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8

Minor pent works well over major chords, but not vice versa. Add the 'blue' note to both maj. and min. pents for a little spice. Try the full major scale notes on major songs. Try the full minor scales (3 of them!) on minor songs. Use the Mixolydian mode for major songs. Use the Dorian mode for minor songs. Use the Lydian mode for major songs. On major songs ...


5

I believe that the oft-cited analogy with learning a language is quite to the point. You need to learn (i.e., copy) words, phrases, and simple sentences, and after a lot of practice you will be able to form your own sentences and express what you want to convey. You can speed up that process from copying to self-expression by total immersion, i.e. by ...


4

It's just a passing chord on the way to Gm7 from F. From Gm7 to E7 the D is common and the other notes are moving chromatically to get to Gm7. If you look at the notes each contain you'll see: F -> E -> F A -> G# -> G C -> B -> Bb C -> D -> D You'll notice the chromatic descending line in A to G and C to Bb and The F - E - F ...


4

First of all, Dm7 has no B but a C (as already pointed out in a comment by Tim): Dm7: D F A C The D minor pentatonic scale clearly fits over a Dm7 chord, because it contains all chord tones and it adds one note (the G), which is a cool-sounding tension on Dm7 (the 11). Note that the D minor pentatonic scale is not the only pentatonic scale you can play ...


3

In the end you can use pretty much any arbitrary scales, switch between them and still sound awesome, as long as there's tasteful structure to it. For example if the song is currently in E minor, try putting in some phrases in D, F, F# or G major diatonic scales, but regularly return to the familiar Em pentatonic. My general advice would be to listen to ...


3

~The Chorus~ Chorus is awesome! Thanks to its over use in the 1960's, it's sound can make a whole song sound bluesy. The Walrus Audio Julia is the best chorus that I know of and is also the most vintage sounding, which is essential for a chorus to sound bluesy. ~The overdrive~ A light overdrive is all you need for jazz :). Not too much drive to kill the ...


3

If you are playing solo, start by realizing that you are now the full band and you need to adapt your playing like so. Think of the drummer and the bass player as "navigators" on a ship, guiding the rest of the group. So the drummer keeps time and makes fills anticipating when a period is ending and another one is beginning and the bass player plays passing ...


3

There are minor blues as well. They will use i iv and V (or i7 iv7 and V7 for 'real' blues). As you state, I(7) IV(7) and V(7) are more usual, but the same 12 bar format is often used for a possibly more miserable (!) blues. This, though, is not a standard 12 bar. The bridge goes to the relative major of iv, a common trick in minor blues. The V is usually ...


2

There's one major concept missing from this discussion: What are your ears hearing you play over this blues progression? When you play/practice this blues are you able to hear a melody or theme that you would like to be able to play from your instrument? If not, who do you listen to that would play what you want to hear? Understanding scales and their ...


2

A few points that I think need to be added, as they may well be the overwhelming factors in answering the "what's special about a Hammond." First, as compared to a pipe organ: Pipe organs do not "speak" quickly enough for most popular music. (That is, the initial attack of each note that is played takes too long.) Classical organists adjust their technique ...


2

When you are playing solo, like Hooker is here, you can take great advantage of tempo rubato. It literally means "stolen time", and it's when you move faster or slower than normal in certain areas without completely abandoning a rhythm. It's very common for solo blues musician to play with this style, partly because they can, since they don't have to keep ...


2

It's #2: the BBF songs are all variations on some widely-used blues changes, and Guthrie used the same one. It's often called the "Five Chord Ragtime" progression because it's built around a five-chord sequence of fifths (I-VI7-II7-V7-I). Here it is in C: C---A7---D7-G7-C--- C---A7---D7---G7--- C---C7---F---Ab7--- C---A7---D7-G7-C--- Not only was it ...


2

Been there. Done that. I'll try to describe what my experiences have been. I rarely got to practice a accompaniment; usually I'd step in at the last minute for a rehearsal or someone would want to sing and they would ask me to accompany. You've got a good start by knowing some theory (classical, jazz, etc. are useful.) That means you know the general ...


