Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Tim is right. It's just cosmetic - if you like the look, fine. But I have basses that have seen decades of frequent use that I haven't polished and they're fine. Guitar repair people will tell you different, I imagine. But they earn their money that way.


1

http://www.warwick.de/warwick/data/Warwick.de/Technical%20PDF/Manuals/WWBassManual_en_2013.pdf: Natural Oil Finish: Here you can use the included beeswax. Apply the beeswax with a polishing cloth using circular movements. After applying, wait 2 to 3 minutes and then remove the excess with a dry polishing cloth. The beeswax should be applied a minimum ...


1

Having done some homework, your bass has no lacquer or paint as a finish - it's natural wood. As such, every couple of months it needs a feed/clean and beeswax is the stuff. Not heavily applied, and well rubbed off after, it puts a barrier on to help stop sweat etc., being absorbed into the wood. If you like a well-used look to your guitar, don't ...


0

Well, assuming that sufficient fighting has gone into it, you can take a look at the music typesetter LilyPond's definition. It has a drop c tuning apparently only for guitar (which then is one step down from drop d) but not for bass. With guitar, the definition makes sense because of facilitating easier chords. With bass, I don't know: chords don't make ...


1

Your second tuning (C-A-D-G) is drop c, because the 'drop' part only refers to the lowest string. The first tuning you showed (C-G-C-F) would be D drop C, because every string is tuned down a whole step to D-G-F-C (D-standard tuning), and the lowest string is tuned down further to a C.



Top 50 recent answers are included