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18

I think there's an element of pragmatism to this. Some people are out for what they can get, but they also have an eye on what they could lose. Let's say you wrote Stack Exchange Blues, you're collecting royalties from it, and you hear my song Downvotes Got Me Cryin', which you believe steals enough to perhaps warrant a law suit. Well, you're going to have ...


8

A lot of blues numbers are built around the 12-bar sequence. This is, in its simplest form, I I I I IV IV I I V IV I V. Put this in, say, C,and the chord sequence is four bars of C, two bars of F, two bars of C, one of G, one of F, one of C, and the turnaround chord of G. Each of these sounds more bluesy with the added b7. So the first C7 chord will contain ...


8

To answer the question: "Where does the line between what is acceptable to call plagiarism and musical "style" come in to play?" I have to say that unfortunately, pragmatically, it comes down to what you as a plaintiff can prove in court. It really does come down to the law. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and I am not giving any legal advice, which in any ...


8

12 bar blue sequences - poffle.com shows at least a dozen. The blues sequence doesn't have to be 12 bars long, it's just that this is the commonest. 8 and 16 are other well used ones. Basically putting 7ths onto each chord will help to bluesify a sequence. Or 9ths, which sound more jazzy. A lot of varieties use 'passing' chords such as diminished to get from ...


8

That notation (1 b3 4 b5 5 b7) is used to relate a scale to the major (ionian) scale. It shows which scale degrees should be flattened or sharpened (and by how much) relative to the major scale. So, you should start with E major scale, not E minor or E phrygian (natural notes from E to E: E F G A B C D). E major scale is of course 1=E 2=F# 3=G# 4=A 5=B 6=C# ...


6

Just to add to these answers, a blues walking bass line tends to me much more repetitive and pattern oriented. They're much more likely to play the same major pentatonic pattern over the progression throughout the whole tune. For Jazz, the lines tend to be more improvisational, different every time around and moving more with the music rather than having a ...


6

Like Tim said, these two genres are really close; there are jazz musicians that play the blues and blues musicians that play the jazz. Usually, the difference is found in the chords. Someone could characterize blues as more 'simple' (without diminishing the genre); a simple blues would have a progression like C7 C7 C7 C7 F7 F7 C7 C7 G7 G7 C7 C7 And ...


5

I would say that the basic idea of the (12 bar) blues is this: 4 bars with the feel of I: Could be as simple as I | I | I | I, or as complex as I | vii III7 | vi | II7 | v I7 (notice that in the important places, the harmonic onbeats, the chords are I, and vi (the relative minor), giving the feel of I even though that chord doesn't appear much. 4 bars, 2 ...


5

To be clear, a blues progression is called a I7 IV7 V7 progression rather than I IV V which implies diatonic chords (in Bb that would be Bb major, Eb major, F7). Blues progressions actually do not conform to standard western musical harmony, you are correct by saying that improvisations will sound strange when playing diatonic major modes over the ...


4

This is a really subjective question. If you like playing on a 5 string bass then by all means get a 5 string bass. You might even want to try a 6 string before making that decision. Use however many strings you are comfortable with. There really isn't an absolute answer. Any number of strings is good for any kind of music. In any standard configurations, ...


4

We could go the way of Charley Patton's "Hammer Blues" .... | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | Or Skip James' "Cypress Grove Blues" ... | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 5m7 / / / | X / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / ...


4

The crossover between jazz and blues is very blurred. Some tracks are impossible to pigeonhole - apart from saying they're jazz/blues. A walking bass is a walking bass, moving often 4 in the bar from one chord tone to the next appropriate chord tone, usually climbing up or down scale notes with chromatics when needed. I guess that as blues tends to use ...


3

Folk, country and blues draw on what is called "the oral tradition". Song "families" have always been part of the oral tradition, and building on -- even re-using -- pre-existing harmonic/melodic structures was/is common practice in those genres. Artists in those genres just kind of "get" that's the case. In the oral tradition, there was no concept of ...


3

The sequences you've listed are extremely common, but there are thousands of variations that you could still call blues. So many, that it becomes futile to try and "collect" them. Just listen to lots of blues, listen to the chords and learn to spot the different sequences. One example "Going Back Home" by Dr Feelgood: | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / ...


3

It will depend to a degree on what the instruments are, and how advanced the player is.On piano/keyboard, it's quite easy to play both parts.On guitar, which is,I guess, what you play, it's not easy.Especially in C. You may well be able to transpose the key to E, using E,A and B(7). Or A, using A,D and E.That way, at least, you can put a bass pattern in on ...