2

Without wanting to sound too abstract, I'd recommend learning guitar solos from musicians you enjoy listening too, then try to copy their ideas into your own improvisation. I think what is key is developing your "musical ear" where you can hear in your head what you want to play and know how to translate that onto the guitar. This takes many years of ...


2

The transposer MIDI plug-in seems to be able to restrict to a blues scale.


2

A couple of additional notes that might help answer your question: The "blues scale" was developed to to play one set of notes over all the chords in a twelve bar blues, so the blues scale based on A minor pentatonic is played over a twelve bar blues starting on A7, even though the major third does not technically occur in the scale (this is why chords with ...


1

Scales tend to reflect reality. It's not that someone once came up with a theory from thin air. Notes that sound good together get put together in ascending/descending order to be called scales. To an extent it's what humans do. Then players can think along the lines of 'if I want that sound, I can use that set of notes and it'll largely work'. The Blues ...


1

It looks like the chorus in Lenny is an example of parallel harmony or parallelism. The first chord (the A6) is repeated with different root notes, but otherwise with the exact same intervals and even the same voicing. Arguably the modern godfather of parallelism is Claude Debussy. When asked by his teacher about the "theory" of parallelism, Debussy replied,...


1

Tonal harmony does provide some ways to further develop harmonic patterns in blues, but with some specificities. The secondary dominant is a concept borrowed from classical harmony that's widely used in jazz blues. This may be taken an additional step further with the commonly used in Jazz ii-V-I progression. So, for a basic 12 bar blues progression I I ...


1

I can relate. Piano is not my main instrument (I am most proficient on guitar). So here is what I would do to keep it super simple - yet effective. I would use the left hand to play the root notes of the chords in the chord progression (12 barre blues probably works for at least two of those songs). I would play them as an octave in unison. Or the full ...


1

You need to know the chords for each song. The first two are basically 12-bar blues. "This Train" uses the same simple chords but in a slightly different order. Google the song name + "chords" to check them out. Now the hard bit. You really have to do these songs in the keys that best suit the voices. You mustn't make them stretch for notes that are too ...


1

I would say it's definitely a blues. The chord progression is a typical blues progression, as you say. The melody as well. It also has a typical "boogie" pattern in the left hand, and the typical blues "turnaround" (the last two bars of every chorus). Granted, it is not a 12 bar blues with the classic repeat of the first line (AAB form), but the 8 bar ...


1

Learn different two-handed voicings for the chords. Different inversions, different ways to voice the same chord. Pick up a copy of the "Piano Transcriptions" / "Piano comping" for one of the Jamey Aebersold play alongs. (Go to www.jazzbooks.com and in the search bar type those two search terms.) These are the note-for-note transcriptions of the piano ...


1

Two good references: Blues Scales: Essential Tools for Jazz Improvisation. by Dan Greenblatt Tony Monaco's online "Blues" video lessons. A very important thing for you to realize is: pick any scale (pentatonic or otherwise, blues or otherwise). As long as you create a logical, meaningful solo in that scale, it will work, and the scale doesn't have to ...


1

As you've already found out, the A minor pentatonic scale - or, if you add the flat 5 = Eb, the A blues scale - fits all three chords. But your solos can indeed be made more interesting if you add more notes. You can use chord tones to spice up your solo and to incorporate the changes into your melodies. Below are the chord tones that are not already part ...


1

Use the notes from A pent min. and A pent maj. while the progression is on A. You may even use the min. and maj. blues scale notes - one extra for each. These obviously work over D and E (you already use them!) but better to use the pents or blues of D over the D bars and E over the E bars. We have discussed similar in other answers. Basically there are ...


1

I think all the comments here are useful and accurate; I'd like to add one from the standpoint of pure timbral analysis. The B3 has a distinctive "percussion" setting that adds a short burst of either the second or third harmonic to the start of the note. It's polyphonic, so playing a chord will get percussion on every note, but single-triggering, so ...



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