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10

I have had to do this with 3 of my guitars, and by far my best results have been from filling the hole with wood glue and then pushing 3 matchsticks in. Once the glue dries, I use a new screw - same width as the old one, but longer. Super glue really doesn't work on wood - you need wood glue, or wood filler.


1

Check out Scott's Bass Lessons https://www.scottsbasslessons.com/. He creates educational videos for all abilities. Most of his videos are free but he also has a paid for area with access to more resources.


0

My main advise when switching to a regular / long scale bass from a short scale would be to avoid stretching too much with your fretting hand. I try to play one finger per fret when I'm playing above the 5th fret but when you're down below the 5th move your hand instead of stretching. For example when going from a low F (1st fret on the E string) to an ...


1

I think the best option here is to set your strap so it's tight when you're sat down but the bass still sits on your knee. This way the position of the bass is the same when you're standing as when you're sat down. This also means you'll not have to adjust your playing style to play standing as everything should be the same. Also when it's set at that ...


1

Learning scales and arpeggios is a great way to improve your fretboard knowledge. Try and learn scales and arpeggios all over the fretboard and say out loud the notes as you play them. Don't worry about playing fast whilst doing this. Taking the time to get this in your head is the key here.


3

To directly answer your question: Same brand - no. Definitely not. Brands don't make a difference in terms of intonation, and different types of strings (rounds vs flats, for instance) shouldn't have a major effect either. Same gauge - while your bass or guitars won't be affected in terms of intonation by the gauge of the string, it's always worthwhile to ...


1

Its all about practice, just how some guitarists play their instruments behind their backs, all you have to do is practice memorizing your fretboard without looking. With time you will see that you don't need any lighting, you just need to feel the guitar(bass) in your hand and you will know just where everything is at.


2

Are you using an alternate tuning? I don't understand how there would be more than minor changes in intonation with changes in string gauge in standard tuning. If you are using an alternate tuning and it's sufficiently alternate--like you're tuning your guitar in fifths--then you're going to have some problems with intonation for some strings and frets ...


0

One thing to consider is the way the bass player you are recording plays. DI does indeed have greater clarity, if we are defining clarity as being a more accurate representation of what comes out of the instrument. However, most players are used to hearing what comes out of the amp rather than the instrument, so "clarity" can be a problem with players who ...


0

I guess you mean the 8th fret getting mixed up with 6th and 10th. Play standing up whenever you play, and try to hit that 8th fret without looking. After a while, your arm muscle memory will have learned how far to stretch. Eyes then come into play, as they know the target fret is between dots. Do it many times a day - just wear the bass, play 8th fret ...


0

What do you mean by variation? If you mean variation on a common theme, becoming good at improvisation requires passion and a good practice method. The player you saw probably spent an enormous amount of time behind his/her instrument, learning different songs, writing his own, perhaps even studying a theory. After doing this for so long, some players can ...


3

I've always gotten the best results from the hybrid approach that Alex Basson mentions. I'll usually even set up two microphones, one close up (Audix D6) and one further back to capture the sound of the room (your sE X1 should work well for this purpose). It looks like this: bass -> di box ---------------> mixer (channel 1) | v ...


11

With bass guitar, you can often have a lot of success skipping the amp altogether and running the bass through a DI box directly into the mixing board. Or you can take a hybrid approach, where you record the direct signal from the DI box and the signal from a mic'd amp into separate tracks, and then mix the two together. The general idea here is that the DI ...


2

It depends a lot on what equipment you're using for playing and recording. The recorded sound will be different using a mic and amp to play through, rather than D.I., but a good sound is easy to achieve going straight into the desk, if that's what you use. It always works for me, simple, fewer links to worry about, less stuff to set up, etc...



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