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1

Another "trick" you can do is tune down the guitar (I recommend 1 or 1/2 tone, more may require neck adjustments) and use, if you want, a capo; the strings will have less tension and will be easier to bend. You can also experiment alternative tunings, which are usually softer than standard. However, difficult bendings are only a matter of exercise, keep on ...


1

Since it hasn't been mentioned (my apologies if I missed it), I'd like to point out that you can be very effective bending only a 1/2 musical step. Wider bends (like a whole step bend) are also easier near the middle of the string span, rather than down where you are playing open chords. So look for places within the scales of the chords you are playing ...


0

If you're using metal (steel) strings, acoustic strings are generally thicker than electric guitar strings. For that reason, string bending is more common with electric guitarists. The gauge of the string makes a difference in that lighter strings are physically easier to bend (less metal to move about) and are more responsive in that you don't have to bend ...


0

I would change string gauges and see what you think. If sou do decide to do this I would recommend a slight tightening on the truss rod.


4

Bending strings on a steel stringed acoustic guitar can be done to good effect. It works on a nylon stringed too, but is less common. You can try a lighter string gauge to make it easier. Especially steel stringed guitars are usually stringed with pretty brutal gauges. All major string manufacturers have lighter gauge acoustic strings. For nylon stringed ...


2

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


8

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


3

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


3

I'll repeat some of what I mentioned in the comments but I'll elaborate a bit as I have more space here. In my opinion this sounds more like a left hand issue. I do a lot more muting with my left hand, especially during single notes and bends, and only really use my right hand for keeping the lower strings from ringing when playing on the higher strings. ...



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