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According to the Wikipedia article on accordion music genres, many popular bands of the 1910s and 1920s employed an accordion player, including the Paul Whiteman Orchestra and the Horace Heidt Orchestra (though I'd not heard of the latter before reading the above article). So it looks like the answer to my question is that accordions were used in ...


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This is not a question of whether the band is rehearsing the right way or the wrong way. Since the band has existed longer than you've been a member, and the other members are content with the situation, the band's current rehearsal seems to fit the goals of the other members. They might be more interested in playing comfortable material than pushing ...


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As I see it, only you and your bandmates can answer this, because it depends on what you want to do. First off, if you're not gigging... what exactly are you rehearsing for? Someone needs to step up and book gigs, or else I don't see why there's a band in the first place. Assuming you have gigs at some schedule, then I see rehearsal potentially doing three ...


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One question that this spawns is Has the band played many gigs - in the 6 mths you've been with them? I suspect the answer is no. Too much time spent (wasted) in rehearsals to have a playlist of enough numbers. Sounds harsh. But I've been (for short times, I hasten to add!) in bands like this. I call them 'rehearsal bands' as this is all they do! Some do it ...


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Average "accordion patches" try to capture the look&feel of a "typical" accordion. Which lean a bit towards the awful side. The accordion is really a portable harmonium with much more delicate pressure control (which is one reason harmoniums went out of fashion and accordions not). An "accordion patch" does not offer this minute continuous control, ...


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The explanations I could think of: The composer could have decided that the piano part can be played by an accordion as well to give it a different timbre (Experimenting with the instrument setup) The charts are sort of universally written so accordion players can participate as well. This way it's the arranger's choice to include an accordion. And ...


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To echo what Faza wrote, it depends on the conductor, as I saw a lecture of Benjamin Zander "it is the conductor which brings out the best of the players".



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