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12

That blues note is nebulous. It can be, and is, anywhere between a minor 3 and a major 3. Listen to blues players, and you'll hear it bent fully from min. to maj., or just hinted at with a tiny flick from minor upwards. The listener probably completes the bend in his mind's ear. It sometimes gets played as a straight major that gets wobbled down to minor and ...


9

What you probably mean by minor and major blues scales are the two following scales (with root C): C Eb F Gb G Bb (minor blues) C D Eb E G A (major blues) These are just the minor and major pentatonic scales with one note added. The minor pentatonic scale gets a b5 (Gb), and the major pentatonic scale gets a b3 (Eb), both to make those pentatonic scales ...


9

Tim is correct that it's about the 3rd, 5th, and 7th, but I don't agree that in the blues they are flattened by exactly one semi-tone. That is an approximation when writing down the notes or when playing them on a piano, but on any instrument on which in-between notes can be played, these notes will be intonated differently. Especially the 3rd and the 7th ...


8

The archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on guitar as a pseudo-pentatonic something like this (C tonic): C a 'window' around Eb, covering the range down to D and up to E. F, bending up a little (maybe not as far as Gb) G Bb, with scope to bend up a little ...


6

A look over the Blue Note article on Wikipedia that Shevliaskovic linked talks a bit about the tuning theory behind Blue Notes, so I'd like to expand on that, as you mentioned wanting a "Mathematical" definition of these notes. The article states that in order to overcome tuning hardships in keyboard creation in the 18th century, Equal Temperament was ...


6

Blues is a language, with grammar and vocabulary. The difference between learning to play the blues and learning to play a blues is the same as the difference between learning to speak a language and learning just some words or phrases in that language. In the vocabulary instead of words you are using scales and chords. In the grammar instead of order of ...


5

The so called 'blue note' has it's roots in the African immigrants in the States. Back in Africa, they didn't have the piano to tune their voices to, so they sung what they liked best. When they came to the Western World, they found out the piano (and other instruments of course) and they learned to play it. When they begun to sing the blues, songs based ...


5

I believe that the oft-cited analogy with learning a language is quite to the point. You need to learn (i.e., copy) words, phrases, and simple sentences, and after a lot of practice you will be able to form your own sentences and express what you want to convey. You can speed up that process from copying to self-expression by total immersion, i.e. by ...


4

In addition to traditional Blues being simpler and less diverse than Jazz, historically Blues is played in smaller groups, or even solo, and more often by musicians who learn and play by ear. In that sense (and in others) it feels a lot closer to Rock 'n Roll than to Jazz. I would say Blues is more of an oral tradition, and Jazz is more composed in a similar ...


4

Blues songs, by definition, basically, follow the blues progression as found in 12 bar blues. Whilst there are lots of variants of the 12 bar blues, they are basically the same format. The fake (or real) book would be rather thin due to this. Yes, there are other songs which come under the auspices of 'blues', but in comparison to jazz standards, they are ...


4

I don't have a scientific answer, but I guess you could say that blues isn't exactly an adrenaline-filled music. Punk,rock, metal etc are kinds of music that makes you feel hyped and alive. They are the kind of music that makes you want to be standing and jump or run or whatever. Blues (and Jazz) although, is the kind of laid back enjoyment. You sit on the ...


4

It's just a passing chord on the way to Gm7 from F. From Gm7 to E7 the D is common and the other notes are moving chromatically to get to Gm7. If you look at the notes each contain you'll see: F -> E -> F A -> G# -> G C -> B -> Bb C -> D -> D You'll notice the chromatic descending line in A to G and C to Bb and The F - E - F ...


4

First of all, Dm7 has no B but a C (as already pointed out in a comment by Tim): Dm7: D F A C The D minor pentatonic scale clearly fits over a Dm7 chord, because it contains all chord tones and it adds one note (the G), which is a cool-sounding tension on Dm7 (the 11). Note that the D minor pentatonic scale is not the only pentatonic scale you can play ...


3

Instead of learning the "best" or "correct" fingering for every different scale, I think it's better to learn some general principles, and then work out the details for yourself. The repeated pattern of fingers is 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 - but not necessarily starting on 1, because .... Don't use your thumb on the black keys. With the right hand, use your thumb on ...


