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18

I think there's an element of pragmatism to this. Some people are out for what they can get, but they also have an eye on what they could lose. Let's say you wrote Stack Exchange Blues, you're collecting royalties from it, and you hear my song Downvotes Got Me Cryin', which you believe steals enough to perhaps warrant a law suit. Well, you're going to have ...


13

There seems to be a general confusion here. Everything you can play or imagine is possible. Theory is a means to describe music, but music is by no way bound to any theory whatsoever. Major scales are typically not a good way to describe (or play) Blues. Better suited are scales that are aptly named "blues scales" (see ...


8

To answer the question: "Where does the line between what is acceptable to call plagiarism and musical "style" come in to play?" I have to say that unfortunately, pragmatically, it comes down to what you as a plaintiff can prove in court. It really does come down to the law. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and I am not giving any legal advice, which in any ...


8

A lot of blues numbers are built around the 12-bar sequence. This is, in its simplest form, I I I I IV IV I I V IV I V. Put this in, say, C,and the chord sequence is four bars of C, two bars of F, two bars of C, one of G, one of F, one of C, and the turnaround chord of G. Each of these sounds more bluesy with the added b7. So the first C7 chord will contain ...


4

To be clear, a blues progression is called a I7 IV7 V7 progression rather than I IV V which implies diatonic chords (in Bb that would be Bb major, Eb major, F7). Blues progressions actually do not conform to standard western musical harmony, you are correct by saying that improvisations will sound strange when playing diatonic major modes over the ...


4

V/ii denotes the (secondary) dominant (V) of the supertonic (ii). In the key of C major this would refer to the (secondary) dominant of the supertonic Dm, which is an A major chord. Adding the b9 gives you A(add b9), but I suppose - especially since it is a jazz blues - a dominant 7 must be inferred and thus it is an A7(b9) chord, with the notes A, C#, E, ...


4

You may not be able, easily, to play this ,in A, on a C harp.But there is probably no point. Just play it in the key of the harp you have. When you find the tab, it will still be playable, but you will be in a different key. This will only be a problem if other people want to play along with you, but that's a sort of inherent problem for most harmonica ...


3

It will depend to a degree on what the instruments are, and how advanced the player is.On piano/keyboard, it's quite easy to play both parts.On guitar, which is,I guess, what you play, it's not easy.Especially in C. You may well be able to transpose the key to E, using E,A and B(7). Or A, using A,D and E.That way, at least, you can put a bass pattern in on ...


3

Folk, country and blues draw on what is called "the oral tradition". Song "families" have always been part of the oral tradition, and building on -- even re-using -- pre-existing harmonic/melodic structures was/is common practice in those genres. Artists in those genres just kind of "get" that's the case. In the oral tradition, there was no concept of ...


3

This is a really subjective question. If you like playing on a 5 string bass then by all means get a 5 string bass. You might even want to try a 6 string before making that decision. Use however many strings you are comfortable with. There really isn't an absolute answer. Any number of strings is good for any kind of music. In any standard configurations, ...


3

This is an interesting summary of the whole George Harrison My Sweet Lord/He's So Fine plagiarism case, with some discussion of the legal issues involved: http://abbeyrd.best.vwh.net/mysweet.htm Of course, there are many examples of legal plagiarism of classical tunes. To name three: "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" was taken from the middle of Chopin's ...


2

This is a complicated topic, but I think it all boils down to conditioning and what listeners like to hear. There are many ways to harmonize a melody, yet most people use predictable chord progressions because they're easy to follow, work with, and understand. Jazz is a form of music that is very alienating to non-musicians. I'm certain there are countless ...


2

The key word is 'harmonically'. Blues does not follow all the harmonic rules. While it technically can be harmonically analyzed and it mostly follows the rules at the end of the day it is different because it is based on some non harmonic ideas, like the blues scale. I may have gotten you to think that all out of key chords and notes can be explained by ...


