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10

That blues note is nebulous. It can be, and is, anywhere between a minor 3 and a major 3. Listen to blues players, and you'll hear it bent fully from min. to maj., or just hinted at with a tiny flick from minor upwards. The listener probably completes the bend in his mind's ear. It sometimes gets played as a straight major that gets wobbled down to minor and ...


8

12 bar blue sequences - poffle.com shows at least a dozen. The blues sequence doesn't have to be 12 bars long, it's just that this is the commonest. 8 and 16 are other well used ones. Basically putting 7ths onto each chord will help to bluesify a sequence. Or 9ths, which sound more jazzy. A lot of varieties use 'passing' chords such as diminished to get from ...


8

That notation (1 b3 4 b5 5 b7) is used to relate a scale to the major (ionian) scale. It shows which scale degrees should be flattened or sharpened (and by how much) relative to the major scale. So, you should start with E major scale, not E minor or E phrygian (natural notes from E to E: E F G A B C D). E major scale is of course 1=E 2=F# 3=G# 4=A 5=B 6=C# ...


7

The archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on guitar as a pseudo-pentatonic something like this (C tonic): C a 'window' around Eb, covering the range down to D and up to E. F, bending up a little (maybe not as far as Gb) G Bb, with scope to bend up a little ...


6

Just to add to these answers, a blues walking bass line tends to me much more repetitive and pattern oriented. They're much more likely to play the same major pentatonic pattern over the progression throughout the whole tune. For Jazz, the lines tend to be more improvisational, different every time around and moving more with the music rather than having a ...


6

Like Tim said, these two genres are really close; there are jazz musicians that play the blues and blues musicians that play the jazz. Usually, the difference is found in the chords. Someone could characterize blues as more 'simple' (without diminishing the genre); a simple blues would have a progression like C7 C7 C7 C7 F7 F7 C7 C7 G7 G7 C7 C7 And ...


5

I suspect the confusion might be in what "Blues" means: Blues is a comment on the feel of a piece of music, rather than necessarily its structure. It's very common of course for blues songs to use the 12-bar chord progression (which is thought to have arisen from slaves singing while working in America), but not exclusively. Exceptions: For eaxmple "Need ...


5

I would say that the basic idea of the (12 bar) blues is this: 4 bars with the feel of I: Could be as simple as I | I | I | I, or as complex as I | vii III7 | vi | II7 | v I7 (notice that in the important places, the harmonic onbeats, the chords are I, and vi (the relative minor), giving the feel of I even though that chord doesn't appear much. 4 bars, 2 ...


5

The so called 'blue note' has it's roots in the African immigrants in the States. Back in Africa, they didn't have the piano to tune their voices to, so they sung what they liked best. When they came to the Western World, they found out the piano (and other instruments of course) and they learned to play it. When they begun to sing the blues, songs based ...


4

This is a really subjective question. If you like playing on a 5 string bass then by all means get a 5 string bass. You might even want to try a 6 string before making that decision. Use however many strings you are comfortable with. There really isn't an absolute answer. Any number of strings is good for any kind of music. In any standard configurations, ...


4

The crossover between jazz and blues is very blurred. Some tracks are impossible to pigeonhole - apart from saying they're jazz/blues. A walking bass is a walking bass, moving often 4 in the bar from one chord tone to the next appropriate chord tone, usually climbing up or down scale notes with chromatics when needed. I guess that as blues tends to use ...


4

We could go the way of Charley Patton's "Hammer Blues" .... | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | Or Skip James' "Cypress Grove Blues" ... | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | | 5m7 / / / | X / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / ...


4

A look over the Blue Note article on Wikipedia that Shevliaskovic linked talks a bit about the tuning theory behind Blue Notes, so I'd like to expand on that, as you mentioned wanting a "Mathematical" definition of these notes. The article states that in order to overcome tuning hardships in keyboard creation in the 18th century, Equal Temperament was ...


3

While teachers and self-study are excellent ways to learn anything, when it comes to learning the blues, I believe you can profit greatly by finding someone who is just a little bit better than you, and just sit down and play together. While the form has evolved over time to embrace real sophistication, it started as a type of folk music. Playing three ...


