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The characteristics of a chaconne will not be the same in every time period and country. That said, generally when I see that the name of a piece is "chaconne", I expect a repeated bassline, most often a descending tetrachord (from the tonic to the dominant). I should note the similarity to a passacaglia, which also frequently makes use of a descending ...


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The Goldberg Variations being in mostly the same key may only indicate that key isn't what is being varied. Texture, process, tessitura, rhythm, etc., can all be varied. The canons are different by way of the follower's entry interval.


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The repeating part is often in the bass. The Ferrari sound to me like: I, V, vi, iii (or I6),IV, V, in the key of E major. So does the Caccini, when the bass kicks in after a short intro, but in the key of B major. I didn't listen to the others to see if they were also identical.


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Seems like there is an alternation between G major and A minor (or G major and E major) regions. La Foia, the Passamezzo Antico, and Romanesca all do similar things. There are some scores of these pieces hanging around the net.


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There used to be a series of records called Music Minus One which released many concerto recordings with only the orchestra. Perhaps a search on "Music Minus One" may help. They are still around: http://digital.musicminusone.com/ The other possibility is to find a stereo recording where the soloist has been fed to both channels equally. The channels can be ...


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You could try a MIDI rendition, there are quite good ones out there, just do a google search. With a MIDI player that allows you instrument selection of muting (VanBasco Karaoke Player is good one and very simple to use), you can mute the harpsichord and play on top. Now, soundwise a MIDI rendition will only be as good as the sounds you have available. The ...



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