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10

A tip that seems to work for many people when bending while drawing is to "pronounce" (you don't use your voice, just imagine you would) "eeeee" and "ooooo" (English pronunciation) in an alternating fashion, the former corresponding to the normal note and the latter to the bent note. I also found that you need to be sensitive (but that might just be me) to ...


8

Bending notes on a brass instrument without the aid of valves is done by changing the tension, and therefore buzz frequency, of the lips. Quite simply, it's easier to bend notes downward because it's easier to release tension than to create it. Also, as you go up in the harmonic series, the partials get closer together, so on any given note you'll be able ...


6

I think half-valve is the only technique that would be effective. Try to find a valve position that gives you the flexibility. It can involve any number of valves in any position (whatever if they are involved in the start or the end tone). Once you find a position where you can have a rather large range, use that for your drops and falls. In these ...


5

Here's some philosophy on lip slurs. I haven't played this book in particular, but as a brass specialist I can talk about lip flexibility in general; it's the same thing. The ultimate goal of this is to have a clean transition between any two notes in different partials. This is the same whether you are trilling between two partials in a high register very ...


4

Howard Levy Learn about the music of Howard Levy, who recently reunited with Béla Fleck and the Flecktones. Howard plays fully chromatic jazz exclusively on diatonic harmonicas, meaning he can effortlessly bend 7 notes into 12, with perfect intonation. He is the master.


4

Drawing Picture that you are drinking milkshake through a straw that is too thin, on the third hole. Your tongue takes the form of a half-pipe. Then move slowly your tongue towards the back of your mouth, without losing pressure in your mouth. If you can whistle by drawing in air, the feeling is quite alike, but you need more strength to hold the lower ...


4

One thing that will help its to keep the nails on that hand very short, but the technique I use if I must bend a string into or through another is to tilt it back enough that only the fingertip touches the other string, keeping the nail back out of the way. This is relatively easy to practice and pick up.


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the ...


3

If you bend the thin E string, I can't see any other way than that the B and sometimes G string will also follow in the same movement. They are not making a sound since they are not touching the frets. So the tutorial videos are showing the correct way of doing it.


3

It is hard to not touch other strings when you bend, especially if you bend wider than a semitone. The trick here is to mute strings that are not supposed to sound to eliminate unwanted noise instead of trying to not touch them. Some ways to do that are: Mute with the index finger of your fretting (left) hand and use middle and ring fingers to bend. Push ...


2

This must be because you are attempting an overdraw instead of an ordinary bend and are not there yet. You bend the 8th hole down by blowing, not drawing. I think you will experience the same problem if you attempt an overblow on the 4th hole.


2

The fret hand can be very effective at muting the lower adjacent string, as well as all higher strings. For the lower string in your case, position your first (index) finger so that the tip of the finger is slightly touching the string you want to mute. In a good position, the tip of the finger should "butt up against" the string, not press it down. In ...


2

What about an engineer who is into music : ) Lower pitched notes require more air on the harmonia. The "length" of their vibration is also larger (so lower frequency). This means you will be inhaling a greater voume of air to achieve the pressure difference required to reach the bend. This will usually be particularly noticeable on the first hole. Take a ...


1

It's going to depend on the gauge of strings you're using. The heavier gauges will benefit from more / tighter springs (I'm talking about Strat. type whammies here, but think the same process occurs). Even with light gauge strings, a tighter set up will give less movement on the bridge. Even when you've learned to bend properly - take a 'pre-bend as an ...


1

The notation for bending a note is a straight line connecting two notes or going off a note. A curved line, such as shown above, indicates a slur or legato (or phrase mark). Also, considering this is the first exercise of the book, it wouldn't make sense to have a note-bending exercise. This seems more of a warm-up. See this question for examples of what ...


1

If you prefer a demonstration of how muting can be done by a pro, I suggest Eric Johnson's "Total Electric Guitar" video, where he goes through how to do both left hand and right hand muting in detail.


1

To mute all the unwanted noise from other strings, you should use a combination of pick hand and fret hand muting. The pick hand will mute at least all the strings up to two lower than the one you are playing on. It is possible to mute even the next lower string to the one you are playing with the pick hand, but it can be tricky to do this and not mute the ...


1

If you can't control which strings are sounding, it will be very apparent on an electric versus an acoustic guitar. You're probably noticing it when you use the crunch channel because you're getting a bit of compression so even strings that are not sounding "too much" are quite apparent. I always keep my palm near the bridge if not on it so I can stop ...


1

i just palm mute for D and lower. for G and higher, it feels awkward for my picking hand to palm mute the string while picking the higher string im going to bend or release(it seems to be more of a problem, when i quickly release a bend). since i choke up a lot on my pick, i rest the side of my thumb on the lower string i want to keep silent. you might find ...


1

There are two ways to bend a string. One where you pull down and one where you pull up. They both produce the same effect. Try both methods and see if either minimizes the interfecrence with the other strings you are trying to avoid interacting with.


1

If you're bending half to one full note (combined with the right technique and angle approach), you can avoid flickering adjacent string most of the time. It can be harder to achieve consistently on an electric guitar with a lower action, narrow neck, and/or strings with less tension; also when playing fast solo, bending one-and-a-half note, or vibrato ...


1

If you can achieve the bend without touching the D string, doing it very slowly, then you have a chance of practising that motion until you can do it at speed. Doing it slowly, you can experiment with the angle of your fingers, etc. I'm sure your guitar tutor and/or book goes into detail about proper fretting hand position, so I won't repeat it here. If ...


1

Sometimes, the reeds can get slightly bent and catch against the sides of the slot, or little pieces of yuck (food items...) can get caught in there. Most harps are amenable to "soaking"... Simply washing them out. Most can be taken apart and you can see if the reed is physically hanging up on something. Sometimes a tiny tweak is sufficient to put ...



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