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1

If you take a look at the St John's Passion by Bach, it is surprisingly operatic with its use of turba choirs and the kind of introductory chorus and the dying scenes. It is true that Bach was employed by churches for large stretches of his time (as opposed to his time in K├Âthen, for example), including his final years. But if you take a look at his magnum ...


11

Baroque music was all about expressiveness, and the rhythm was not necessarily meant to be held as strictly as the Renaissance tactus. Wheat Williams has mentioned historically informed performance, and as he says, these things are debated academically. But there is some good indication that Baroque composers did think of slowing down at the end of pieces. ...


9

Wheat Williams covered the basics of historically-informed-performance quite well. I want to add that unmeasured preludes (not uncommon in Baroque music) indicate that Baroque composers did have a concept of give-and-take in regards to tempo. (You can look at examples of preludes here or here to see what the music looked like.) So, while the purists may ...


5

"Historically informed" practitioners will tell you all kinds of stuff overgeneralized from a narrow modern point of view. For example, that dynamics in keyboards are a modern invention. Clavichords were perfectly capable of nuanced dynamic play, and larger instruments like harpsichords had several manuals and registration possibilities in order to allow ...


18

Questions like this cause endless debate among scholars. The basic fact is that sheet music from the Baroque era tends to have a great deal less detail and specificity about interpretive matters than sheet music written in later eras. Bowing directions for strings are never given; the only dynamic markings used are often just "p" and "f", and there are no ...


6

Go to Wikipedia and look up the articles on each of these composers. At the bottom, under "References" you will find bibliographies of well-regarded printed book biographies of each of these composers, as well as books on music history. Hit the library and look them up and read them. Are you asking about what kind of instruments in general, or about the ...


2

There are fantastic lectures from prof. Robert Greenberg from I think Berkeley. His lectures on all these giant bigger then life composers on the teaching company website. He goes in depth their life, work, and also their caprices. Very informing and a plus entertaining. About Bach he played on the organs of the noblemen that he was employed by. He wasn't a ...



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