speaker and even perhaps the feedback it gives to the guitar (like when you put your guitar close to the amp to cause an intentional feedback loop), but you ...



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