3

This is an interesting summary of the whole George Harrison My Sweet Lord/He's So Fine plagiarism case, with some discussion of the legal issues involved: http://abbeyrd.best.vwh.net/mysweet.htm Of course, there are many examples of legal plagiarism of classical tunes. To name three: "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" was taken from the middle of Chopin's ...


3

Caleb already gave some great tips, but I have some more specific advice that might help. In my opinion the single best thing you can do to get better at translating what is in your head to what comes out of your guitar is playing along with records and learning songs by ear. This is a form of ear training in a way, but it is more about being able to hear ...


3

There really are no major limits for playing anything in any key on piano. Certain players are more familiar and comfortable with certain keys, but it is possible for a pianist to play in any key. It's all just a matter of practice. The only minor stumbling block is the fingering of a piece may change with the key.


2

No, you don't need more than one player for the blues, as a lot of recordings show. Just playing the chords one time through will make most people recognize the tune form. If you would then solo using the C, F and G blues scales, changing scale where the chords change, people would still recognize the tune form. Adding the chords at different places in your ...


2

You could call it a V-V-V with key changes, a IV-IV-IV , or whatever. The fact is that in a blues progression there are no key changes or modulations in a particular verse. The chords are related to each other,so in key A, with I, IV and V, it becomes A, D and E. Blues traditionally uses dominant 7th chords to get the 'feel', rather than a 7th just on the V ...


2

In a standard 12-bar I-IV-V blues progression (here in F) ||: F7 | F7 | F7 | F7 | | Bb7 | Bb7 | F7 | F7 | | C7 | Bb7 | F7 | C7 :|| there are three places where you should start trying to incorporate the diminished scale: bar 4, where the F7 chord can be interpreted as a dominant chord resolving to Bb7. Here you can add tension by using the half-whole ...


2

Consider the half whole diminished scale: R b9 b3 3 #4 5 6 b7 R All notes except one are very commonly used in blues soloing. the inclusion of both the b3 and 3 gives the essence of blues (mixing major and minor). The 'blues note' (b5/#4) is there. All of the chord tones are there. The 6 is there. So it suits blues very well. Try these over a dominant ...


2

There are two diminished scales, the half/whole and the whole/half. This translates ,in C,as C,Db, Eb, E, F#,G, A, Bb, for the first, as it jumps semitone/tone, etc. The other works starting with C, D, Eb etc.Both work best over a diminished chord. I have used note names as they came, not particularly accurately. To fit into a solo, one way is to look at a ...


2

You don't say how much musical knowledge you have away from piano. I play guitar, I've never studied piano and I don't own a keyboard instrument. But I can play bluesy stuff on the piano no problem. Here's a bluffer's guide to playing blues in the key of Am/C which is of course the easiest key to play on piano. Right hand: Blues scale A C D Eb E G. the Eb ...


2

This is a complicated topic, but I think it all boils down to conditioning and what listeners like to hear. There are many ways to harmonize a melody, yet most people use predictable chord progressions because they're easy to follow, work with, and understand. Jazz is a form of music that is very alienating to non-musicians. I'm certain there are countless ...


2

Yes, after repeated listening, NReilingh is undoubtedly correct. The riff I was after is more like this: $3.17 $2.16 $3.17 $2.16 $1.15 15 $2.16 $3.17 All sweeps. Or sweep-arpeggios.


2

One part of the distinctive Hammond organ sound in rock/jazz is the use of a Leslie speaker cabinet. In my opinion, it is also the reason that Hammond organs were becoming less popular for mainstream music requiring big PAs and selling and broadcasting recordings. Because a Leslie speaker cannot be faithfully reproduced or simulated with reasonable effort. ...


2

Just start doing it. Obvious starting point is to just play around with the blues scale.


2

In most cases the C minor blues scale is exactly what you want. The ins and outs of this differ depending on the exact style you are trying to convey. You could play the C minor blues scale instead You could play the F major blues scale over the F chords, and the G Major blues scale over the G chords. Try both of these and see how they suit you. The ...


2

"Without resorting to the C minor blues scale, how do I improvise over a I-IV-V progression using the C Major blues when the F is not in the scale?" Simply put, you don't. If anyone can find a single example of the major blues scale of the keynote being used over an entire I IV V I will gladly eat my hat. It is quite different to the usage of the ...



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