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36

Go for a walk. Count each step, in twos or fours. Tread heavier on the ones. One two One two One two One two One two three four One two three four They feel different, don't they? This is the difference. And yet there is an equivalence between them. Walk at the same tempo, but count to four twice as fast, so you're stepping on the One and the three. One ...


16

"Crotchet" is the British term for quarter note. A "Minim" is a half note and a "quaver" is an eighth note. 3/4 is a time signature. More specifically, it is simple, triple time. The top number in this time signature indicates that there are three beats in each measure. The bottom number (below the slash) means that one beat is defined as a quarter note, ...


15

The other answers are all essentially correct, but I think a critical point is missing. There aren't just fully "strong" and fully "weak" beats; there are also beats of medium strength (and other varieties). 4/4 is emphasized like this: ONE two three four Note the half-accent on the third beat, different from what slim mentioned. If you're playing ...


12

Several things. First and foremost -- I cannot stress this enough -- we express ourselves in the idioms of the music we listen to. If you want to start having more rhythmically interesting inspirations of your own, you need to be filling your ears with rhythmically interesting music. If you're not already doing this, start compiling collections of music ...


9

It is sometimes referred to as a dotted rhythm because the first four notes are all dotted eighth notes. I think it is popular because it's a very easy way to disrupt the normal pulse. Basically, what you are doing is overlaying a pulse that is different from the regular pulse. It works very well as a fill between sections for this same reason. If it ...


7

If a computer plays them, they are the same. However, it may influence how a human player interprets it, even if they don't know anything about what it meant historically, because all those extra beams will make the score look thicker, less spacious, and the notes seem to be more connected. A good player should be able to find a working interpretation ...


7

2/4 is isomorphic to cut time, and as the article excerpt states, they idiomatic french horn rhythm would occur on both of the upbeats in the measure. In other words, the second and fourth eighth notes of a 2/4 bar.


7

It also has to do with strong and weak beats. In 2/4, everyother beat (the one in each measure) is a strong down beat. In 4/4, every fourth beat (the one in each measure) is a strong down beat. It is all about accents and feel, so there is a major difference.


7

When I studied music composition, one of our basic exercises was to compose rhythms without melody. This forces you to develop rhythms that are interesting in their own right. You can then develop the rhythms into melodies, or you can perform them on percussion or by scat singing. Or you can simply use it as an exercise to train your rhythmic composition ...


6

Like everyone else, I would strongly suggest investing in a metronome to keep a consistent beat. In addition, practice counting along with what you are playing. When it comes down to it, though, being able to count a consistent quarter-note (for example) is only a part of the problem, and using a metronome set to the quarter-note will really only ensure ...


6

I think the progression of 2&4 accents in Western (American) popular music probably starts with Swing, Jazz, Big Band where the drummers emphasized these beats and played 2 & 4 with the High Hat. Next I think this moved over to the snare drum in very early Rock n' Roll and Blues. Once it was on the snare drum, virtually all styles of American ...


6

I'm going to aim for simple and scientific here, though I will say melody is far more than I can write here or in any book. There's a minor misunderstanding here, because Melody is the combination of line and rhythm. (and arguably harmony also) The 3 concepts to concern yourself with in a Melody are Line, Rhythm and Harmony Let's remove/ignore harmony to ...


5

I don't play drums but I had a similar experience when I was learning electric guitar. I'm a bit confused about what you imply when you say 'failed' but I'm assuming you mean you just couldn't come up with original, engaging ideas. The truth is, there is no real originality when it comes to music. We can be pretty certain the most good drum lines have been ...


5

As far as I know, the experts say this all has to do with psychology, sensory perception and cognition, and not physiology. This is a question about the intersection of psychology and music, and even the discipline known as "music therapy". There has been a lot of research done on this sort of thing in recent years and a lot of books published on it, but ...


