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5

Well, I'll have to disagree with your teacher. Do aim at one finger per fret as a default! The three-fret technique is essentially a variation of the standard way to finger notes on double bass, due to Franz Simandl. Double bass requires about five times as much force as electric bass (apart from having a considerably longer scale), so it's really tough to ...


3

As a beginning bass player I've been working through Ed Friendland's Hal Leonard Bass Method, which starts out using just first, second, and fourth fingers spanning three frets. He introduces one finger per fret (spanning four frets) as an advanced technique in volume two, and teaches that you should pivot between second and third fingers rather than ...


1

Dependent mostly on the length of fingers. One finger per fret works pretty well on guitar, but not so on bass. it is more noticeable on the bottom 4 or 5 frets (one of the reasons I prefer 5 string - no real need to play down there!). Playing scalar stuff, o.f.p.fret does actually work at the bottom, but for playing I, IV, V as you do a lot I might use ...


2

Like everything else in music, fingering is definitely a preference thing. There are some ways that are more economical than others, but it ultimately boils down to what is more comfortable for the player. In general, the one-finger-per-fret rule still applies for bass. In a lot of music genres, bass players do a lot of roots, fifths and octaves. If you're ...


0

For the science nerds: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/waves/string.html The resonant frequencies of the string are a function of it's length and the "wave velocity". The later one describes how fast mechanical waves can travel along the string. It's a function of tension and "mass per unit length". The longer, heavier and floppier the string: ...


1

Let's get specific: The scale lengths of these instruments are, typically: Upright bass: 41.5 inches or 105.4cm Bass guitar: 34 inches or 86.36 cm Electric guitar: 25.5 inches or 64.8 cm (There are of course exceptions among different models of these instruments) The upright bass and the acoustic guitar are many centuries old. The dimensions and scale ...


0

You should look at the overall size of these instruments separately from their "scale length": the measure of the string from the bridge to the nut. If you look at a bass guitar, note that the bridge is close to the end of the instrument. This is not the case on a double bass. The bridge is a wooden piece held by string pressure against body, and is ...


7

Electric bass strings are much thicker, hence heavier, than electric guitar strings - this allows them to sound at a much lower frequency without needing double the length. (Guitars have scale lengths in the region 24-25 inches, electric basses around 30-34 inches depending on the style. The thickest guitar strings are usually a single steel core with a ...


6

You would need to double the length if you used the same strings under the same tension, but they're not. Bass strings are usually thicker and vibrate slower. If pitch were purely a function of string length you wouldn't be able to tune a fixed-length instrument.


2

You'd think so, yes. However, the standard length was conjured up by a certain Mr. Fender, and the strings basically follow on from the guitar length and gauge. Since the top string of a bass guitar (G) is slightly higher in pitch than the lowest on a guitar, but slightly longer, to get a similar tension, it's about the same gauge. Average bottom string on ...



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