3

I agree with Tim's answer, but I'd like to add that you shouldn't think of it as changing chords. What you're doing (i.e. playing this on two strings) is actually correct and it's not like 'getting away' with something, but that's all that's to it. It's a line imposed over a chord: the chord is a dominant seventh chord (i.e. in a basic blues either the I7, ...


3

There really are no major limits for playing anything in any key on piano. Certain players are more familiar and comfortable with certain keys, but it is possible for a pianist to play in any key. It's all just a matter of practice. The only minor stumbling block is the fingering of a piece may change with the key.


3

Caleb already gave some great tips, but I have some more specific advice that might help. In my opinion the single best thing you can do to get better at translating what is in your head to what comes out of your guitar is playing along with records and learning songs by ear. This is a form of ear training in a way, but it is more about being able to hear ...


3

Yes! While blues often deals in hardship, that’s not universal. Early blues were often comical or raunchy. Songs like Led Zeppelin’s “The Lemon Song” continue that tradition. And some blues are downright joyous like Stevie Ray Vaghan’s “Pride and Joy,” or pure fun like the old standard “Jump Jive and Wail.” The common thread in blues is that it’s very ...


3

This is not meant to be harsh in any way, I'm just examining possibilities… We start from not knowing what you actually do sound like. Presumably, as you can play an instrument, you can also hit roughly the right note when singing [though it's not a guarantee, it's a fair bet]. Trouble is, without hearing you, no-one can say whether it's because you just ...


3

The sequences you've listed are extremely common, but there are thousands of variations that you could still call blues. So many, that it becomes futile to try and "collect" them. Just listen to lots of blues, listen to the chords and learn to spot the different sequences. One example "Going Back Home" by Dr Feelgood: | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / / | 1 / / ...


2

One part of the distinctive Hammond organ sound in rock/jazz is the use of a Leslie speaker cabinet. In my opinion, it is also the reason that Hammond organs were becoming less popular for mainstream music requiring big PAs and selling and broadcasting recordings. Because a Leslie speaker cannot be faithfully reproduced or simulated with reasonable effort. ...


2

Two blues scales exist generally. Minor blues as in C, Eb, F, Gb, G, Bb. Major blues as in C, D, Eb, E, G, A. Often players will mix the sets of notes in their playing. The minor blues is probably used more in guitar playing, due to the pattern of notes easily found because of the way guitars are tuned. The whole solo in Stevie Wonder's Sir Duke is major ...


2

What should I be able to do before I start learning anything blues or jazz related? You should be able to play the chords smoothly through the traditional I-IV-V blues progression in E,A,D,and G with a drum track. Then turn on your iPod and start playing along with simple blues music - Muddy Waters is a great blues artist to start with. His music is ...


2

"Without resorting to the C minor blues scale, how do I improvise over a I-IV-V progression using the C Major blues when the F is not in the scale?" Simply put, you don't. If anyone can find a single example of the major blues scale of the keynote being used over an entire I IV V I will gladly eat my hat. It is quite different to the usage of the ...


2

In most cases the C minor blues scale is exactly what you want. The ins and outs of this differ depending on the exact style you are trying to convey. You could play the C minor blues scale instead You could play the F major blues scale over the F chords, and the G Major blues scale over the G chords. Try both of these and see how they suit you. The ...


2

There are plenty of upbeat 12 bar blues songs, e.g.: Many of the songs Little Richard wrote (although they may not be suitable in a church context either ;-), e.g. ...


2

The problem with a question like this is that "Blues" is just a word, and when you use a word, it means whatever you want it to mean. In some fields, some words have very well-defined formal meanings, but the field of giving names to styles of music is generally vauge and informal. One person might have the firm belief that if you take a loping slide guitar ...


2

What people usually mean by "blues scale" is the scale that you already knew, i.e. a minor pentatonic scale with an added b5 ("blue note"). What the author of that book refers to as blues scale is actually more like a collection of notes, all of which can be used over a blues progression. The difference with the standard blues scale is that not all of those ...


2

The problem with answering the question "what notes are in the blues scale" is that the archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges, so any attempt at defining a blues scale in terms of the 12-note scale is only going to be an approximation. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on the guitar as a ...


2

It's still a type of I-IV-V progression, you're just in a minor key (D minor) instead of a major key (F major). The VI-II-III in actuality is a i(Dm)-iv(Gm)-V(A7). There's more then one flavor of blues progressions and this one is derived from typical minor blues progression patternes.



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