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32

This is not always true. While most bar bands have this set up, if you go to many large concerts (for instance the Eagles concert tour), you will often find many percussionists working simultaneously. But on average, and for most typical bands, I'd say you're correct. And while I can't give a scientific reason, I can give my general opinions and at no ...


12

Band is a very imprecise term. Many swing bands contain stringed instruments (Double Bass obviously or Bass Guitar) and some have contained string sections. Pop bands can contain almost anything. Orchestras can contain almost anything as well, but pretty much but tend to be Strings Woodwinds Brass Percussion In symphonic situations. Philharmonics tend ...


12

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


11

Small ensembles in the pop and folk idiom can all go by the term of band; this answer will focus on what are referred to as "large ensembles." In the jazz context, the name of orchestra was historically applied in order to give credence to groups that would otherwise have been marginalized by the cultural mainstream and racism. That term has now been ...


11

Is there a particular set of skills that you'd say is required before one considers joining a band? Not really. Look for other players at about your own skill level. If you are taking classes, perhaps your teacher can advise you of others looking to play together. If you are reasonably comfortable playing in front of others, you should do reasonably ...


9

Your drummer should be capable of playing along to a rhythm set by another instrument rather than leading the tempo all the time. Can he drum along to a metronome? If the problem is that the keyboard isn't always sounding the beat (maybe you have a couple of bars without playing, or just holding a chord without rhythm?) then you need to add something for ...


9

You say they're willing to learn, but do they understand what that means? Does the band have a director (or other person who is "in charge"), or does everything happen by consensus? Have they agreed that on this subject you are in charge? How do you spend your rehearsal time? Do you spend any of it on "technique" or "meta" stuff, or do you just rehearse ...


9

In an orchestral situation, it is a terrible idea to rely on the conductor - they may not be able to cue you or instead are going to give a more important cue. Just because you are not playing does not mean you're allowed to sit and wait for a bus. Scores that have been edited well will have "cues" written in the parts, so, say you zone out accidentally or ...


8

It's just a name: it used to be based on four bars, which probably would comprise one set of chord changes (eg doowop, I vi IV V), but could just as easily be two or eight bars. It's like calling a song's bridge a 'middle eight', even though the number of bars may be different. The Beatles always called their bridges 'middle eights'.


8

I can certainly explain why there aren't many rock bands with multiple drummers. Because every garage band practices in the drummer's garage. The drummer can't fit the drum set in the back of his mom's Celica, so everyone else else comes over to his house. Plus, even when the van is working, it's a pain to lug the set around. Much easier with guitars ...


7

I think you should concentrate on teaching you drummer first, because the drums is easiest to pick up the rhythm from. The bass is also important, but is sometimes hard to hear the beat precisely enough. The bass drum is the most important for keeping a steady beat. When that is in place, it will also be easier for the others to follow. If the guitar solo is ...


7

In order to rehearse for maximum effect, we need to first identify the purpose of rehearsal and the objectives we seek to achieve. Here are the key things that group rehearsals should address: Collective practice up to a point where a piece can be performed as a group, Perfection of performance nuances, especially those that involve more than one ...


7

I agree with Tangurena's answer. I would add that if you aren't sure about your skills at the moment, find one or two people you can jam with that are better than you. I've found that playing with people better than me forces me you get better faster than just playing on my own.


6

I think in this context, "Piano Score" is a mistranslation. That would usually indicate an arrangement that has been condensed from an original instrumentation down to piano plus solo instrument or voice. Carl Witthoft's link contains the following image: The instrumentation is drums, guitars, and voice (and I would call this a "Band Score"). If the ...


6

I agree with Tim. A lot of bands tend to crank up their instruments way too loudly which is unfortunate. Everybody wants to be heard. Vocals are crucial for a vocal based band and the band should really work on mixing. Things you can do are make sure that the Vocalist can be heard clearly over all of the other instruments, especially the lead guitar and ...


6

Craig, the other answers all address the possibility that his "singing nowhere near as good" is because he's getting drowned out by the other band members. There's another possiblity as well. If he sings very well by himself, accompanying himself, that doesn't necessarily translate into singing well with other people who are accompanying him. It's a ...


