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1

Here are a couple of suggestions to address your question. If you and your band mates can agree on always "making room" for whatever instrument is taking a solo, that is bound to help. Many electric guitar players ( and I am one) believe a certain level of volume is essential to producing a desired tone. Making that principle secondary to the one above ...


4

It's partly about the volume but also about the range of frequencies the guitars cover. An electric guitar (if distorted) covers from quite low - almost bass up to higher middle ('harsh') - quite a broad range and can be a piercing sound if one string is played at a time. An acoustic guitar covers a broader upper range (you probably notice the "tinkly" ...


2

Just bring the volume of everything right down. It can happen gradually or suddenly. It is quite a dramatic effect, and often gets the crowd actually listening again. Electric guitars can be played well quietly - prove to your guitarist that it can happen! Drums may change to brushes,rutes or even hands, or just play gently, perhaps using cymbals.If the ...


4

It is true that an electric guitar CAN overpower an acoustic guitar and will in most stage settings. But there are things you can do to compensate for this. I would suggest a simple "Boost" stomp box that you can run your acoustic through which will give you the ability to add a 10 - 20 db boost (depending on which box) by simply stepping on the foot ...



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