New answers tagged

2

If your board has VU meters (input level meters), that would be a great way to determine if the mic is clipping your signal. If there is audible clipping before your meter indicates your signal is in the red or reaching 0dB then you know your mic is the problem, or the signal before the mic (which seems unlikely unless your amp is actually acting up). If the ...


2

Two options not mentioned so far are: Run another amp and cab offstage and mic that one. This does require a signal splitter, so you can get the tone you want on stage, while doing something different offstage. This doubles the kit, so can double your costs, as well as requiring somewhere to mic up that other amp... Use an attenuator (often called Power ...


7

As already said, mic-preamp clipping cannot possibly be an issue if you use any amp that's legal to operate without a strategic weapons license, and the sound guys know what they're doing. I would add three possible things to joseem's list, that might be the real issue: The sound guys were using the same channel for different purposes (e.g. before you for ...


5

Clipping in this situation could be caused by: 1) the microphone not being the most appropriate to the task at hand, and not being able to capture your audio without, well, clipping. Positioning the mike further away from the amp could possibly lead to some working solution, but could bring other problems, like capturing other sources or ruining your sound ...


6

Get better sound guys. Clipping is an electronic phenomenon when the input signal is too hot for the circuitry, so the tops and bottoms of the waveform are getting shaved off. (This is bad because speakers don't like constant voltages at anything other than 0V.) Microphone signals are far below the line level that the mixer is operating on, so the only way ...


2

This is just the way all classic tube amp designs pushing 12" cones sound. Close backed cabinets are even more directional than open backed cabinets with the same drivers. I play live with a 1x12 combo and I deliberately point it right at my head and make it sound a little too bright and harsh. That way I can always hear my amp over the rest of the band and ...


1

There are several possible causes: As a general rule, the sound produced by a loudspeaker is more directionally "focused" at high frequencies. If the speaker is aimed directly at the opposite wall of a room, you are likely to get "organ pipe" resonances because of sound reflecting directly from the wall back onto the speaker. In this case, there may be ...


1

One thing you need to realize is that the keyboard speakers are designed to make you heard, to project whereas monitor speakers are designed to not make your monitoring output heard in direction of the audience. So going through the keyboard amp will likely easier result in interference with the sound from the PA for the audience, and will more likely lead ...


3

Yes, you can do this. The KC-550 amp is kind of designed to be the center of attention for the keyboardist -- you could actually use it AS your DI and monitor simultaneously, but then you wouldn't be able to monitor the rest of the mix. According to the owner's manual for the KC-550, the XLR input for channel 1 is the only balanced input on the amp, which ...


4

Most answers are focusing on the question as written, i.e can this be done, and the answer is of course yes, with the right equipment. It is however, not a good idea, because (even if you avoid issues like distortion intermodulation) having the sound of both guitars coming from the same speaker makes it difficult to distinguish who is playing what. This is ...


1

If one needs to have two or more guitarists playing for a group, it may be helpful to have guitar feed a dedicated monitor speaker, but have most of the sound come from a PA amplifier which is fed both. For many musicians, however, it will be important to have at least some of the sound for each guitar coming from a speaker which is dedicated to that ...


6

Plugging two guitars into a guitar amplifier that is designed for one guitar at a time, can be done - but it's not recommended for reasons suggested in other answers. You can find many guitar amps billed as "two channel" amps, but many of these are still intended to amplify only one guitar at a time. They might have a "clean" channel and a "dirty" ...


8

It is possible to mix the signal of two guitars before going in the amp. You can even plug two simultaneously into a single input with a simple Y-adaptor; you can mix the relative loudness with the volume pots (though it will be fiddly). A small mixer gives much better control, but the impedance of the line input on such mixers is usually rather too low for ...


3

Tim's mixer suggestion is probably the best way to get started with minimum outlay. A two channel amp might be another option. I use an old Fender Princeton Chorus, which is a smallish 50W 2x10 solid state combo. The clean tones and stereo chorus are really nice, but of relevance here is the fact that you can plug in two guitars and effectively you have two ...


4

A lot of guitar amps have two inputs - often 'high' and 'low'. Either or both can be used, so two guitars will work this way. The obvious problem is that whatever tone and volume the amp is set at, it will be the same for both guitars. Maybe not ideal. A better idea is to use a small mixer (I have a few Behringer mic mixers which do a similar job) to plug ...


4

it is possible with an adapter from 2 jacks to 1 but since it is 1 channel you may experience one guitar distorting the other. I have tried it but the result was not very pleasing to the ear.


0

With today's amp modeler you don't really need a Guitar amp. Using a guitar amplifier will just color the tone from your amp modeler. PA is way better. If you are going to use an AMP modeler DON'T BUY a GUITAR AMP.


1

There is not really a pro or con you could define here, at least not for sound. Amp Heads and box are more common it seems, but it really depends on your requirements and what you like. A head+cab combination is a bit more comfortable compared to a combo, a combo is propably easier to transport, compared to a 4x12 box+head. With seperate preamp and power ...


1

I was worried about this same problem. i had a small 10 watt Marshall Mg that I played with a les paul. It was good for quiet practice in my basement but i wanted bigger sound. However i didn't have big money to go spend on a tube amp or anything. What i did have was a Fender Acoustasonic 30watt amp. Even with an electric guitar plugged in it have a great ...


0

few things you can try here, a noise supressor pedal can help eliminate the pick noise but too much can cause you to lose sustain. also see if you can lower your pickups a little and use more volume and eq from your amp to get the tone you need and may lose. most of the time you don't lose enough to notice unless you bottom out the pickups. a pickup too ...


1

I have been playing through not only a p/a speaker, but using a full stereo p/a amplifier. This is because I have been fully converted to Modelling technologies. Up until recently I was using a VOX Tonelab LE, and it finally took a crap so I picked up an HD500. I have better sound than anybody on an standard amp, and it's versatile as hell. I can go clean ...


-2

Just buy another amp m80. Look around hard enough and you can find em cheaper than dirt. And you won't have to sacrifice tone



Top 50 recent answers are included