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5

There is no "have to" in music. There are common patterns and conventions, but the only rule is, if it sounds good, it is good. it doesn't sound out of place at the time ... and therefore it's OK. I have no idea what the implications of this may be if I was to try and apply EQ, or add certain effects, and so on EQ generally has very little effect ...


4

The steps would include. Determining the Key Providing points for Cadences Determining the chords and then there inversions And then finally you write a melody in response to the given notes. Things to note. The proper rules for good melody writing still apply to the bass line you are writing. Try and get the width of the melody an octave. Try to ...


1

Simple answer: 1) Find your places of cadence (a "resting point" within the piece). It looks like bar 8 beat 3 is a good candidate for a cadence. Since your melody falls on E, and since (aside from the unorthodox ending on D at the end) your key is in C major, and since you seem relatively new to harmony, this should be a C major chord or A minor chord; ...


1

First, you need to identify one or two candidate chords -- in a situation like this, you'll probably want to do this for each measure. Try them out on the piano to help you choose between them. For example, when there is a C in the melody, your candidate chords would be C major (I) and A minor (vi). Mostly likely you'll choose C major. Once you've ...



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