Hot answers tagged

19

It's a trick that's been around for ages, with many variations - I've even heard that the use of certain bodily fluids gives good results, but it isn't something I'm about to try. The main reason to do this is to save money, but you should ask yourself whether the savings are worth it. It's generally a better idea to keep your strings in good shape - wiping ...


14

It's a simile. There are a few different types of similes and this one means "play the last notated measure again". So in this piece you will end up playing the measure before the simile marks 3 times, then play the next notated measure. It's pretty much a very shorthand way of saying "Play what you just played again".


13

When converting a fretted instrument to fret less you have a couple of options if you want to DIY: Modify the current fingerboard in some way. This includes purchasing a fret-puller like @ekaj suggests, pulling out all the fretwires, and filling in all the fret slots with wood putty. Unfortunately you will suffer from the issues that @Alex mentions in that ...


13

What you seek, my friend, is "the groove". As you're discovering, there's more to it than the mechanical (or even mathematical) approach of playing certain notes with a triplet rhythm. While your approach is technically correct, I'm guessing it lacks the feeling you're looking for. That's what's known as "groove" or being "in the pocket" or (especially ...


13

There are many different ways to approach playing bass and depending on what style you are trying to go for it may be all you need to fill the sound. I'll explain a few simple styles and techniques that can spice up a bass line. Octaves Rather simple, but effective. Your still playing only the root note, but changing the octave is a very simple and ...


12

Try playings some new styles of music; like funk or jazz or some other area you haven't spent a lot of time in; listen to some new music, groove along to it, Jazz in particular is awesome for this especially for bass. Try mixing up your playing a bit, listen to chords, outline them with arpeggios if possible, all of these things will help.


12

Sure, of course you can. But getting it to playable condition won't be quite so simple. You'll have to re-adjust the bridge to account for the fact that the thickest string is now located where the thinnest string was, and vice-versa. If you don't feel comfortable doing this yourself (although it's pretty easy), any competent guitar tech will do it for ...


12

The technical term is glissando or gliss slide. Whether you're going up or down or both, basically it's a long slide.


11

Be very, very careful. You're worrying about the string snapping. You should also be worrying about damaging the neck of your instrument. A bass string will go very tight without snapping. If it does snap, you risk injury. I've had a nasty cut just from a guitar string! If the instrument breaks, you also risk injury -- and you've broken your instrument. ...


11

My advice is to learn the bass parts of songs for which you wish you had created that bass part instead of the player who actually did. For example, I spent a good part of my late teens pretty much learning every bass part on Blood Sugar Sex Magik, because I thought everything Flea played was awesome. After that, it was onto Sly & The Family Stone ...


11

If you are planning to be a really good player, you should be able to start on either finger. This depending on which string you are starting on and which string the next note is on as well as which brain cell you are using. That last part is a joke however you won't want to make conscious decisions about which finger you start with. This will all be ...


11

Welcome to the wonderful world of non-standard intonation. You will like it here. I have answered here on instruments where you have to dictate the intonation: slide and steel guitar and theremin. I haven't mentioned violin/fiddle, because by the time you're good enough for it to be worthwhile to ask questions in this sort of forum, you've already learned ...


11

With bass guitar, you can often have a lot of success skipping the amp altogether and running the bass through a DI box directly into the mixing board. Or you can take a hybrid approach, where you record the direct signal from the DI box and the signal from a mic'd amp into separate tracks, and then mix the two together. The general idea here is that the DI ...


10

When you fret a note make sure that your finger is as close to the edge of the fret as possible; literally right next to it; this will instantly give you a cleaner sound; the closer to the metal you get the purer the note, this applies to all fretted instruments and all styles of playing. (the edge towards the bridge, not the nut) Do this consciously until ...


10

I change my strings when they start to sound stale, about every 4-6 months. As a gauge, I play about 5 hours a week in my church, plus an additional hour or two of practice on top of that. When I used DR coated strings, they would last a bit longer than that, but even with the extra life I had a hard time justifying the extra cost.


10

This is not a common thing. Members of the TalkBass forum discuss it as a novelty. It appears to be a variant of the "Funk Fingers", which is a pair of short drumsticks attached to the first two fingers. It was invented by Tony Levin, while working with Peter Gabriel, as a way to get funky percussive sounds out of a bass. ...


10

Any answer to this must be opinionated, can't help that. Whilst there are many good basses out there, $500 for your first is more than enough.There is no need to spend that sort of money.I've said it loads of times, but why buy new ? My first bass cost me £15. O.k., I had to mend its broken neck, but it kept me going for the first 8 or 9 years. I recommend ...


10

+ Pick Perhaps the most relevant advantage of a pick is that you can do palm mute, which is pretty useful on bass (in fact rather more useful than on guitar). IMO that's about it, though! As far as the string-plucking itself is concerned, a pick has no real advantage over good finger technique. Some points that pick-proponents tend to make include "It's ...


10

I have had to do this with 3 of my guitars, and by far my best results have been from filling the hole with wood glue and then pushing 3 matchsticks in. Once the glue dries, I use a new screw - same width as the old one, but longer. Super glue really doesn't work on wood - you need wood glue, or wood filler.


9

A bass player can easily be the timekeeper for a jazz combo without drums. I'm a bit confused by your question, specifically-- Is it fairly easy to replace substantial portions with improvised walking-bass style lines and still retain the percussive properties of the bass sound? The properties of the timbre are going to be up to your bassist, but on ...


9

Tapewound strings are similar in construction to other wound bass strings; the difference is that they have a length (or 'tape') of nylon wrapped around a metal core. This makes them feel less tough on fingers, and the tone they produce does not quickly degrade in time, as standard round/flatwound strings will. The Sound they produce is different as well. ...


9

I used to do this with bass strings, and it does make a difference. They'll brighten up and sound like new, but not for as long as they did right out of the package. It's a bit of a pain, though, because of course to remove the strings, you have to fully unwind them rather than simply cut them, so it takes longer. I wouldn't try this with guitar strings, ...


9

CADG is the most common way I've heard this term used for basses. It could also refer to the drop D tuning with a low C on the bottom according to Wikipedia, in guitar context: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drop_c_tuning Incidentally orchestral basses fitted with a low C extention have the CADG tuning too, although with the extension no fingering changes are ...


9

For windows: The bare-bones way is to use the microphone or the line-in. I found the line-in to be a better choice, but either way, you need to reduce the amplifier volume to avoid clipping. This volume level will be pretty low, and it is specific to your equipment. After you adjust the amplifier volume, you can then adjust the overall volume on the ...


9

Electric bass strings are much thicker, hence heavier, than electric guitar strings - this allows them to sound at a much lower frequency without needing double the length. (Guitars have scale lengths in the region 24-25 inches, electric basses around 30-34 inches depending on the style. The thickest guitar strings are usually a single steel core with a ...


9

It can be done with either the fretting hand or the picking hand and there are several methods that can be used such as: The fretting hand can lift up slightly to mute a note that was just being fretted. Letting the pressure up and resting the finger on the string will stop it from vibrating. The fretting hand can mute adjacent strings that is not being ...


8

As guitarist who plays bass occasionally, I can tell you that bass strings just seem to be pricier. But they also last much, much longer. Of course after some time, they loose some brilliance but after that they usually keep the sound for a long time. The sweat-production of your hands also reduces the life of your strings. In general I'd say that ...


8

Tab notation does not include any timing information -- the closest you get is bar lines, which at least helps you orientate yourself. Some books present tab alongside a traditional musical score, so you can get pitch, timing and phrasing from the stave, and choice of string/fret from the tab. The notes on the tabs are lined up with the notes on the stave. ...



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