6

In an orchestra, let the conductor do the work for you - they should let you know your moment is coming. In a smaller group, say a string quartet, you wouldn't expect such long rests (after all, you're 25% of the ensemble) - but learn what the other parts sound like and use that to time your return. So instead of "Now I count 64 bars", it's "I'll come back ...


5

Joining a band should not be a question of your abilities. Sure, those are important, but the most important factor is your passion for playing with other people. If this is something that drives you or makes you go insane at the very thought of it, then look for a band without delay. Or form yours. You only really get better when you have to perform.


5

If there's a lot of electronics going on that the drummer needs to always be in time with, then a click track on an earpiece is really the only option. This is pretty standard for professionals to use with in-ear monitors. If the tempo doesn't vary immensely and the keyboard is only playing from time to time, then I don't think there's reason enough to ...


5

In practice I've come across 4 solutions for using several different guitars (that need to go into one amp, I suppose): use a router switch (e.g. this one). In this case you use one cable per guitar. use a mute pedal (you could use a tuner pedal which mutes the output when switched on). Here you would use the same cable for all guitars. use a volume pedal ...


5

Apart from the fact that one drummer can produce enough volume to compete with guitarists, even with a big rig,every sound he produces on the drums, and even on the hi-hat, is a short sound. With two drummers, each 'note' they play will have to be timed more accurately than, say, chords on a guitar.This should be easy to accomplish, but my experience says ...


4

I suppose with a cornet you'll have the ability to add something extra in for texture, so something like finding the main melody line in the song, whether it be with guitar or vocals have the trumpet follow this line to emphasise the line and it could offer a massive difference to the sound and feel of the song depending, you should try looking at reel big ...


4

I would recommend you avoid trying to use video. Unless you are 'local' to each other the latency and jitter makes it very difficult to play together. Audio can be encoded with much lower latency and is typically a fixed bandwidth requirement so this copes better with connection issues. Tools like Jamulus (http://sourceforge.net/projects/llcon/) are ...


4

Have you considered a brass instrument like trombone or euphonium? For me, the embouchures share some important characteristics, while still being distinct enough that one shouldn't mess up the other. If you are an advanced player and plan on pursuing music as a career, I would highly recommend continuing to practice bassoon throughout marching season, ...


4

In swing setups such (e.g. tenor sax battles), it is not uncommon so see "trades" of varying (typically decreasing) length : trade 16, then trade 8, trade 4 and sometimes even trade 2 then trade 1, each time building up the tension. Things could also end in both musicians improvising simultaneously. Nice example from Robert Altman's Kansas City: ...


4

You don't actually have to count every bar that you don't play especially if you go many bars without playing anything. Most large form pieces and even Jazz pieces are broken down into smaller parts i.e. an A section, a B section, C section, ect. So you could have sections A, B, and C be 32 bars each and you many not start playing until 4 bars into section ...


4

I can only think of two rock-oriented bands with two drummers: The Allman Brothers Band and the Grateful Dead. In both cases, as I understand it, there's one drummer (Bill Kreutzmann for the Dead, Butch Trucks for the ABB) who is primarily responsible for the timekeeping and another (Mickey Hart, Jaimoe) who focus more on providing flourishes and a greater ...


3

There are a few ways to look at venues vs bands. Some bands can play the same venue all the time and still not become overexposed while other bands only need to play once and no one cares if they ever come back again. UPDATE: if you consider venue vs stable audience I think there is a spectrum with one side being a venue that has a new audience every time ...


3

It takes more time and effort, but seeing your potential future bandmates in action is the best way. It means that you may have to go to the venues that these folks play in, and I don't know if you're old enough to get into some of these places. If you are old enough, try not to get sucked in by the drink-your-face-off-at-the-open-mic scenario. You can see ...


3

Generally, the distinction is between a "military band" and a "symphony orchestra", historically the two most common types of large instrumental ensembles. The major difference between those two is that a military band has no stringed instruments (with the possible exception of double bass), instead replacing that area of the sonic space with additional ...



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