New answers tagged

0

Having just returned from a fabulous concert by an amateur band in rural France, with nigh on 30 players INCLUDING KEYS, a concert band will do you fine. It doesn't have to be a brass or wind band, and most orchetras play the more 'serious' music. In this band, the keys used several different sounds (as I do when playing keys with various ensembles), so it ...


5

Let me begin by saying that I can't really answer your question about whether you should join a concert band or an orchestra (mainly because I find that to be highly subjective), however, there is one point in your question that I believe is important to address: As far as I understood, you want to learn a new instrument and join a band/orchestra with that ...


1

http://www.cstreetbrass.com/ 2 trumpets; http://www.mnozilbrass.at/en/ 3 trumpets You're really only limited by the arrangements.. and even then you could easily double on parts.


0

Even though your band is playing modern styles that don't require "technical" theory as would be required for, say, classical music, having a knowledge of "how music works" is still important to successful playing in those genres. For example, your drummer is going to drum more confidently if he understands how the rhythms of the piece fit together; your ...


2

If your band is just learning and playing cover songs note-for-note, then having theory knowledge may not be as important. However, if you are writing your own songs or doing any improvising then music theory will certainly be beneficial. Music theory is a very broad topic and there are so many aspects of theory that can be extremely useful. Verbally ...


2

If you are too forceful of the issue, your band members may not take it too kindly. If they are fairly accomplished musicians and are interested, they would have probably looked into learning theory already. Perhaps you could wait until a situation in the band comes along where theory has proved itself useful and tell them then. There are some musicians who ...


10

I'll focus mainly on the Or why I should not worry about it part of your question. I believe that in bands, the most important thing is to be able to play the songs you want (and compose if you like). I recently played with a pianist that didn't know anything about theory, but could work out pretty much everything with his ear. I don't think I would ...


3

In the band I was in most recently, the two members who had the best traditional music theory knowledge were actually the worst at working out songs by ear; sometimes it even seemed that their presuppositions misled them into thinking that a song 'should be' one way, when in fact it was another. (Of course, correctly understood, knowledge shouldn't 'hurt' ...


9

I've had various bands with members who know differing amounts of theory. Some people knew no theory and others had degrees in music. In the long run, it usually made no difference as those who really knew no theory had a good practical of things. Those who knew the theory could learn songs much faster. In one band, I was able to help by going through fake ...


1

Get a more experienced musician than any of the band members to direct your rehearsal. Don't be too loud. Do you need amplification at all? If there are mics on the drum kit, something is VERY wrong. Remember, the congregation tolerate the noise you make as the price of getting youngsters along to the church. But you COULD also try to make music ...


2

Make sure that each band member knows that 'practice' is done at home, and rehearsal is done as a band. Make a song list of all the tunes you'll play over the next few months - e.g, select a number of songs (say 12) for a quarter, and play different combinations of songs each week; if it's a new band without much experience, you can't drop a whole new set ...


3

Practicing with a metronome is the best way to improve your timing, rhythm, groove, etc. Each band member should be practicing on their own with a metronome because if each band member can keep good time then you will all play better together as a band. You can also use a click track during band practice to work on your timing together as a band. You can ...


0

I agree with @Karen. The problem appears to be that you have a different goal orientation from your other bandmates. You have a Learning goal orientation and your band members have a Performance goal orientation. Despite the name, Performance goal orientation is not necessarily the best orientation for actual musical performance. From Which Should You ...



Top 50 recent answers are included