2

The Blues is interesting in that there is no one scale for the whole progression. Each chord within the progression will use a blues scale starting on its root. So E7 would be and E major blues, A7 would be A major blues etc. All the notes in a dominant 7 chord can be found in a major blues scale, 1,3,5, and b7 (in E: E,G#,B, D). The strangest part of ...


2

No, you don't need more than one player for the blues, as a lot of recordings show. Just playing the chords one time through will make most people recognize the tune form. If you would then solo using the C, F and G blues scales, changing scale where the chords change, people would still recognize the tune form. Adding the chords at different places in your ...


2

There are two diminished scales, the half/whole and the whole/half. This translates ,in C,as C,Db, Eb, E, F#,G, A, Bb, for the first, as it jumps semitone/tone, etc. The other works starting with C, D, Eb etc.Both work best over a diminished chord. I have used note names as they came, not particularly accurately. To fit into a solo, one way is to look at a ...


2

You don't say how much musical knowledge you have away from piano. I play guitar, I've never studied piano and I don't own a keyboard instrument. But I can play bluesy stuff on the piano no problem. Here's a bluffer's guide to playing blues in the key of Am/C which is of course the easiest key to play on piano. Right hand: Blues scale A C D Eb E G. the Eb ...


1

It is just common practice to call a blues with chords I7, IV7, and V7 a I-IV-V blues, simply because the chords are built on the first, the fourth and the fifth note of the (mixolydian) scale starting on the I. And it is understood that all chords are dominant-seventh chords (unless you're playing a minor blues). There are in fact lots of scales that can ...


1

You could call it a V-V-V with key changes, a IV-IV-IV , or whatever. The fact is that in a blues progression there are no key changes or modulations in a particular verse. The chords are related to each other,so in key A, with I, IV and V, it becomes A, D and E. Blues traditionally uses dominant 7th chords to get the 'feel', rather than a 7th just on the V ...


1

In a standard 12-bar I-IV-V blues progression (here in F) ||: F7 | F7 | F7 | F7 | | Bb7 | Bb7 | F7 | F7 | | C7 | Bb7 | F7 | C7 :|| there are three places where you should start trying to incorporate the diminished scale: bar 4, where the F7 chord can be interpreted as a dominant chord resolving to Bb7. Here you can add tension by using the half-whole ...


1

Consider the half whole diminished scale: R b9 b3 3 #4 5 6 b7 R All notes except one are very commonly used in blues soloing. the inclusion of both the b3 and 3 gives the essence of blues (mixing major and minor). The 'blues note' (b5/#4) is there. All of the chord tones are there. The 6 is there. So it suits blues very well. Try these over a dominant ...


1

I think DougusMaximus came the closest to the real answer. Being a rock musician (and especially for guitar players), just about the first "whole song" chord progression one learns is the "12 bar blues". Written by... well, no one. There is no copyright or ownership on it, because it has been around for so long, no one knows who to give first credit to it ...


1

To answer the OP question of 'In blues, country blues, why don't songwriters get sued for aping the same progressions/tempos/scales as other established blues songs?' Progressions, tempos and scales are tools to use to express a musical thought that we all use. The melody and combination of chords with rhythmic patterns are the work of these tools and ...


1

For blues specifically : A good percentage of blues follows the same chord progression (good ol' 12-bar) and a LOT follow very similar paths with melody, riffs, bridges, and lyrics. Why don't they all sue each other ? The problem would be identifying who did it first. The 12-bar progression is thought to have eminated from African slave/chain gangs, ...


1

There are law-based answers to this question, but the laws about music had to be constructed around the preexisting musical culture. Ultimately the reason you don't get sued for copying a chord progression probably has to be explained in terms of the reasons why chord progressions are not considered as unique and individualistic as melodies. Here are three ...


1

Can't say I've come across it before, written that way, but, in C, it could be G7 with a flat 9. with a D bass, played D-G-B-D-F-Ab, but not necessarily in that order, except the D bass.The Ab should be an octave above the low G, otherwise there is a clash, and it wouldn't be a b9. Love the term 'parse'!!



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