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1

That is an A-B-A form on the bigger picture. Since the suites are collections of dances to be performed as a whole, I suppose the composers are trying to build a form structure on the overall as well.


2

A dance with its doubles - in this particular case (English Suite no. 1), Courante II and its doubles - is essentially a variation form. A double is a variation of the preceding dance. Also, often when Galanterien have been paired up, such as the Bourées here, the first is repeated da capo at the end of the second (as is the case with English Suite no. 1), ...


0

I translate the paragraph of the German wikipedia article Suite here: Many dances appear in a super-imposed three-part scheme, where the middle part contrasts by one or more of the following: is written in a relative key contains a variation is differently instrumentated Examples for the resulting scheme are: Bourrée I – Bourrée II – Bourrée I ...


2

A dance in binary form, usually with repeats; slow triple time, usually with an emphasis on the second beat. That's about all that is really constant - the form evolved from what was originally a lively dance in triple metre.


2

Triple time is about the only stable thing about the sarabande. It started life as a Guatemalan/ Spanish/Arabian dance, with a rapid tempo, danced by women, and accompanied with castanets. It was regarded by some as risque and banned. Later the French took it on as a much more staid dance, still with the 3 feel, and it was accepted as a more genteel dance, ...


0

It's easy to see a figure consisting of a stack of thirds, and think that this represents the chord. But this isn't necessarily the case. The figures here could more plainly be seen as merely ornamenting a central pitch with upper and lower auxiliary tones, a third above and below. It may seem odd to think of notes a third away as neighbors, since that term ...


3

If I may offer a different analysis of the excerpt in question, it appears to me that the progression moves as thus: I6/3 - ii - V6/5 - I Intermediary arpeggiations are upper-tertian embellishment that essentially just serves as smooth harmonic leading between chords. This is a very common progression for the period and a very common progression for JS ...


2

I'm inclined to agree with @dwn. The relative major here isn't particularly tonicised: it is just emphasised a bit by melodic motion through the upper auxiliary, and a slowdown of harmonic rhythm. It is otherwise just a natural conclusion to the preceding sequence. It's the next 2 bars that start to look a bit more like a conventional cadence, only Bach ...


0

I'm not well versed, but to me it just looks like a sort of not-yet-rooted tonic, with the G (last treble note in the 2nd measure) being a neighbor tone. I'd agree that the effect of mediant as anticipation seems negligible.



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