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Rather than asking what's correct, try it and see whether you like it. If you play a part without any muting and you like how it sounds, stick with it. However, most bassists mute a lot, and here's why: Bass parts are generally monophonic, rooting the music, and having other notes hanging around confuses things. Whereas guitarists often finger chords even ...


2

I play bass myself, started off with guitar of course, and I must say that both instruments are very different when it comes to muting. While a guitar, depending on the genre or the part you're playing (like harmonic parts and ringing notes), can sound quite good without muting... A bass often does not. The reason for that is that the bass forms the ...


1

Because of the bass’s fundamental roles in harmony and rhythm, it’s especially important to play cleanly, clearly, and deliberately. Among other things, that means muting any unwanted tones. Bassists have a variety of muting techniques, using either hand or both together. On the fretting hand, you can touch unused strings with your fingertips, or lay ...


4

Generally players do mute unused strings. The commonest is using RH thumb on the bottom string (unless being played!) Some will use spare fingers of RH, and/or fleshy part of LH fingers. I know a bass player - session guy, incredible player, who devised his own muting method which involves each digit muting an unused string, leaving one spare for playing the ...


2

Tabs are usually done in parallel with "real" scores containing the detailed timing information. Where a tab is supposed to be self-sufficient, it has to contain quite more information than a "standard" tab. Take a look at the LilyPond documentation for \tabFullNotation: the text a bit above shows how things look with a standard score/tab combination ...



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