New answers tagged

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I alternate between a pick and fingers for various reasons. I'll mainly use my fingers when I'm playing songs which only require the low end strings, however I'll switch to a pick if I need to play songs which require the high strings to be used. Why? Mainly due to the fact that my index finger is significantly shorter than my middle finger (my two plucking ...


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Yes, the positions correspond. That doesn't necessarily mean that you won't have to reconsider physical finger positions a little, because the spacing between notes is so much tighter, and you'll actually have more notes within reach from a given hand position.


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I've used one in a normal covers rock band, and found it great fun, but not massively flexible. They don't sound like a conventional bass guitar as the sound doesn't have a lot of highs or sustain, but you can get a nice mellow double bass-like sound out of them, and the close fret spacing also allows the playing of very tight, fast bass parts with very ...


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I think it really depends on the setting! For a coffeehouse acoustic gig it might be the ideal instrument. There is a lot of discussion about them on bass guitar forums, which makes me think that the bass community, at least, considers them to be legit. From my time as a bassist I know that 95% of the audience don't even count how many strings you are ...


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Their sound is pretty solid. They don't sound 100% like a electric bass guitar, but they don't sound that different. To an untrained ear, I think this difference will pass unnoticed. They are being used in more than just gimmicks. People use them like they would use a normal bass guitar: ...


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While tab is a good way to convey the specific notes played in a passage it is not great at getting timing across and as such should be taken with a large grain of salt. Some tab conventions are better than others but if you are trying to learn a specif passage you still need to listen to the original and get to know it to work out which notes are crucial ...


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In an old instrument, solder connections can get knocked around and become brittle if not done well. Bad shielding and bad grounding is a common issue with instruments and their lead cables. Check your solder connections inside the control cavity of your bass. Look specifically for the wire that leads from the top of a potentiometer to the bridge. That is ...


4

When playing crotchets- 4 in a bar - there are few ways to divide up the bar. 4 beats, 3+1 beats, 1+3 beats, or 2+2. With quavers (8ths), the number of variants is much greater. So being able to put in the last quaver of a bar, followed by the first beat of the next, for example is an advantage of being able to use 8s. Popping usually occurs on the 'off ...


12

They're a staple of rock, and as bass guitar is often used as a rock instrument, they are seen as one of the basic techniques of bass playing. With many rock rhythms, quarter notes are too slow and make the song feel lethargic, while 16ths are too frantic and hard to play. 8th notes are, for many songs, just the right thing to drive things forward with the ...


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I'm probably the best from a technical standpoint but from what I have been taught and understand from others is: Drop C (C1-G1-C2-F2) Low C (C1-A1-D2-G2)


1

I find that flatwounds can, in most circumstances, help you deliver a more solid low-mids tone that works in a band environment. The flipside is that for home practice you miss the 'zing' of roundwounds for a while. I play in a band with two electric 12 string guitarists, so I never really needed good biting high frequencies: your experience may be different....


1

The closer the curve of a fretboard is to the curve of your hand, the easier playing will be, but a flatter fretboard should allow a player to play faster and perform better bends. To answer your question, most people benefit from the ease of playability from a radius, even if only a slight radius, so most companies build rounded fretboards, but from what ...


3

Really depends on what you're looking for. If you want a more aggressive sound (usually used in punk/metal) bands, you can go for a distortion or an overdrive pedal. You might also find useful a compressor pedal for live shows. If you want loops, you'll need a looper pedal. I personally like the Fuzz pedals and use them quiet often. Many bassists use wah ...


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As a certain footwear company would say, "Just do it". The vast majority of basses will have roundwound strings on when you buy them, so play them for a while. When you're beginning bass, the important aspect is locking in with a drummer, and although there is a sound difference between roundwound and flatwound strings, you'll never hear it in a band ...


4

Most beginner basses come with round-wounds because these strings are more common (and therefore cheaper, supply and demand or something like that, the kids all want to play rock and roll with twangy sounds). For jazz/musical theatre I will usually use flat wounds and for anything wanting a little more bite then steel round-wounds. Obviously, as with ...


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Flat wound strings tend to sound less bright than roundwound. If you're concerned about finger wear, then I suppose flatwounds are a little kinder, although I use roundwound on most of my basses, and still have all my fingers - and no callouses!! I have a couple of fretless, and to me, they are made for flatwounds. The other slight problem is that flatwounds ...



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