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53

There are a ton of easy and great-sounding substitutions, and you can use them in the turnaround or anywhere else you want. Here are a few of the most common: ii-V sub: Substitute ii for IV, so that you have a ii-V turnaround. For example, if you're playing in the key of C, the V chord is G7 and the ii chord is Dm7. So instead of C-F-G7, play C-Dm7-G7. ...


18

I think there's an element of pragmatism to this. Some people are out for what they can get, but they also have an eye on what they could lose. Let's say you wrote Stack Exchange Blues, you're collecting royalties from it, and you hear my song Downvotes Got Me Cryin', which you believe steals enough to perhaps warrant a law suit. Well, you're going to have ...


16

Here are quite a few standard substitutions take from page 36 of the free PDF you can download here: http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


13

There seems to be a general confusion here. Everything you can play or imagine is possible. Theory is a means to describe music, but music is by no way bound to any theory whatsoever. Major scales are typically not a good way to describe (or play) Blues. Better suited are scales that are aptly named "blues scales" (see ...


10

You asked "or is this fundamentally just a marketing success?" I think the answer to these sorts of questions always has to take into account the historical background. The Hammond organ came on the market in 1935. It became distinctive because it came first. It was popular and sold in large numbers. It was the first commercially successful electronic ...


10

You confusion is coming from mixing "common practice" harmony theory with pop music. Both of the songs you linked are in the key of D. We know this because the D chord and melody notes clearly have tonic function, meaning they are used as a harmonic "home base", and the other chords played are designed to create a tension that resolves to D. If this was a ...


9

A bass player can easily be the timekeeper for a jazz combo without drums. I'm a bit confused by your question, specifically-- Is it fairly easy to replace substantial portions with improvised walking-bass style lines and still retain the percussive properties of the bass sound? The properties of the timbre are going to be up to your bassist, but on ...


9

Time. It is far better to hit the wrong note at the right time than the right note at the wrong time.


8

The Hammond organ is what is called an analog additive synthesizer (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Additive_synthesis) and it works by adding together sine waves that are multiples of the base frequency. A sine wave alone sounds like a whistle or a dull flute, but the more you add up the more interesting the sound can get. The Hammond organ features ...


8

To answer the question: "Where does the line between what is acceptable to call plagiarism and musical "style" come in to play?" I have to say that unfortunately, pragmatically, it comes down to what you as a plaintiff can prove in court. It really does come down to the law. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and I am not giving any legal advice, which in any ...


8

A lot of blues numbers are built around the 12-bar sequence. This is, in its simplest form, I I I I IV IV I I V IV I V. Put this in, say, C,and the chord sequence is four bars of C, two bars of F, two bars of C, one of G, one of F, one of C, and the turnaround chord of G. Each of these sounds more bluesy with the added b7. So the first C7 chord will contain ...


8

That notation (1 b3 4 b5 5 b7) is used to relate a scale to the major (ionian) scale. It shows which scale degrees should be flattened or sharpened (and by how much) relative to the major scale. So, you should start with E major scale, not E minor or E phrygian (natural notes from E to E: E F G A B C D). E major scale is of course 1=E 2=F# 3=G# 4=A 5=B 6=C# ...


8

12 bar blue sequences - poffle.com shows at least a dozen. The blues sequence doesn't have to be 12 bars long, it's just that this is the commonest. 8 and 16 are other well used ones. Basically putting 7ths onto each chord will help to bluesify a sequence. Or 9ths, which sound more jazzy. A lot of varieties use 'passing' chords such as diminished to get from ...


7

A chromatic scale is a scale starting at the root note where every note on the scale is a semi-tone apart. On a piano if you were to start at one note and hit every key up to the octave, you'd have a chromatic scale. Example: C Chromatic: C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C D Chromatic D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D E Chromatic E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E ...


7

Listening to some Ali Farka Toure in order to have something fresh in my head to comment. First, I'd say that the 12-bar progression we're all familiar with is absent, replaced with repeating measures that are more a part of funk, although the blues history videos seem to tie to John Lee Hooker. You don't get the familiar shuffle, either, and I'm actually ...


