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3

This track seems to me to be right on the beat. Keys dictate the tempo, but drums and bass lock in with them. Nothing is pushed or pulled. The tempo on the track I listened to started at 98bpm went to 104 towards the middle, but no one instrument seemed to make this happen. If you're having problems with the rhythm section keeping together, try facing each ...


2

Typically the rhythm guitarist, drummer and bass player set the groove. If they're not locking, then the drummer and bass player should set the groove, especially for R&B. The drummer, bassist and guitarist should all play on the same place within those cute little Gaussian curves that are the beat. What I hear in your question is that the rhythm ...


1

Repeating what everyone else said: that symbol means repeat the last bar. Periodically, there are also ones that mean repeat the last two (or however many) bars. I don't remember off the top of my head what made that one look different, it was very similar, but I believe there was a number printed that helped with that conclusion. They can't just put in ...


4

It is short-hand for "play this measure the same way you played the previous measure". Sometimes it is called the "repeat bar" symbol. It is not particular to music notation for bass. It is frequently found, for instance, in fake-book charts and in notation for the "rhythm section" in jazz, meaning percussion, bass, piano and guitar (with guitar, ...


14

It's a simile. There are a few different types of similes and this one means "play the last notated measure again". So in this piece you will end up playing the measure before the simile marks 3 times, then play the next notated measure. It's pretty much a very shorthand way of saying "Play what you just played again".


1

Swing really doesn't consist of triplets at all. When you play a lot of triplets you actually destroy the swing. It seems to me there are several elements: 2-bar or 4-bar phrasing. This is very important. The moment you go into thinking 1-bar phrases the swing stops. long bass notes. Classically trained players will typically play quavers followed by ...


3

The term "Bass VI" applies to the Music Man Silhouette Baritone Bass. The Bass VI name comes from the Fender Bass VI introduced in 1961 before "normal" six string basses existed (or at least were widely known). At least some other makers, e.g. Eastwood t (Sidejack Bass VI) and Schecter (Hellcat vi), have adopted this naming. This is one of those cases ...


0

I suppose it could be a baritone guitar, although there is a model that is tuned A-A. The strings don't look very thick. The reason most BASSES are tuned BEADGC is to keep the 4th tuning between strings. The reason GUITARS are tuned EADGBE is to facilitate chord playing. Generally, basses are not used for chord work, so this is maybe an attempt to get ...



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