3

I thought that the flattened notes in Blues were the 3rd, 5th and 7th. However, they're traditionally taken to the next semitone down, as in C, E to Eb, G to Gb and B to Bb. That puts them squarely on the notes mentioned, rather than 'just a bit flat', which may be what's mentioned here. The same three notes are sometimes hinted at, particularly on ...


3

What people usually mean by "blues scale" is the scale that you already knew, i.e. a minor pentatonic scale with an added b5 ("blue note"). What the author of that book refers to as blues scale is actually more like a collection of notes, all of which can be used over a blues progression. The difference with the standard blues scale is that not all of those ...


3

There are minor blues as well. They will use i iv and V (or i7 iv7 and V7 for 'real' blues). As you state, I(7) IV(7) and V(7) are more usual, but the same 12 bar format is often used for a possibly more miserable (!) blues. This, though, is not a standard 12 bar. The bridge goes to the relative major of iv, a common trick in minor blues. The V is usually ...


3

If you are playing solo, start by realizing that you are now the full band and you need to adapt your playing like so. Think of the drummer and the bass player as "navigators" on a ship, guiding the rest of the group. So the drummer keeps time and makes fills anticipating when a period is ending and another one is beginning and the bass player plays passing ...


2

There's nothing wrong with using your little finger however the other 3 are much stronger and (especially as SRV used strings that were really fat) he may be more comfortable like that. I remember slash saying in an interview he often used only 3 fingers on give a bluesy sound to his solos. So I guess its just about comfort and preference.


2

So an F blues refers to the song form over which you'll need to improvise. The good news is, if you know how to improvise on a blues scale, your work is largely done for you. There are infinite ways to improvise over a blues form, but one of the simplest ways that's also very effective is to use the blues scale. So in this case you would use the F minor ...


2

Short answer: C/F-G Long answer: In the key of G-major he's playing IV-I in the right hand (which sounds like a plagal cadence, though it's not strictly cadential) with b7-1 scale degree motion in the left hand. He's also ornamented these chords with an appogiatura consisting of D-E leading into the F of the first chord, and similarly with #2-3 for the ...


2

It's still a type of I-IV-V progression, you're just in a minor key (D minor) instead of a major key (F major). The VI-II-III in actuality is a i(Dm)-iv(Gm)-V(A7). There's more then one flavor of blues progressions and this one is derived from typical minor blues progression patternes.


2

The problem with answering the question "what notes are in the blues scale" is that the archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges, so any attempt at defining a blues scale in terms of the 12-note scale is only going to be an approximation. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on the guitar as a ...


2

Two blues scales exist generally. Minor blues as in C, Eb, F, Gb, G, Bb. Major blues as in C, D, Eb, E, G, A. Often players will mix the sets of notes in their playing. The minor blues is probably used more in guitar playing, due to the pattern of notes easily found because of the way guitars are tuned. The whole solo in Stevie Wonder's Sir Duke is major ...


2

There seem to be crossed wires here, with respect. Blues progressions basically use 3 chords, I, IV and V. True, often dominant 7ths, but that needn't muddy the water for now. There is a recognized order to the sequence. Actually, almost any notes can be (and are) used to create solos over these sequences. It's just that lots of the time, guitarists in ...


2

Yes. The last 4 are definitely a blues turnaround. Limited to I IV and V chords is consistent. In fact I can't seem to play it without making it bluesy. But I also agree with @herman's answer. The ear is the true judge. Since it is so short, it could even be just a phrase in a larger lyrical structure. If you play it in 2/4, with a Motown kinda beat... ...


2

There are many variations possible on the 8 bar blues, so this could certainly be one. I'd say it depends on the tune: does it sound bluesy?


2

There's one major concept missing from this discussion: What are your ears hearing you play over this blues progression? When you play/practice this blues are you able to hear a melody or theme that you would like to be able to play from your instrument? If not, who do you listen to that would play what you want to hear? Understanding scales and their ...


2

When you are playing solo, like Hooker is here, you can take great advantage of tempo rubato. It literally means "stolen time", and it's when you move faster or slower than normal in certain areas without completely abandoning a rhythm. It's very common for solo blues musician to play with this style, partly because they can, since they don't have to keep ...


2

A couple of additional notes that might help answer your question: The "blues scale" was developed to to play one set of notes over all the chords in a twelve bar blues, so the blues scale based on A minor pentatonic is played over a twelve bar blues starting on A7, even though the major third does not technically occur in the scale (this is why chords with ...



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