7

This question comes across as a shopping recommendation, but since we don't do those on Music.se I'm going to stop short of recommending specific books. Blues is a broad genre of music -- for example the Chicago Blues of Howlin' Wolf is quite different from the Delta Blues of Leadbelly or the Texas Blues of Stevie Ray Vaughan. We don't know which of those ...


7

Are you asking how to learn blues guitar or how to explain to people that you want to learn blues guitar? Your question seems to be asking the latter, but your title suggests the former. When most people lump guitar playing into classical and rock; or classical, rock, and folk; they are not really making a distinction between the musical styles as much as ...


6

There's a very good YouTube based instructor named Justin Sandercoe. He has a huge collection of lessons and resources available including many that are focused on the blues. All of his material is free, though there is some available for purchase.


6

Since the comments ask for a more complete answer from me, I'm going to give it a shot. Most people I know call this technique double stops. In the case of Soul Man, the double stops are mostly based on a 6th interval, starting with a (sorta) outline of an E7: |-----4----2-2----7---9---11---12-| |---------------------------------| ...


6

The number one thing you should worry about is developing your ear. That's probably 70% - 80% of a professional musician. So... Transcribe songs you like (and some you don't) and practice them, especially the parts that give you a hard time. Use a metronome for songs that are too fast. Play them slow and gradually increase speed.


6

Like Tim said, these two genres are really close; there are jazz musicians that play the blues and blues musicians that play the jazz. Usually, the difference is found in the chords. Someone could characterize blues as more 'simple' (without diminishing the genre); a simple blues would have a progression like C7 C7 C7 C7 F7 F7 C7 C7 G7 G7 C7 C7 And ...


6

Just to add to these answers, a blues walking bass line tends to me much more repetitive and pattern oriented. They're much more likely to play the same major pentatonic pattern over the progression throughout the whole tune. For Jazz, the lines tend to be more improvisational, different every time around and moving more with the music rather than having a ...


5

The short answer is, no, blues doesn't require a thumb pick. The blues is a broad class of music, played on all kinds of instruments, in all kinds of ways. The longer answer is, that it depends what sound you want. If you want the sound you get from a thumb pick, then a thumb pick is probably the best way of getting it! I suggest you don't attempt ...


5

No. The F and G are heard as the subdominant and dominant of the home key. When listening you have the sense of being away from the C chord and wanting to return to it. A modulation sets up a new home key. It can be temporary (like a vacation home) or permanent (like moving to a new home, for instance the modulation just before the last chorus of "Grandma ...


5

The order might vary, but usually it is arranged so you get the ones that you will use the most first, but it doesn't really matter. You can google pages and pages that have fingerings for these. One benefit we have with a stringed instrument is that there are patterns and shapes that each scale makes. The shape you learn for one major scale is the same for ...


5

You don't need to buy a new guitar - any acoustic, classical or flamenco guitar will be fine. If you are an experienced flamenco guitarist you will already have the ability to pick the strings and notes you want, so the difference is going to be mostly about the feel of the music. Both flamenco and blues are very emotional styles, but where flamenco can be ...


5

Fingerstyle blues is very satisfying; it's about 80% of what I do. I always recommend the same first step for the aspiring blues player...Listen to the blues. Go to the masters. Go to YouTube and listen to the old Delta and Chicago and Texas bluesmen that were responsible for inventing the style. Robert Johnson, Skip James, Mississippi John Hurt, Muddy ...


5

The Hammond B3 is by far the Blues organist's instrument of choice. Why? Hammond organ is the first electronic organ that uses "mechanical tonewheels that rotate in front of electromagnetic pickups." Yes, all the additive synthesis stuff is important but more importantly is how it is implemented by mechanical means, and uses 'drawbars' to mix and blend the ...


5

The term "Rhythm and Blues" or "R&B" was coined by Jerry Wexler (who went on to be a famous record company executive and producer) when he was working as a journalist at Billboard Magazine, circa 1952. (Wikipedia link). Billboard published a weekly chart displaying their estimates of the relative position of retail sales of single recordings which were ...



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