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21

There is a rather more fundamental, physical reason for this than so far mentioned: the bass fills not only the bass frequency range, but its harmonics actually reach well into the midrange where all other voices have their fundamentals! In fact, since the bass has typically the strongest amplitude1 of all tuned instruments (save perhaps trumpets, lead ...


12

Well first, the amount of power inherent in the average festival rig or even an installed club system will dwarf what you can get out of any four speakers on the planet. That chest-thumping kick drum that's a mainstay of EDM is produced by moving a lot of air very quickly, creating a shockwave you can feel. That requires a lot of big cones, in turn requiring ...


10

A few ideas: The most difficult but most flexible approach would be to continue playing with the synth programming until the synth sounds in tune on more notes, or program more synths to have similar sounds on different notes. Use pedal point. A bassline using pedal point constantly plays the same note, regardless of the changes in harmony. Done well, ...


9

As a bass player, I am typically trying to either play something unexpected/less than intuitive, or really awesome. Only when I am asked to fulfill a role in a band with a traditional approach to the bass part do I consistently end up relying on standard sorts of lines or the expected notes (there are definitely times where it sounds better to just chug on ...


8

You're not breaking any unwritten rules here. It is in fact pretty common to use the 5th of the chord leading up to the root a fourth higher in the bass. However, in your bassline the question is if you really mean an A minor chord in the last bar. If you hear an A minor chord over both bars in the bottom line then - by definition - that's the way it is ...


7

A single bassline can be harmonized in a number of different ways. Assuming you are working only with diatonic triads (three note chords that require no accidentals), you'll typically have three options for your harmony for each note. In the key of G major, those options look like this: G: I, vi6, IV64 A: ii, viiĀ°6, V64 B: iii, I6, vi64 C: IV, ii6, ...


7

Key factors (hometheatershack.com) are your woofers' combined surface area; their displacement, achievable low Hz factors and an amplifier capable of delivering the power needs of the speaker configuration. You simply cannot expect this, to do what this does, which makes it feel like this. Behind the bar at the club, you might find racks full of ...


5

Casey Rule gave a fine answer, I just want to point out a few things about harmonizing in general and you should be aware of while trying to harmonize a bass line. iii chords are quite rare in a major key, in fact in all my classical theory studies I don't remember analyzing anything that used any type of iii chord in a major key. While viiĀ° is a viable ...


5

How you describe the harmony (chords) at a point such as the beginning of bar 4, depends upon what any chord symbols are going to be used for. There are in fact several ways to notate the passage you're describing. (For this answer I'm assuming that you do indeed want an Am chord sounding with all the bass notes in bars 3-4). Here are some options: if you ...


5

Although I'm not sure I can identify the mystery set, I have found Fender's stainless-steel flatwounds to have the greatest "mwah" factor. These particular strings (either their medium or light flatwound stainless) are the only kind I like on my fretless Jazz. In addition, one thing you can do to enhance the warmth is to use a dampener either just above or ...


5

I'm turning my comment into an answer: Old roundwounds are most likely the sound you are looking for. Have fun aging them!


5

There is no "have to" in music. There are common patterns and conventions, but the only rule is, if it sounds good, it is good. it doesn't sound out of place at the time ... and therefore it's OK. I have no idea what the implications of this may be if I was to try and apply EQ, or add certain effects, and so on EQ generally has very little effect ...


4

The steps would include. Determining the Key Providing points for Cadences Determining the chords and then there inversions And then finally you write a melody in response to the given notes. Things to note. The proper rules for good melody writing still apply to the bass line you are writing. Try and get the width of the melody an octave. Try to ...


3

I would be careful of how you use the word timbre, which refers to the quality of the sound. There are several embedded questions here, and I will try to address them. Most doubling rules apply to voice-leading, and the treatment of the bass is integral into creating a satisfactory and refined sound. Instead of "accent" I would use the word "emphasize" ...


3

This is not a rigorous, scholarly answer, but a useful one: There is a simple, general principle in writing Western music that has been mentioned by many people over the centuries. It basically says that a piece of music has two important components: the melody up top, and the bass line down low. The chords are determined by filling in the spaces between the ...


3

It really is just a big guitar. The band had some success with a YouTube video of themselves performing the song "Red Hands" in which all 5 of them played one normal-sized guitar. Later they put the same song on YouTube, this time performed on the big guitar. Video In the YouTube description, they write: We found this MASSIVE guitar at a pawn ...


2

I'm not sure that it is possible to generalize that much... First of all, in rock songs, you will find a lot of bands playing with 2 guitarists and 1 bassist. So as @Wheat Williams said, the bass line is often played by the bassist in rock songs. But then, there is usually one lead guitar, who will play a melody line and one rhythm guitar, who can be seen ...


2

A lot of Western music falls into the broad category of primary melody on top, a lot of stuff in the middle, and bass line on bottom. The outside lines--melody and bass--are easiest for our ears to distinguish because they are the lowest and highest boundaries of each vertical slice of harmony. The inner voices are often (but by no means always) less ...


2

Adding to piofusco's comment above, I'll agree that it's sweat which cases the blisters and irritation. An additional option beyond applying something to your hands is to change the strings you're using. Geezer Butler is a big fan of DR's coated strings specifically because he finds them to be very good at wicking sweat from his fingers, eliminating his ...


2

Let me point out a common misconception about your hands. It is moisture/sweat that leads to blisters and irritation. As an experienced rock climber, I have witnessed many new climbers come into the gym and use lotion before a climbing workout. The result - tons of blisters and zero durability. Your hands work best when they are dry, not lubricated. ...


1

Simple answer: 1) Find your places of cadence (a "resting point" within the piece). It looks like bar 8 beat 3 is a good candidate for a cadence. Since your melody falls on E, and since (aside from the unorthodox ending on D at the end) your key is in C major, and since you seem relatively new to harmony, this should be a C major chord or A minor chord; ...


1

First, you need to identify one or two candidate chords -- in a situation like this, you'll probably want to do this for each measure. Try them out on the piano to help you choose between them. For example, when there is a C in the melody, your candidate chords would be C major (I) and A minor (vi). Mostly likely you'll choose C major. Once you've ...


1

I have a few product suggestions. Some are quite unexpected but I have found them effective! Talcum/magnesium/baby powder works fine to keep my hands dry but I naturally have very dry skin so sometimes it's too much and makes my hands feel uncomfortable. It's cheap so you can always try this first. It can used for other body parts as well (against chafing ...


1

This is could be a problem with the pots. I had a similar problem before and removed the scratch plate (or like yours the back plate) and have all the pots changed. I decided to replace all the pots (and not just the one causing the problem) as it was a very old bass and it was likely that the other old pots would sooner or later cause problems as well. ...


1

Not entirely sure what question you're asking, but any octave for a bass note will work. When you're on, say, Am, then frequently the bassist will be playing any of the notes which constitute that chord :A,C and/or E. Certainly at the 1st and 3rd beats of a 4/4 bar - the strongest, usually. The last beat or half beat may stray so that it points to the first ...


1

I want to start my answer by saying: I don't know. This is a very profound question. It does not have a trivial answer. I don't think anyone knows the answer for certain. Because your question isn't just about how Common-Practice Era Western Music Theory Type analysis proceeds. It's about how we think about what a chord is. What is it about how we hear ...


1

Whatever is played by the bassist is called as a bassline. But it is not necessary that what the lead guitar plays is lead. In some Rock bands there are 2 guitarists i.e. 1 that plays lead/solo and the other that plays the rhythm/riff. The rhythm is usually one that involves chords or power chords but it may not necessarily be so i.e. the riff. The lead ...



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