5

If you are playing a song that has four beats in a bar (it's in 4/4 time), you can easily strum on each beat of the bar with a down-strum. By using only down-strums you can play steadily, with an even volume. If you want to play twice as fast (in other words, play eight strums per bar), you can play in between the beats with an up-strum. Your right-hand ...


4

Well, the tiny hairlike structures in your cochlea transmit impulses through the vestibocochlear cranial nerve to your cerebral cortex, then some stuff happens that we don't fully understand yet, but you experience it as sound and link it emotionally to similar experiences in your past. The only real exception I can think of is if the music you are listening ...


4

First of all, you should buy a good metronome. Then practise with the metronome. Start moderately slow and turn it up in small steps. Do this with for some time with different songs/pieces and after a while you will notice that you get better at keeping time. In my experience there are only very few people that are completely "time-deaf".


4

The drumloop you hear on the track that you've mentioned is a chopped/edited version of an 'Amen beat'. Find a refill for Reason with a bunch of REX Amenloops and then mess around. It is common to remove the snare drum and the kick drum from the original loop and add your own kick and snare in place. (This is definitely the case in the song you mentioned). ...


4

Repetitions is zo important in modern music. Just play a very short sequence, over and over until you really get in the groove. Then change a small thing... continue this until you get your new pattern :)


4

If your song is at 83bpm then seeing your metronome at 83bpm will mean you have the right tempo. What I think your question is getting at is starting correctly on the beat, correct? If so, the usual process is to have your metronome started first so you can come in correctly, for example you could let it run for for bars and then jump inti the fifth bar. ...


4

I know a measure contains a certain number beats? Yes. the number of beats is defined by the meter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meter_(music). The time signature is a notational device defines both the meter and the unit that is used to denote the beats of the meter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_signature But could you relate beats with chords and ...


4

Mark Butler has written a scholarly book on Electronic Dance Music called Unlocking the Groove. In it, he proposes calling these moments "turning the beat around", and abbreviated it TBA. As in, "After an introduction that implies a straight 4/4 pattern, a TBA reveals that it has been syncopated all along." Personally, I think it's an unfortunate term, but ...


3

The word also has a descriptive character and is not merely a historically appellation. The beat has a rocking feel because the even accents make it syncopated.


3

You're on the right track, but there are some slight modifications I'd make to what you said. Rhythm is a component of a melody. A melody is a sequence of pitches with certain durations. The duration aspect is the rhythm. But rhythm need not refer to a melody. Because not every musical sound is a melody. (Also, what exactly constitutes a melody vs. a ...


3

It's all about the feel in the music. Sometimes it really doesn't matter, and it is very difficult to say what is more natural. But often you have distinguised beat at the first in each measure. If it is a march, you have the first beat on the right foot when marching to it, and it is natural to have a 2/4. Rock music often has a beat pattern that ...


3

I suggest that you get a good metronome (I like ones with a dial instead of buttons). But don't "start slow and then slowly speed up"! At least not yet. That will be good for new things later on, but first you need to re-learn you existing pieces. And it'll be easier on your nerves to do it at tempo (you've already learned the thing, right?). Instead of ...


3

Some random comments and suggestions: The rhythm by itself is not enough. The sophistication that you describe emerges as an interplay between rhythm, melody, harmony, themes, phrasing and many more, including the form of the whole piece. True, there are engaging percussion-only pieces, but these have their own melody and harmonies, their own structure and ...


3

This is a common phenomenon, based on the fact that - unless there are any other cues - we usually perceive the first note/chord/accent we hear as the '1' of the bar. There are of course a lot of cues (accentuation, melody, etc.) which might tell us otherwise, but is easy to fool the listener. I've encountered many songs/riffs where upon first hearing them I ...


3

Where did this idea originate? West Africa, then transplanted to the New World. It is a defining characteristic of African-American music, and all the styles of music that grew out of and were influenced by African-American music. It then spread to the rest of the world via the 20th-century music of the USA, Cuba, Brazil, Jamaica, and other nations with ...



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